25

How would I do this in Ruby?

p "abc".all_possible_permutations

Would return:

[
  "abc",
  "acb",
  "bca",
  "bac",
  "cba",
  "cab",
]

Edit

Thanks to Jakub Hampl:

class String
  def all_possible_permutations
    self.chars.to_a.permutation.map(&:join)
  end
end
  • Did you mean to have four characters in your input string? Based on your example it should just be "abc".all_possible_permutations – Chris Lutz Apr 24 '11 at 23:36
  • Did you get this in an interview question? I got this one time and I think to answer it within 2, 3 minutes is not so realistic. It is one of those either you know the answer, or takes more than 2, 3 minutes – 太極者無極而生 Apr 24 '11 at 23:39
  • No, just fooling around. Good to know I could be asked this, though! =p – RyanScottLewis Apr 24 '11 at 23:41
  • @動靜能量 it's not hard when you know the stdlib well. – Jakub Hampl Apr 24 '11 at 23:42
  • I almost always have to look up methods from Enumerable. Quite confusing until you use them all the time. – RyanScottLewis Apr 25 '11 at 3:20
30
%w[a b c].permutation.map &:join
  • Very nice solution! – Amokrane Chentir Apr 24 '11 at 23:43
  • 6
    Also if you're starting with a string: "abc".chars.to_a.permutation.map &:join. – Jakub Hampl Apr 24 '11 at 23:43
10

If someone doesnt want to use inbuilt function :

def permute(result,input)
  if(input.length == 0)
    return
  end

  if(input.length == 1)
    puts result + input[0]
    return
  end

  if(input.length == 2)
    puts result + input[0] + input[1]
    puts result + input[1] + input[0]
    return
  end

  (0...input.length).step(1).each do |i|
    firstpart = result+input[i]
    secondpart = (i > 0 ? input[0..(i-1)] : '') + (input[(i+1)..-1] || '')
    permute(firstpart,secondpart)
  end
end

permute('',gets.chomp)
  • why is this method taking in a result parameter? – Steven Aguilar Oct 25 '17 at 4:17
  • 'result' is the one which holds the resulting permutation at that moment for some length, and when its length becomes equal to length of input, that means we got one permutation of input. – mdev Oct 25 '17 at 8:18
3

One line:

p "abc".chars.permutation.map &:join

Sample output:

["abc", "acb", "bac", "bca", "cab", "cba"] 
  • p is optional
  • string could be a variable instead
  • chars is pretty quick, it separates the string into an array of single characters
  • map has tons of cool applications,it takes a object, and returns it after the block is done, in this case the operation join
  • &:join could be replaced with { |i| i.join } like this:

    p "abc".chars.permutation.map{ |i| i.join }

1

If anyone wants to have the code for this using basic algorithms, here is how you do it-

    $count = 0
def permute(permuted_string, original_string, done_array)
        if permuted_string.length == original_string.length
                $count = $count+1
                puts "#{$count}  #{permuted_string}"
        else
                (0..original_string.length-1).each do |i|
                        if !done_array[i]
                                done_array[i] = true
                                permute(permuted_string+original_string[i], original_string, done_array)
                                done_array[i] = false
                        end

                end
        end
end
puts "Please enter the string for permutations"

input = gets.chomp
done_array = Array.new(input.length, false)
permute("", input, done_array)

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