8

I have been trying to find a way to continue my for loop to the previous element. Its hard to explain.

Just two be clear, here is an example:-

foo = ["a", "b", "c", "d"]

for bar in foo:
    if bar == "c":
        foo[foo.index(bar)] = "abc"
        continue
    print(bar)

On executing this, when the loop reaches to 'c', it sees that bar is equal to 'c', it replaces that 'c' in the list, continues to the next element & doesn't print bar. I want this to loop back to 'b' after replacing when the if condition is true. So it will print 'b' again and it will be just like the loop never reached 'c'

Background: I am working on a project. If any error occurs, I have to continue from the previous element to solve this error.

Here is a flowchart, if it can help:

Flow chart

I prefer not to modify my existing list except for the replacing I made. I tried searching through every different keywords but didn't found similar result.

How do I continue the loop from the previous element of the current one?
  • Just use a while loop? – user202729 Sep 2 '19 at 5:05
  • 1
    Use a while loop. For loops in python are very different than for loops in other languages. It's actually like a foreach loop. – Diptangsu Goswami Sep 2 '19 at 5:14
  • Do you want to print a, b, b, abc, d? – user10732646 Sep 2 '19 at 5:15
  • @joumaico Exactly. But note that it is not my main purpose. It is just an example – Black Thunder Sep 2 '19 at 5:15
  • As I understood you want to print a , b ,b , abc, d? the first b is the second element and the second b is the element after going back one step and finally "abc" is what changed with "c" ? – Aragon S Sep 2 '19 at 5:19
6

Here when the corresponding value of i is equal to c the element will change to your request and go back one step, reprinting b and abc, and finally d:

foo = ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
i = 0
while i < len(foo):
    if foo[i] == "c":
        foo[i] = "abc"
        i -= 1
        continue
    print(foo[i])
    i += 1
|improve this answer|||||
  • I never talked about while in my question and all the answers are using while. – Black Thunder Sep 2 '19 at 5:41
  • 1
    you cannot use for because it cannot help you! – Aragon S Sep 2 '19 at 5:42
  • No. I can use for. I answered my own question. I knew there must be a way. I am not going to undo acceptance of your answer, but I want you to take a look at it. – Black Thunder Sep 5 '19 at 9:40
3

In a for loop you cannot change the iterator. Use a while loop instead:

foo = ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
i = 0
while i < len(foo):
    if foo[i] == "c":
        foo[foo.index(foo[i])] = "abc"
        i -= 1
        continue
    print(foo[i])
    i += 1    
|improve this answer|||||
  • Will break if the first element in the list matches! – Sam Daniel Sep 2 '19 at 5:16
  • I commend this answer. – user10732646 Sep 2 '19 at 5:16
  • @SamDaniel I agree, but it comes from the defenition of the problem, not from the answer. – Aryerez Sep 2 '19 at 5:18
0
import collections
left, right = -1,1
foo = collections.deque(["a", "b", "c", "d"])
end = foo[-1]
while foo[0] != end:
    if foo[0] == 'c':
        foo[0] = 'abc'
        foo.rotate(right)
    else:
        print(foo[0])
        foo.rotate(left)
print(foo[0])
|improve this answer|||||
0

I wanted to use for so I created the code myself. I didn't want to modify my original list so I made a copy of my original list

foo = ["a", "b", "c", "d"]
foobar = foo.copy()

for bar in foobar:
    if bar == "c":
        foobar[foobar.index(bar)] = "abc"
        foo[foo.index(bar)] = "abc"
        del foobar[foobar.index("abc")+1:]
        foobar += foo[foo.index("abc")-1:]
        continue
    print(bar)

It prints as expected:

a
b
b
abc
d

And my original list also is now:

['a', 'b', 'abc', 'd']
|improve this answer|||||

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