1
#include<iostream>
#include<iomanip>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    float c = 5.0;
    float far = (9/5)*c + 32;
    cout << fixed << "Temperature in Fahrenheit is "<< setprecision(2) << 
    far;
    return 0;
} 

I expected the output to be 41.00, but the actual output is 37.00.

  • You could change the order of evaluation to c * 9 / 5. The expression is evaluated left to right and types are converted to float at each step. – Marko Mahnič Aug 29 '19 at 17:24
2

Note that 9 and 5 are ints and hence 9/5 results in int 1.

Your code operates on floats and needs a float multiplier for the conversion to work correctly. So a fix would be to define the multiplier as 9.f / 5 (. is a shorthand notation for .0 exponent, f suffix designates a float literal, see floating point literal for more details), e.g.:

float far = (9.f / 5) * c + 32;
| improve this answer | |
  • Changing the order of eavluation to c * 9 / 5 will also work. – Marko Mahnič Aug 29 '19 at 17:25
  • 1
    @MarkoMahnič That is true, however, (9.f/5) is calculated at compile time and replaced with a constant. Whereas c * 9 / 5 has to be evaluated as written at run-time due to non-associativity of floating point operations, i.e. (c*9.f)/5 != c*(9.f/5) – Maxim Egorushkin Aug 29 '19 at 17:48
1

since 9/5 is in brackets, divison will happen first which results to 1. so 1*5+32 = 37

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