52

I need to initialize all elements of a std::array with a constant value, like it can be done with std::vector.

#include <vector>
#include <array>

int main()
{
  std::vector<int> v(10, 7);    // OK
  std::array<int, 10> a(7);     // does not compile, pretty frustrating
}

Is there a way to do this elegantly?

Right now I'm using this:

std::array<int, 10> a;
for (auto & v : a)
  v = 7;

but I'd like to avoid using explicit code for the initialisation.

1

8 Answers 8

39

With std::index_sequence, you might do:

namespace detail
{
    template <typename T, std::size_t ... Is>
    constexpr std::array<T, sizeof...(Is)>
    create_array(T value, std::index_sequence<Is...>)
    {
        // cast Is to void to remove the warning: unused value
        return {{(static_cast<void>(Is), value)...}};
    }
}

template <std::size_t N, typename T>
constexpr std::array<T, N> create_array(const T& value)
{
    return detail::create_array(value, std::make_index_sequence<N>());
}

With usage

auto a = create_array<10 /*, int*/>(7); // auto is std::array<int, 10>

Which, contrary to std::fill solution, handle non default constructible types.

6
  • This is the most elegant solution for my needs. Very similar to the non compiling std::array<int, 10> a(7) which becomes auto a = create_array<10, int>(7) or even auto a = create_array<10>(7) Sep 2, 2019 at 13:03
  • What's the difference of all this to just a method with a foreach inside? Sep 4, 2019 at 22:26
  • 4
    @mFeinstein: "contrary to std::fill solution, handle non default constructible type.".
    – Jarod42
    Sep 4, 2019 at 22:28
  • So std::fill is a foreach? Sep 4, 2019 at 22:30
  • Your foreach or for-range to set value would be equivalent to what fill will do.
    – Jarod42
    Sep 4, 2019 at 22:32
35

Alas not; std::array supports aggregate initialisation but that's not enough here.

Fortunately you can use std::fill, or even std::array<T,N>::fill, which, from C++20 is elegant as the latter becomes constexpr.

Reference: https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/container/array/fill

29

You can do as following

std::array<int, 10> a; 
a.fill(2/*or any other value*/);

Or use std::fill from algorithms header file. To include algorithms header file use

#include <algorithm>
4
  • 1
    Thanks for taking the time to write out the actual code. This is something I don't do often enough: Stack Overflow works best when there are multiple answers to choose from.
    – Bathsheba
    Sep 2, 2019 at 12:08
  • @Bathsheba no problem mate) Sep 2, 2019 at 12:09
  • @Bathsheba I am writing this from a phone so I haven't seen that you already answered the question Sep 2, 2019 at 12:11
  • I'm glad - you should answer answer a question if you believe you have something to say that, perhaps, hasn't already been said. I think this answer is more useful in some ways than mine.
    – Bathsheba
    Sep 2, 2019 at 12:12
6

Since C++17 you can write a constexpr function to efficiently set up the array, since the element accessors are constexpr now. This method will also work for various other schemes of setting up initial values:

#include <array>

template<typename T, size_t N>
constexpr auto make_array(T value) -> std::array<T, N>
{
    std::array<T, N> a{};
    for (auto& x : a)
        x = value;
    return a;
}

int main()
{
    auto arr = make_array<int, 10>(7);
}
5
  • 3
    Requires default constructible T though.
    – Jarod42
    Sep 4, 2019 at 22:24
  • Also, no need to value initialize the std::array before initializing with value.
    – ggg
    Dec 26, 2023 at 17:58
  • @ggg no harm in following good general habits
    – M.M
    Dec 28, 2023 at 21:03
  • @M.M You don't pay for what you don't use.
    – ggg
    Dec 30, 2023 at 19:39
  • @ggg you do pay for errors due to uninitialized variables in other situations
    – M.M
    Dec 30, 2023 at 23:05
4

As said before, the fill solution doesn't work for non-default constructible types. The index_sequence solution is correct but a bit verbose.

Given a value t (of any type) and a compile constant N, the following evaluates to the desired solution in one line.

std::apply([&](auto... dummy) {return std::array{(dummy, t)...};}, std::array<int, N>{});

See full code here: https://godbolt.org/z/jcq4fqMsE

This solution can be applied to C++17 and with some modifications to earlier C++ versions.

2

The std::array type is an aggregate that supports list-initialization:

std::array<int, 10> a{2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2};

It also supports aggregate-initialization:

std::array<int, 10> a = {2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2, 2};

This is inconvenient and error-prone for long arrays, and you would be better off using a solution like Jarod42’s for those.

2
  • 4
    This is inconvenient and error-prone for any array length. Sep 3, 2019 at 8:51
  • 3
    @Jabberwocky The accepted answer is great and I upvoted it. It’s also kind of overkill for an array of three elements. The others don’t work for a constexpr std::array. So this technique is sometimes appropriate.
    – Davislor
    Sep 3, 2019 at 16:33
1

From C++20 the ranges have fill

std::array<int, 10> a2;
std::ranges::fill(a2, 10);

Also, if the array is a small (for larger ones it may look odd), from C++17 (argument deduction)

auto a = std::array{2,2,2,2};
0

This can be done fairly easily by creating a function template that return the required array as shown below. It is even possible to initialize the array at compile time!(see the c++17 example demo given at the end of the answer).

template<std::size_t N> std::array<int, N> make_array(int val)
{
    std::array<int, N> tempArray{};    //create local array
    for(int &elem:tempArray)           //populate it 
    {
        elem = val;                     
    }
    return tempArray;                   //return it
}
int main()
{
    //---------------------V-------->number of elements  
    auto arr  = make_array<10>(7);
    //------------------------^---->value of element to be initialized with

    
    //lets confirm if all objects have the expected value 
    for(const auto &elem: arr)
    {
        std::cout << elem << std::endl; //prints all 7 
    }
    
}

Demo


Note also that it is even possible to do this at compile time with C++17. Demo C++17

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