6939

I have an array of Numbers, and I'm using the .push() method to add elements to it.

Is there a simple way to remove a specific element from an array? The equivalent of something like array.remove(number);.

I have to use core JavaScript - no frameworks are allowed.

  • 89
    If you need to support <IE9 (sigh) then check this SO question regarding indexOf in IE. – Scotty.NET Sep 13 '13 at 7:48
  • 21
    (lodash) array = ['a', 'b', 'c']; _.pull(array, 'a') // array => ['b', 'c']; See also stackoverflow.com/questions/5767325/… – Chun Yang Aug 25 '15 at 20:28
  • 7
    filter method can do what you want. – Salvador Dali Sep 5 '15 at 23:43
  • 5
    You can use delete but it will not rearange the index instead it will set this slot to 'undefined × 1'. For example: var list = [1,2,3,4,5,6] -> delete list[1] -> [1, undefined × 1, 3, 4, 5, 6]. – DevWL May 24 '16 at 23:26
  • 6
    Here a performance benchmark of the two major possibilities: jsben.ch/#/b4Ume – EscapeNetscape Mar 3 '17 at 16:46

76 Answers 76

13
  Array.prototype.removeItem = function(a) {
            for (i = 0; i < this.length; i++) {
                if (this[i] == a) {
                    for (i2 = i; i2 < this.length - 1; i2++) {
                        this[i2] = this[i2 + 1];
                    }
                    this.length = this.length - 1
                    return;
                }
            }
        }

    var recentMovies = ['Iron Man', 'Batman', 'Superman', 'Spiderman'];
    recentMovies.removeItem('Superman');
13

Remove by Index

Function that return a copy of array without the element at index.

/**
* removeByIndex
* @param {Array} array
* @param {Number} index
*/
function removeByIndex(array, index){
    return array.filter(function(elem, _index){
        return index != _index;
    });
}
l = [1,3,4,5,6,7];
console.log(removeByIndex(l, 1));

$> [ 1, 4, 5, 6, 7 ]

Remove by Value

Function that return a copy of array without the Value.

/**
* removeByValue
* @param {Array} array
* @param {Number} value
*/
function removeByValue(array, value){
    return array.filter(function(elem, _index){
        return value != elem;
    });
}
l = [1,3,4,5,6,7];
console.log(removeByValue(l, 5));

$> [ 1, 3, 4, 6, 7]
  • Are redundant constructions the norm around web developers? I have someone at work spraying stuff like this everywhere. Why not just return value != elem?! – Buffalo Jul 24 '17 at 11:59
11

Create new array:

var my_array = new Array();

Add elements to this array:

my_array.push("element1");

The function indexOf (Returns index or -1 when not found) :

var indexOf = function(needle) 
{
    if(typeof Array.prototype.indexOf === 'function') // newer browsers
    {
        indexOf = Array.prototype.indexOf;
    } 
    else // older browsers
    {
        indexOf = function(needle) 
        {
            var index = -1;

            for(var i = 0; i < this.length; i++) 
            {
                if(this[i] === needle) 
                {
                    index = i;
                    break;
                }
            }
            return index;
        };
    }

    return indexOf.call(this, needle);
};

Check index of this element (tested with firefox and IE8+):

var index = indexOf.call(my_array, "element1");

Remove 1 element located at index from the array

my_array.splice(index, 1);
10

I also ran in the situation where I had to remove an element from Array. .indexOf was not working in IE* so sharing my working jQuery.inArray() solution.

var index = jQuery.inArray(val,arr);
if (index > -1) {
    arr.splice(index, 1);
    //console.log(arr);
}
  • jQuery is always good for taking care of any cross-browser compatibility issues of the different JavaScript APIs. – Henry Heleine Dec 9 '14 at 22:15
9

I think many of the JavaScript instructions are not well thought out for functional programming. Splice returns the deleted element where most of the time you need the reduced array. This is bad.

Imagine you are doing a recursive call and have to pass an array with one less item, probably without the current indexed item. Or imagine you are doing another recursive call and has to pass an array with an element pushed.

In neither of these cases you can do myRecursiveFunction(myArr.push(c)) or myRecursiveFunction(myArr.splice(i,1)). The first idiot will in fact pass the length of the array and the second idiot will pass the deleted element as a parameter.

So what I do in fact... For deleting an array element and passing the resulting to a function as a parameter at the same time I do as follows

myRecursiveFunction(myArr.slice(0,i).concat(a.slice(i+1)))

When it comes to push that's more silly... I do like,

myRecursiveFunction((myArr.push(c),myArr))

I believe in a proper functional language a method mutating the object it's called upon must return a reference to the very object as a result.

9

2017-05-08

Most of the given answers work for strict comparison, meaning that both objects reference the exact same object in memory (or are primitive types), but often you want to remove a non-primitive object from an array that has a certain value. For instance, if you make a call to a server and want to check a retrieved object against a local object.

const a = {'field': 2} // Non-primitive object
const b = {'field': 2} // Non-primitive object with same value
const c = a            // Non-primitive object that reference the same object as "a"

assert(a !== b) // Don't reference the same item, but have same value
assert(a === c) // Do reference the same item, and have same value (naturally)

//Note: there are many alternative implementations for valuesAreEqual
function valuesAreEqual (x, y) {
   return  JSON.stringify(x) === JSON.stringify(y)
}


//filter will delete false values
//Thus, we want to return "false" if the item
// we want to delete is equal to the item in the array
function removeFromArray(arr, toDelete){
    return arr.filter(target => {return !valuesAreEqual(toDelete, target)})
}

const exampleArray = [a, b, b, c, a, {'field': 2}, {'field': 90}];
const resultArray = removeFromArray(exampleArray, a);

//resultArray = [{'field':90}]

There are alternative/faster implementations for valuesAreEqual, but this does the job. You can also use a custom comparator if you have a specific field to check (for example, some retrieved UUID vs a local UUID).

Also note that this is a functional operation, meaning that it does not mutate the original array.

  • 1
    I like the idea, just think is a bit slow to do two stringify per element on the array. Anyway there are cases in which it will worth, thanks for sharing. – Adriano Spadoni Jul 25 '17 at 8:56
  • Thanks, I added an edit to clarify that valuesAreEqual can be substituted. I agree that the JSON approach is slow -- but it will always work. Should definitely use better comparison when possible. – Aidan Hoolachan Oct 7 '17 at 20:33
8

In CoffeeScript:

my_array.splice(idx, 1) for ele, idx in my_array when ele is this_value
7

Use jQuery's InArray:

A = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6];
A.splice($.inArray(3, A), 1);
//It will return A=[1, 2, 4, 5, 6]`   

Note: inArray will return -1, if the element was not found.

  • 5
    but OP said: "good ol' fashioned JavaScript - no frameworks allowed" – CSᵠ Dec 12 '14 at 18:51
  • for Chrome 50.0, A.splice(-1, 1); will remove the last one in A. – Scott 混合理论 Jun 17 '16 at 9:38
6

You can iterate over each array-item and splice it if it exist in your array.

function destroy(arr, val) {
    for (var i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) if (arr[i] === val) arr.splice(i, 1);
    return arr;
}
  • destroy( [1,2,3,3,3,4,5], 3 ) returns [1,2,3,4,5]]. i should not be incremented when the array is spliced. – Renze de Waal Jan 23 '14 at 17:34
  • @RenzedeWaal this might work if you iterated over i backwards instead of forwards though. for (var i = arr.length; i-- > 0; ) [ edit ] already posted here – TKoL Mar 3 '17 at 12:58
6

I like this version of splice, removing an element by its value using $.inArray:

$(document).ready(function(){
    var arr = ["C#","Ruby","PHP","C","C++"];
    var itemtoRemove = "PHP";
    arr.splice($.inArray(itemtoRemove, arr),1);
});
  • Removes last item if searched item not found – Hontoni Apr 30 '14 at 17:05
  • 1
    yes correct, you should know which element you want to remove like in the other examples. – mboeckle May 1 '14 at 17:00
  • 3
    This is jQuery, not core JavaScript. – Dughall Apr 18 '16 at 15:31
  • any other way for some repeated value max 5 times then create new array and remove that value from array? I HAVE THIS KIND OF ARRAY: ["info.specificAllergy", "info.specificAllergy", "info.specificAllergy", "info.specificAllergy", "info.specificAllergy", "info.existingMedicalCondition", "info.existingMedicalCondition", "info.existingMedicalCondition", "info.existingMedicalCondition", "info.existingMedicalCondition"] – Jignesh Vagh Jul 14 '17 at 14:22
6

Remove element at index i, without mutating the original array:

/**
* removeElement
* @param {Array} array
* @param {Number} index
*/
function removeElement(array, index) {
   return Array.from(array).splice(index, 1);
}

// Another way is
function removeElement(array, index) {
   return array.slice(0).splice(index, 1);
}
6

Vanilla JavaScript (ES5.1) – in place edition

Browser support: Internet Explorer 9 or later (detailed browser support)

/**
 * Removes all occurences of the item from the array.
 *
 * Modifies the array “in place”, i.e. the array passed as an argument
 * is modified as opposed to creating a new array. Also returns the modified
 * array for your convenience.
 */
function removeInPlace(array, item) {
    var foundIndex, fromIndex;

    // Look for the item (the item can have multiple indices)
    fromIndex = array.length - 1;
    foundIndex = array.lastIndexOf(item, fromIndex);

    while (foundIndex !== -1) {
        // Remove the item (in place)
        array.splice(foundIndex, 1);

        // Bookkeeping
        fromIndex = foundIndex - 1;
        foundIndex = array.lastIndexOf(item, fromIndex);
    }

    // Return the modified array
    return array;
}

Vanilla JavaScript (ES5.1) – immutable edition

Browser support: Same as vanilla JavaScript in place edition

/**
 * Removes all occurences of the item from the array.
 *
 * Returns a new array with all the items of the original array except
 * the specified item.
 */
function remove(array, item) {
    var arrayCopy;

    arrayCopy = array.slice();

    return removeInPlace(arrayCopy, item);
}

Vanilla ES6 – immutable edition

Browser support: Chrome 46, Edge 12, Firefox 16, Opera 37, Safari 8 (detailed browser support)

/**
 * Removes all occurences of the item from the array.
 *
 * Returns a new array with all the items of the original array except
 * the specified item.
 */
function remove(array, item) {
    // Copy the array
    array = [...array];

    // Look for the item (the item can have multiple indices)
    let fromIndex = array.length - 1;
    let foundIndex = array.lastIndexOf(item, fromIndex);

    while (foundIndex !== -1) {
        // Remove the item by generating a new array without it
        array = [
            ...array.slice(0, foundIndex),
            ...array.slice(foundIndex + 1),
        ];

        // Bookkeeping
        fromIndex = foundIndex - 1;
        foundIndex = array.lastIndexOf(item, fromIndex)
    }

    // Return the new array
    return array;
}
5

By my solution you can remove one or more than one item in an array thanks to pure JavaScript. There is no need for another JavaScript library.

var myArray = [1,2,3,4,5]; // First array

var removeItem = function(array,value) {  // My clear function
    if(Array.isArray(value)) {  // For multi remove
        for(var i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            for(var j = value.length - 1; j >= 0; j--) {
                if(array[i] === value[j]) {
                    array.splice(i, 1);
                };
            }
        }
    }
    else { // For single remove
        for(var i = array.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
            if(array[i] === value) {
                array.splice(i, 1);
            }
        }
    }
}

removeItem(myArray,[1,4]); // myArray will be [2,3,5]
5

I made a fairly efficient extension to the base JavaScript array:

Array.prototype.drop = function(k) {
  var valueIndex = this.indexOf(k);
  while(valueIndex > -1) {
    this.removeAt(valueIndex);
    valueIndex = this.indexOf(k);
  }
};
  • 3
    I read that you shouldnt modify an Object you dont own – ThomasP1988 Oct 14 '16 at 9:48
  • Also, no removeAt in ES standard. I suppose, this is some IE-only stuff? That should be mentioned in answer. – ankhzet Jun 19 '18 at 9:01
5

I just created a polyfill on the Array.prototype via Object.defineProperty to remove a desired element in an array without leading to errors when iterating over it later via for .. in ..

if (!Array.prototype.remove) {
  // Object.definedProperty is used here to avoid problems when iterating with "for .. in .." in Arrays
  // https://stackoverflow.com/questions/948358/adding-custom-functions-into-array-prototype
  Object.defineProperty(Array.prototype, 'remove', {
    value: function () {
      if (this == null) {
        throw new TypeError('Array.prototype.remove called on null or undefined')
      }

      for (var i = 0; i < arguments.length; i++) {
        if (typeof arguments[i] === 'object') {
          if (Object.keys(arguments[i]).length > 1) {
            throw new Error('This method does not support more than one key:value pair per object on the arguments')
          }
          var keyToCompare = Object.keys(arguments[i])[0]

          for (var j = 0; j < this.length; j++) {
            if (this[j][keyToCompare] === arguments[i][keyToCompare]) {
              this.splice(j, 1)
              break
            }
          }
        } else {
          var index = this.indexOf(arguments[i])
          if (index !== -1) {
            this.splice(index, 1)
          }
        }
      }
      return this
    }
  })
} else {
  var errorMessage = 'DANGER ALERT! Array.prototype.remove has already been defined on this browser. '
  errorMessage += 'This may lead to unwanted results when remove() is executed.'
  console.log(errorMessage)
}

Removing an integer value

var a = [1, 2, 3]
a.remove(2)
a // Output => [1, 3]

Removing a string value

var a = ['a', 'ab', 'abc']
a.remove('abc')
a // Output => ['a', 'ab']

Removing a boolean value

var a = [true, false, true]
a.remove(false)
a // Output => [true, true]

It is also possible to remove an object inside the array via this Array.prototype.remove method. You just need to specify the key => value of the Object you want to remove.

Removing an object value

var a = [{a: 1, b: 2}, {a: 2, b: 2}, {a: 3, b: 2}]
a.remove({a: 1})
a // Output => [{a: 2, b: 2}, {a: 3, b: 2}]
4

While most of the answers above answer the question, it is not clear enough why the slice() method has not been used. Yes, filter() meets the immutability criteria, but how about doing the following shorter equivalent:

const myArray = [1,2,3,4];

And now lets say that we should remove the second element from the array, we can simply do: const newArray = myArray.slice(0,1).concat(myArray.slice(2,4)); // [1,3,4]

This way of deleting an element from an array is strongly encouraged today in the community due to its simple and immutable nature. In general, methods which cause mutation should be avoided. For example, you are encouraged to replace push() with concat() and splice() with slice()

4

Remove one value, using loose comparison, without mutating original array, ES6

/**
 * Removes one instance of `value` from `array`, without mutating the original array. Uses loose comparison.
 * 
 * @param {Array} array Array to remove value from
 * @param {*} value Value to remove
 * @returns {Array} Array with `value` removed
 */
export function arrayRemove(array, value) {
    for(let i=0; i<array.length; ++i) {
        if(array[i] == value) {
            let copy = [...array];
            copy.splice(i, 1);
            return copy;
        }
    }
    return array;
}
4

Use jQuery.grep():

var y = [1, 2, 3, 9, 4]
var removeItem = 9;

y = jQuery.grep(y, function(value) {
  return value != removeItem;
});
console.log(y)
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.12.2/jquery.min.js"></script>

  • 5
    The OP specifically said no frameworks. Hence the downvote. – codingsplash Aug 6 '16 at 9:56
4

Yet another answer, to me the simpler is the better, and as we are in 2018 (near 2019) i give you this (near) one liner to answer the original question :

Array.prototype.remove = function (value) { 
    return this.filter(f => f != value) 
}

The useful thing is that you can use it in a curry expression such as :

[1,2,3].remove(2).sort()

4

Removing a particular element/string from an array can be done in a one liner: I still think this is the most elegant one liner you can get for this type of problem :

theArray.splice(theArray.indexOf("stringToRemoveFromArray"), 1);

where 'theArray' is the array you want to remove something particular from.

3

There are many fantastic answers here, but for me, what worked most simply wasn't removing my element from the array completely but simply setting the value of it to null. This works for most cases I have, and is a good solution since I will be using the variable later and don't want it gone, just empty for now. Also, this approach is completely cross-browser compatible.

array.key = null;
3

Remove last occurrence or all occurrences, or first occurrence?

var array = [2, 5, 9, 5];

// Remove last occurrence (or all occurrences)
for (var i = array.length; i--;) {
  if (array[i] === 5) {
     array.splice(i, 1);
     break; // Remove this line to remove all occurrences
  }
}

or

var array = [2, 5, 9, 5];

// Remove first occurrence
for (var i = 0; array.length; i++) {
  if (array[i] === 5) {
     array.splice(i, 1);
     break; // Do not remove this line
  }
}
3

I made a function

function pop(valuetoremove, myarray) {
var indexofmyvalue = myarray.indexOf(valuetoremove);
myarray.splice(indexofmyvalue, 1);
}

And used like this.

pop(valuetoremove,myarray);

Cheers!

  • If you're going to name it pop at least make it do what the method name implies! – Jamiec Mar 28 '17 at 14:06
3

Post my code that removes an array element in place, and reduce the array length as well.

function removeElement(idx, arr) {
    // check the index value
    if (idx < 0 || idx >= arr.length) {
        return;
    }
    // shift the elements
    for (var i = idx; i > 0; --i) {
        arr[i] = arr[i - 1];
    }
    // remove the first element in array
    arr.shift();
}
3

For anyone looking to replicate a method that will return a new array that has duplicate numbers or strings removed, this has been put together from existing answers:

function uniq(array) {
  var len = array.length;
  var dupFree = [];
  var tempObj = {};

  for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    tempObj[array[i]] = 0;
  }

  console.log(tempObj);

  for (var i in tempObj) {
    var element = i;
    if (i.match(/\d/)) {
      element = Number(i);
    }
    dupFree.push(element);
  }

  return dupFree;
}
3

Very naive implementation would be as following:

Array.prototype.remove = function(data) {
    const dataIdx = this.indexOf(data)
    if(dataIdx >= 0) {
        this.splice(dataIdx ,1);
    }
    return this.length;
}

let a = [1,2,3];
// this will change arr a to [1, 3]
a.remove(2);

I return length of the array from the function to comply with the other methods like Array.prototype.push().

2
var index,
    input = [1,2,3],
    indexToRemove = 1;
    integers = [];

for (index in input) {
    if (input.hasOwnProperty(index)) {
        if (index !== indexToRemove) {
            integers.push(result); 
        }
    }
}
input = integers;

This solution will take an array of input and will search through the input for the value to remove. This will loop through the entire input array and the result will be a second array integers that has had the specific index removed. The integers array is then copied back into the input array.

  • 1
    This is very inefficient when the array is large. – Christophe Roussy Sep 25 '14 at 14:40
2

Removing the value with index and splice!

function removeArrValue(arr,value) {
    var index = arr.indexOf(value);
    if (index > -1) {
        arr.splice(index, 1);
    }
    return arr;
}
  • 14
    Your 2 last comments were just rewriting an accepted answer... Please answer a solved problem only if you have more information to provide than the accepted one. If not, just upvote the accepted answer. – ylerjen Oct 22 '14 at 14:43
2

The following method will remove all entries of a given value from an array without creating a new array and with only one iteration which is superfast. And it works in ancient Internet Explorer 5.5 browser:

function removeFromArray(arr, removeValue) {
  for (var i = 0, k = 0, len = arr.length >>> 0; i < len; i++) {
    if (k > 0)
      arr[i - k] = arr[i];

    if (arr[i] === removeValue)
      k++;
  }

  for (; k--;)
    arr.pop();
}

var a = [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3];

document.getElementById('code').innerHTML =
  'Initial array [' + a.join(', ') + ']';
//Initial array [0, 1, 0, 2, 0, 3]

removeFromArray(a, 0);

document.getElementById('code').innerHTML +=
  '<br>Resulting array [' + a.join(', ') + ']';
//Resulting array [1, 2, 3]
<code id="code"></code>

  • What is meaning of this code I could not understand. – Ankur Loriya Dec 17 '15 at 14:22
  • @AnkurLoriya This code removes all 0s from the given array – Eugene Tiurin Dec 25 '15 at 19:16
2

What a shame you have an array of integers, not an object where the keys are string equivalents of these integers.

I've looked through a lot of these answers and they all seem to use "brute force" as far as I can see. I haven't examined every single one, apologies if this is not so. For a smallish array this is fine, but what if you have 000s of integers in it?

Correct me if I'm wrong, but can't we assume that in a key => value map, of the kind which a JS object is, that the key retrieval mechanism can be assumed to be highly engineered and optimised? (NB if some super-expert tells me that this is not the case, I can suggest using ES6's Map class instead, which certainly will be).

I'm just suggesting that, in certain circumstances, the best solution might be to convert your array to an object... the problem being, of course, that you might have repeating integer values. I suggest putting those in buckets as the "value" part of the key => value entries. (NB if you are sure you don't have any repeating array elements this can be much simpler: values "same as" keys, and just go Object.values(...) to get back your modified array).

So you could do:

const arr = [ 1, 2, 55, 3, 2, 4, 55 ];
const f =   function( acc, val, currIndex ){ 
    // not seen this val before: make bucket... NB although val's typeof is 'number'
    // there is seamless equivalence between the object key (always string)
    // and this variable val 
    ! ( val in acc ) ? acc[ val ] = []: 0;
    // drop another array index in the bucket
    acc[ val ].push( currIndex );
    return acc; 
}
const myIntsMapObj = arr.reduce( f, {});

console.log( myIntsMapObj );

output:

Object [ <1 empty slot>, Array1, Array[2], Array1, Array1, <5 empty slots>, 46 more… ]

it is then easy to delete all the numbers 55

delete myIntsMapObj[ 55 ]; // again, although keys are strings this works

You don't have to delete them all: index values are pushed into their buckets in order of appearance, so (for example):

myIntsMapObj[ 55 ].shift(); // and
myIntsMapObj[ 55 ].pop(); 

will delete the first and last occurrence respectively. You can count frequency of occurrence easily, replace all 55s with 3s by transferring the contents of one bucket to another, etc.

... getting back your modified int array is slightly involved: but each bucket contains the index (in the original array) of the value represented by the (string) key. Each of these bucket values is also unique: so you turn them into keys in a new object, with the (real) integer from the "integer string key" as value... then sort the keys and go Object.values( ... ).

This sounds very involved and time-consuming... but obviously everything depends on the circumstances and desired usage. My understanding is that all versions and contexts of JS operate only in one thread, and the thread doesn't "let go", so there could be some horrible congestion with a "brute force" method: caused not so much by the indexOf ops, but multiple repeated slice/splice ops.

Addendum
If you're sure this is too much engineering for your use case surely the simplest "brute force" approach is

const arr = [ 1, 2, 3, 66, 8, 2, 3, 2 ];
const newArray = arr.filter( number => number !== 3 );
console.log( newArray )

(yes, other answers have spotted Array.prototype.filter...)

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