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I'm attempting to port a working SOAP client (written in Perl) to PowerShell for a different client (who won't allow us to pollute their locked-down windows environment with Perl).

So I try and download the WSDL information to create a proxy, using examples I found on the Web. This is how the existing Perl Code works, so the approach is sound.

$soap = New-WebServiceProxy -Uri $url -UseDefaultCredential

New-WebServiceProxy : The HTML document does not contain Web service discovery information.
At line:1 char:9
+ $soap = New-WebServiceProxy -Uri $uri
    +         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    + CategoryInfo          : InvalidOperation: (http://localhos...sx:Uri) [New-WebServiceProxy], InvalidOperationException
    + FullyQualifiedErrorId : InvalidOperationException,Microsoft.PowerShell.Commands.NewWebServiceProxy

But, as I said, this is based on working code, so it is unlikely anything is wrong at the server end. As a test, type

$WebResponse = Invoke-WebRequest -UseDefaultCredential $url

$WebResponse

And I get:

StatusCode        : 200
StatusDescription : OK
Content           : `<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

                    <!-- SOAP API definitions -->
                    <definitions name="SOAPAPI"

Which is what I would expect - it's start of the header of the WSDL.

I'm not seeing what's going wrong, does anyone have any suggestions?

  • A stab in the dark: does adding ?wsdl to the value of $uri help? – mklement0 Aug 30 at 3:11
  • In this case, no. We know the uri is correct - it is what is generated by the existing Perl code, and we get the WSDL back as content in the Invoke-WebRequest. – mikb Aug 30 at 4:02
  • 1
    Is your variable $uri or $url? The error is different from your code – Scepticalist Aug 30 at 4:20
  • Have you looked at this article? stackoverflow.com/questions/27793078/… – Scepticalist Aug 30 at 4:35
  • sorry, there's a typo there. The variable is $url, and it is conisitent in my PS history. – mikb Aug 30 at 6:18
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Short answer - give up. It doesn't work. As a workaround, download the WSDL using Invoke-WebRequest -OutFile (that's important) and invoke New-Webserviceproxy with a local file Uri. If you need authentication, set the Credentials or UseDefaultCredentials property manually as appropriate (setting the parameters to New-Webserviceproxy does not have any effect). It now works, but I have to conclude that the underlying .Net c# code was never tested with anything but MS services....

Anyway, this was the solution:


        <#
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
        Phase 1: Download the service description (WSDL)

        We ought to be able to simply invoke the New-WebProxyService cmdlet with
        the URI of the service description, but that consistently fails, possibly because
        this is not a .Net application.

        So the workaround is to download the service description to a temporary file, and
        load that in New-WebServiceProxy as a file::/// URI
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    #>

        $tmp = New-TemporaryFile
        $tmpName = $tmp.FullName

        # Splatting all the parameters to the cmdlet is more readable than a mix of command line
        # and splatted parameters 
        $wsdlArgs = @{
            Uri = -join ($uri,'?trid=', $service)
            OutFile = $tmpName
            PassThru = $true
            ErrorAction = 'Stop'
        }
        if ($Credential -eq [System.Management.Automation.PSCredential]::Empty) {
            $wsdlArgs['UseDefaultCredentials'] = $true
        }
        else {
            $wsdlArgs['Credential'] = $Credential
        }
        $wsdlResponse = Invoke-WebRequest @wsdlArgs # No try/catch here - if it fails, we fail!

    <#
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
        Phase 2: Create a WebServiceProxy Object

        We use try {} / finally {} to ensure that whether our cmdlet succeeds or fails,
        we clean up our mess...
    -----------------------------------------------------------------
    #>

        # Splatting all the parameters to the cmdlet is more readable than a mix of command line
        # and splatted parameters 
        $soapArgs = @{
            Uri         = ([System.Uri]($tmpName)).AbsoluteUri
            Class       = 'SOAPAPI'
            Namespace   = "www.kambe.com.au"
            ErrorAction = 'Stop'
        }
        try {
            $soap = New-WebServiceProxy @soapArgs # No catch block, if the cmdlet fails, we fail!
        }
        finally { # Whether the cmdlet succeeds or fails, we remove the temp file
            Remove-Item $tmpName -Force
        }

        # It seems the Credential and UseDefaultCredential params are ignored by New-WebServiceProxy if not used?
        # Programming pragmatism: it works this way, and not any other way
        if ($Credential -eq [System.Management.Automation.PSCredential]::Empty) {
            $soap.UseDefaultCredentials = $true
        }
        else {
            $soap.Credentials = $Credential
        }

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