1

I need to create operations for an operation sequence. The operations share the following behaviour. They can be evaluated, and at construction they can either be parametrized by a single i32 (eg. Sum) or not parametrized at all (eg. Id).

I create a trait Operation. The evaluate part is trivial.

trait Operation {
    fn evaluate(&self, operand: i32) -> i32;
}

But I don't know how to describe the second demand. The first option is to simply let concrete implementations of Operation handle that behaviour.

pub struct Id {}

impl Id {
    pub fn new() -> Id {
        Id {}
    }
}

impl Operation for Id {
    fn evaluate(&self, operand: i32) -> i32 {
        operand
    }
}

pub struct Sum {
    augend: i32,
}

impl Sum {
    pub fn new(augend: i32) -> Sum {
        Sum { augend }
    }
}

impl Operation for Sum {
    fn evaluate(&self, addend: i32) -> i32 {
        augend + addend
    }
}

Second option is a new function that takes an optional i32. Then the concrete implementations deal with the possibly redundant input. I find this worse than the first option.

trait Operation {
    fn evaluate(&self, operand: i32) -> i32;
    fn new(parameter: std::Option<i32>)
}

Google has lead me to mutually exclusive traits: https://github.com/rust-lang/rust/issues/51774. It seems promising, but it doesn't quite solve my problem.

Is there a way to achieve this behaviour?

trait Operation = Evaluate + (ParametrizedInit or UnparametrizedInit)
3

How about you use an associated type to define the initialization data?

trait Operation {
    type InitData;
    fn init(data: Self::InitData) -> Self;

    fn evaluate(&self, operand: i32) -> i32;
}

impl Operation for Id {
    type InitData = ();
    fn init(_: Self::InitData) -> Self {
        Id {}
    }

    fn evaluate(&self, operand: i32) -> i32 {
        operand
    }
}

impl Operation for Sum {
    type InitData = i32;
    fn init(augend: Self::InitData) -> Self {
        Sum { augend }
    }

    fn evaluate(&self, addend: i32) -> i32 {
        augend + addend
    }
}

For the Id case you specify () to say that the initialization does not need data. It's still a bit meh to call Operation::init(()), but I think the trait at least captures the logic fairly well.


To actually get mutually exclusive traits (which is apparently what you want), you have to use some workaround. The Rust language does not support mutually exclusive traits per-se. But you can use associated types and some marker types to get something similar. This is a bit strange, but works for now.

trait InitMarker {}

enum InitFromNothingMarker {}
enum InitFromI32Marker {}

impl InitMarker for InitFromNothingMarker {}
impl InitMarker for InitFromI32Marker {}

trait Operation {
    type InitData: InitMarker;

    fn init() -> Self
    where
        Self: Operation<InitData = InitFromNothingMarker>;
    fn init_from(v: i32) -> Self
    where
        Self: Operation<InitData = InitFromI32Marker>;
}

trait UnparametrizedInit: Operation<InitData = InitFromNothingMarker> {}
trait ParametrizedInit: Operation<InitData = InitFromI32Marker> {}

impl<T: Operation<InitData = InitFromNothingMarker>> UnparametrizedInit for T {}
impl<T: Operation<InitData = InitFromI32Marker>> ParametrizedInit for T {}

(Ideally you want to have a Sealed trait that is defined in a private submodule of your crate. That way, no one (except for you) can implement the trait. And then make Sealed a super trait for InitMarker.)

This is quite a bit of code, but at least you can make sure that implementors of Operation implement exactly one of ParametrizedInit and UnparametrizedInit.

In the future, you will likely be able to replace the marker types with an enum and the associated type with an associated const. But currently, "const generics" are not finished enough, so we have to take the ugly route by using marker types. I'm actually discussing these solutions in my master's thesis (section 4.2, just search for "mutually exclusive").

  • It's still on whoever is writing the concrete operation to obey the specification. I thought about something like this with a trait InitData that defines a get() -> Option<i32>. And exposing concrete types that implement the trait and convey the logic. Wasn't happy with it :D – Antonio Dropulić Sep 1 at 22:38
  • @AntonioDropulić So all types that implement Operation should in fact either be constructible from nothing or from an i32? No other choices? – Lukas Kalbertodt Sep 1 at 22:40
  • That is the how the task was worded. It is not a real world assigment. Just practice :D – Antonio Dropulić Sep 1 at 22:41
  • @AntonioDropulić I edited my answer to include a general solution to what you are asking. Sorry for the quick'n'dirty writing style right now! – Lukas Kalbertodt Sep 1 at 22:56
  • 1
    Exactly! UnparametrizedInit and ParametrizedInit are more or less just for convenience. Instead of them you could also just use Operation<InitData = /* ... */> as trait bound. The two traits are the mutually exclusive traits (the title of your question). And yes, the need to implement both init and init_from despite only one being callable is annoying (see there Q&A). I use this trick in a method of mine and have a bunch of methods with unreachable!() body because of that :/ But it will likely be improved soon. – Lukas Kalbertodt Sep 6 at 13:19

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