3

I don't have problem in understanding output shape of a Dense layer followed by a Flatten layer. Output shape is in accordance of my understanding i.e (Batch size, unit).

nn= keras.Sequential()
nn.add(keras.layers.Conv2D(8,kernel_size=(2,2),input_shape=(4,5,1)))
nn.add(keras.layers.Conv2D(1,kernel_size=(2,2)))
nn.add(keras.layers.Flatten())
nn.add(keras.layers.Dense(5))
nn.add(keras.layers.Dense(1))

nn.summary()

Output is:

_________________________________________________________________
Layer (type)                 Output Shape              Param #   
=================================================================
conv2d_1 (Conv2D)            (None, 3, 4, 8)           40        
_________________________________________________________________
conv2d_2 (Conv2D)            (None, 2, 3, 1)           33        
_________________________________________________________________
flatten_1 (Flatten)          (None, 6)                 0         
_________________________________________________________________
dense_1 (Dense)              (None, 5)                 35        
_________________________________________________________________
dense_2 (Dense)              (None, 1)                 6         
=================================================================
Total params: 114
Trainable params: 114
Non-trainable params: 0
_________________________________________________________________

But I am having trouble in understanding the output shape of a dense layer for multidimensional input .So for following code

nn= keras.Sequential()
nn.add(keras.layers.Conv2D(8,kernel_size=(2,2),input_shape=(4,5,1)))
nn.add(keras.layers.Conv2D(1,kernel_size=(2,2)))
#nn.add(keras.layers.Flatten())
nn.add(keras.layers.Dense(5))
nn.add(keras.layers.Dense(1))

nn.summary()

output is

_________________________________________________________________
Layer (type)                 Output Shape              Param #   
=================================================================
conv2d_1 (Conv2D)            (None, 3, 4, 8)           40        
_________________________________________________________________
conv2d_2 (Conv2D)            (None, 2, 3, 1)           33        
_________________________________________________________________
dense_1 (Dense)              (None, 2, 3, 5)           10        
_________________________________________________________________
dense_2 (Dense)              (None, 2, 3, 1)           6         
=================================================================
Total params: 89
Trainable params: 89

I am unable to make intuition for output shape of dense_1 and dense_2 layer. Shouldn't the final output be a scalar or (batch,unit)? Following answer to similar question tries to explain the intuition but I can not fully grasp the concept. From the same answer:

That is, each output "pixel" (i, j) in the 640x959 grid is calculated as a dense combination of the 8 different convolution channels at point (i, j) from the previous layer.

May be some explanation with pictures will be useful .

3
  • i'm sorry i'll delete coment later, can't help you for you'r problem. But do you have any documentation why people use multidimensional dense layer? can't find any article – akhetos Aug 28 '19 at 11:41
  • 3
    I pondered upon this question while implementing discriminant model of this paper arxiv.org/abs/1609.04802 . Another use case could be semantic segmentation of image when you are trying to predict whether a pixel belongs to a specific class. Like if you have to color the region of an image containing a car. Then you would like to know the probability distribution for every pixel of image. – user_3pij Aug 28 '19 at 12:42
  • 1
    Comment section of accepted answer is also worth reading for better understanding. – user_3pij Aug 28 '19 at 14:18
2

This is tricky but it does fit with the documentation from Keras on dense layers,

Output shape

nD tensor with shape: (batch_size, ..., units). For instance, for a 2D input with shape (batch_size, input_dim), the output would have shape (batch_size, units)

Note it is not the clearest, but they are saying with the ... that the final dimension of the input shape will be elided by the number of dense connections. Basically, for each item of the final dimension, create a connection to each of the requested dense nodes in the coming dense layer.

In your case you have something which is 2 x 3 x 1. So there is "one thing" (the 2 x 3 thing) to be connected to each of the 5 dense layer nodes, hense 2 x 3 x 5. You can think of it like channels of a CNN layer in this particular case. There is a distinct 2 x 3 sheet of outputs for each of the 5 output "nodes".

In a purely 2-D case (batch_size, units) ... then each item iterated by the final dimension units is itself a scalar value, so you end up with something of exactly the size of the number of dense nodes requested.

But in a higher-dimensional case, each item you iterate along the final dimension of the input will itself still be a higher-dimensional thing, and so the output is k distinct "clones" of those higher-dimensional things, where k is the dense layer size requested, and by "clone" we mean the output for a single dense connection has the same shape as the the items in the final dimension of the input.

Then the Dense-ness means that each specific element of that output has a connection to each element of the corresponding set of inputs. But be careful about this. Dense layers are defined by having "one" connection between each item of the output and each item of the input. So even though you have 5 "2x3 things" in your output, they each just have one solitary weight associated with them about how they are connected to the 2x3 thing that is the input. Keras also defaults to using a bias vector (not bias tensor), so if the dense layer has dimension k and the final dimension of the previous layer is n you should expect (n+1)k trainable parameters. These will always be used with numpy-like broadcasting to make the lesser dimensional shape of the weight and bias vectors conformable to the actual shapes of the input tensors.

It is customary to use Flatten as in your first example if you want to enforce the exact size of the coming dense layer. You would use multidimensional Dense layer when you want different "(n - 1)D" groups of connections to each Dense node. This is probably extremely rare for higher dimensional inputs because you'd typically want a CNN type of operation, but I could imagine maybe in some cases where a model predicts pixel-wise values or if you are generating a full nD output, like from the decoder portion of an encoder-decoder network, you might want a dense array of cells that match the dimensions of some expected structured output type like an image or video.

6
  • Then what about trainable parameters? Shouldn't they be same for dense layers for both cases? How are they 6 for dense_2 layer? It's like if you have vector of size 5 as input to dense_2 layer. How will you connect 6 param ( 5 weight 1 bias) to "2 x 3 thing" ? – user_3pij Aug 28 '19 at 13:47
  • 1
    I think the trainable params make sense too. In a Dense connection, there is just one single weight associated with each item of the inputs connected to each item of the outputs. There is only 1 item of the inputs, (the "2 x 3" thing) and there are 5 items of the outputs (5 distinct 2 x 3 things). So that means 5 weights. In addition there is a bias vector of 5 additional weights. In all cases, these weights are treated with broadcasting to make them work with the shapes. – ely Aug 28 '19 at 13:55
  • In the final layer, you have 5 inputs and 1 output (5 weights) plus a bias vector of size 1 for the output, so 6 weights. – ely Aug 28 '19 at 14:02
  • I think I've got it now. It's like if we have a matrix of 2 x 3 and we are multiplying each of its element with a scalar value (1 weight). So for 5 matrices of size 2 x 3 , we are multiplying 5 scalar (5 weigts) values to respective matrices. Am I right? – user_3pij Aug 28 '19 at 14:05
  • 2
    Yes, that plus the addition of the bias vectors. Basically Dense is happy to treat everything prior to the final input dimension as a whole "unit" of operation. Dense(K) assumes you want K output "units" that are "the same as" the input units, with "one connection" (modulo broadcasting of a single weight) between each input and each output, plus a bias vector of size K (again broadcasted) for the output units. The point is that "unit" of Dense output is fully abstract in terms of its shape. Replace "neuron" with "2 x 3 thing" in your example, then apply the standard logic of Dense. – ely Aug 28 '19 at 14:09

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