10

I found two ways to determine how many elements are in a variable… I always get the same values for len () and size (). Is there a difference? Could size () have come with an imported library (like math, numpy, pandas)?

asdf = range (10)
print ( 'len:', len (asdf), 'versus size:', size (asdf) )

asdf = list (range (10))
print ( 'len:', len (asdf), 'versus size:', size (asdf) )

asdf = np.array (range (10))
print ( 'len:', len (asdf), 'versus size:', size (asdf) )

asdf = tuple (range (10))
print ( 'len:', len (asdf), 'versus size:', size (asdf) )
5
  • 1
    Where did size come from? Unlike len, it's not a built-in function.
    – jonrsharpe
    Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 11:48
  • Try to make your code clear so that people can understand easily to solve the issue
    – amrs-tech
    Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 11:55
  • @jonrsharpe I didn't define size myself, might it have come with a library I imported…?
    – Nepumuk
    Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 12:02
  • 1
    It could be numpy.size, if you did a wildcard import (which you shouldn't).
    – jonrsharpe
    Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 12:04
  • @jonrsharpe After commenting out every imported module, %pylab inline and %matplotlib inline, it's definitely the line %pylab inline (and not even numpy itself), which is Populating the interactive namespace from numpy and matplotlib and hence causing the error…
    – Nepumuk
    Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 12:24

3 Answers 3

15

size comes from numpy (on which pandas is based).

It gives you the total number of elements in the array. However, you can also query the sizes of specific axes with np.size (see below).

In contrast, len gives the length of the first dimension.

For example, let's create an array with 36 elements shaped into three dimensions.

In [1]: import numpy as np                                                      

In [2]: a = np.arange(36).reshape(2, 3, -1)                                     

In [3]: a                                                                       
Out[3]: 
array([[[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
        [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
        [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]],

       [[18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23],
        [24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29],
        [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35]]])

In [4]: a.shape                                                                 
Out[4]: (2, 3, 6)

size

size will give you the total number of elements.

In [5]: a.size                                                        
Out[5]: 36

len

len will give you the number of 'elements' of the first dimension.

In [6]: len(a)                                                                  
Out[6]: 2

This is because, in this case, each 'element' stands for a 2-dimensional array.

In [14]: a[0]                                                                   
Out[14]: 
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4,  5],
       [ 6,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11],
       [12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17]])

In [15]: a[1]                                                                   
Out[15]: 
array([[18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23],
       [24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29],
       [30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35]])

These arrays, in turn, have their own shape and size.

In [16]: a[0].shape                                                             
Out[16]: (3, 6)

In [17]: len(a[0])                                                              
Out[17]: 3

np.size

You can use size more specifically with np.size.

For example you can reproduce len by specifying the first ('0') dimension.

In [11]: np.size(a, 0)                                                          
Out[11]: 2

And you can also query the sizes of the other dimensions.

In [10]: np.size(a, 1)                                                          
Out[10]: 3

In [12]: np.size(a, 2)                                                          
Out[12]: 6

Basically, you reproduce the values of shape.

0

Numpy nparray has Size https://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.ndarray.size.html

Whilst len is from Python itself

Size is from numpy ndarray.size

The main difference is that nparray size only measures the size of an array, whilst python's Len can be used for getting the length of objects in general

-1

Consider this example :

a = numpy.array([[1,2,3,4,5,6],[7,8,9,10,11,12]])
print(len(a))
#output is 2
print(numpy.size(a))
#output is 12

len() is built-in method used to compute the length of iterable python objects like str, list , dict etc. len returns the length of the iterable, i.e the number of elements. In above example the array is actually of length 2, because it is a nested list where each list is considered as an element.

numpy.size() returns the size of the array, it is equal to n_dim1 * n_dim2 * --- n_dimn , i.e it is the product of dimensions of the array, for example if we have an array of dimension (5,5,2), the size is 50, as it can hold 50 elements. But len() will return 5, because the number of elements in higher order list (or 1st dimension is 5).

According to your question, len() and numpy.size() return same output for 1-D arrays (same as lists) but in vector form. However, the results are different for 2-D + arrays. So to get the correct answer, use numpy.size() as it returns the actual size.

When you callnumpy.size() on any iterable, as in your example, it is first casted to a numpy array object, then size() is called.

Thanks for A2A

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