3
mutex m;
void thread_function()
{
    static int i = 0;

    for(int j =0; j<1000; j++)
    {
        { //this scope should make this ineffective according to my understanding
        lock_guard<mutex> lock(m);
        }
        i++;

       cout<<i<<endl;
    }
}

I call this function from 2 threads. Hence the expected value of int i is 1000*2 = 2000 if the function behaves in thread-safe fashion.

Without the mutex, the result varies from 1990 to 2000 as expected when printing i (due to non atomic int i). Inserting the lock guard without the scoped block prevents this.

However, by my understanding, having the scoped block around it should make it acquire and release the lock immediatly, hence there is no longer thread safety when writing to int i. However, I notice i to be 2000 always. Am I misunderstanding something?

6
  • 1
    The lock/unlock will cause synchronisation so updates are seen. However the race condition still exists and specified to cause UB. Aug 30, 2019 at 7:16
  • but there is no lock during the write stage, and I do not observe any race condition over multiple runs despite the scoped block. This is not the case when I remove the mutex entirely from the code, when i is sometimes less than 2000 Aug 30, 2019 at 7:22
  • I don’t see where and how your code modifies 'i', but the lock+unlock sequence slows down the thread; So that the other thread might get a chance to finish its task before this thread unlocks. But that is only chance, and you will be in trouble if you count on it.
    – Red.Wave
    Aug 30, 2019 at 7:31
  • A race condition is not something you observe in a running program, it's when the result depends on a particular order of execution. Your program has undefined behaviour.
    – molbdnilo
    Aug 30, 2019 at 7:35
  • 2
    If I get the question correctly, you start that piece of code in two threads and due to the lost update problem, the result is not 2000 as it would be in correct code, but slightly less (as you wrote, 1990 to 2000). Is this understanding correct? If yes, I suggest you add a hint that you start the piece of code in exactly two threads and that the expected result from code without any data race is 2000. Aug 30, 2019 at 7:52

2 Answers 2

6

Your understanding is correct and that the result is always 2000 is probably machine-dependent. The reason could be that the synchronization just before the i++ statement on your machine happens to always cause the threads to execute it with sufficient distance in time to avoid the race condition. However, as said, this is not guaranteed.

0
2

As others have already told you, the issue is that your i++ is so close to the thread synchronization that it (practically always) manages to do the update before the thread is preempted.

If we change your program like this:

#include <iostream>
#include <thread>
#include <mutex>

std::mutex m;
void thread_function()
{
    static int i = 0;

    for (int j = 0; j < 1000; j++)
    {
        { //this scope should make this ineffective according to my understanding
            std::lock_guard<std::mutex> lock(m);
        }
        std::cout << "Printing some stuff. Weee!" << std::endl; // <- New line
        i++;

        std::cout << i << std::endl;
    }
}

int main()
{
    std::thread t1(thread_function);
    std::thread t2(thread_function);
    t1.join();
    t2.join();
    return 0;
}

Then sometimes the two threads will no longer sum to 2000. You will still hit the race condition less often than if the lock wasn't there, but this just shows a major danger with race conditions and undefined behavior: Your program can actually work most of the time, even if it is strictly wrong according to the standard.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.