11

When I try to compile this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <limits.h>

// End recursive template-expansion of function select below.
template <typename Type>
static inline constexpr Type select(unsigned index)
{ return Type(); }

// Select one of the items passed to it.
// e.g. select(0, a, b, c) = a; select(1, a, b, c) = b; etc.
template <typename Type, typename... Params>
[[gnu::always_inline]]
static inline constexpr Type select(unsigned index, Type value, Params... values)
{ return index == 0 ? value : select<Type>(index - 1, values...); }

template <typename Type>
[[gnu::always_inline]]
static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_1(Type mask, Type shift, Type value)
{ return ((value & mask) >> shift) | ((value << shift) & mask); }

template <typename Type>
[[gnu::always_inline]]
static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_0(unsigned i, Type value)
{
  return i == 0
    ? value
    : reflect_mask_helper_0(
        i - 1,
        reflect_mask_helper_1<Type>(
          select(i - 1, 0xaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, 0xcccccccccccccccc, 0xf0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0,
                        0xff00ff00ff00ff00, 0xffff0000ffff0000, 0xffffffff00000000),
          1 << (i - 1),
          value));
}

template <typename Type>
[[gnu::flatten]]
static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask(Type value)
{ return reflect_mask_helper_0(__builtin_ctz(sizeof(Type) * CHAR_BIT), value); }

int main(void) {
  for (int i = 0; i < 65536; i++) {
    std::cout << reflect_mask<uint16_t>(i) << std::endl;
  }
}

gcc gives me an error saying the function reflect_mask_helper_0 cannot be inlined because it is recursive. However, the function select is also recursive, but gcc inlines it without complaining. What am I missing here?

(I need it to be recursive, since constexpr functions cannot contain loops under C++11.)

Error message:

% g++ test.cpp -O3 -march=native -c
test.cpp: In function ‘constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_0(unsigned int, Type) [with Type = short unsigned int]’:
test.cpp:23:30: error: inlining failed in call to always_inline ‘constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_0(unsigned int, Type) [with Type = short unsigned int]’: recursive inlining
   23 | static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_0(unsigned i, Type value)
      |                              ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
test.cpp:27:28: note: called from here
   27 |     : reflect_mask_helper_0(
      |       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^
   28 |         i - 1,
      |         ~~~~~~              
   29 |         reflect_mask_helper_1<Type>(
      |         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   30 |           select(i - 1, 0xaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, 0xcccccccccccccccc, 0xf0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0,
      |           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   31 |                         0xff00ff00ff00ff00, 0xffff0000ffff0000, 0xffffffff00000000),
      |                         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   32 |           1 << (i - 1),
      |           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~     
   33 |           value));
      |           ~~~~~~~           
test.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
test.cpp:23:30: error: inlining failed in call to always_inline ‘constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_0(unsigned int, Type) [with Type = short unsigned int]’: recursive inlining
   23 | static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_0(unsigned i, Type value)
      |                              ^~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
test.cpp:27:28: note: called from here
   27 |     : reflect_mask_helper_0(
      |       ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~^
   28 |         i - 1,
      |         ~~~~~~              
   29 |         reflect_mask_helper_1<Type>(
      |         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   30 |           select(i - 1, 0xaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, 0xcccccccccccccccc, 0xf0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0,
      |           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   31 |                         0xff00ff00ff00ff00, 0xffff0000ffff0000, 0xffffffff00000000),
      |                         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
   32 |           1 << (i - 1),
      |           ~~~~~~~~~~~~~     
   33 |           value));
      |           ~~~~~~~
  • If you turn i into a generic parameter and provide a non-recursive specialization for 0, it should be possible to inline – grek40 Sep 3 at 6:05
  • Not sure which version you used, I tried it on g++ (Ubuntu 4.8.4-2ubuntu1~14.04.4) 4.8.4 and it compiled without any errors/warnings. – sklott Sep 3 at 6:21
  • @sklott, I’m using gcc 9.1.0 in Arch Linux. – André von Kugland Sep 3 at 6:26
  • You know, a solution belongs in the answer section. To put it in the question is just confusing. I suggest you post it as an answer and self-accept. No hard feelings. – StoryTeller Sep 3 at 7:30
13

select doesn't actually calls itself. It pops the front of the type list it received and then calls another specialization of select<Type, ...>. The trailing parameter pack is different. Since that "recursion" is essentially a finite set of nested function calls (different functions), GCC can see right through it, regardless of the run-time parameter.

But reflect_mask_helper_0 does call itself, with the same template arguments, indefinitely. GCC has no way to tell how deep this run-time recursion will go at run-time. Recall that a constexpr function is still a regular function that must be invocable at run-time.

  • Indeed, it calls itself, but why can’t it see that reflect_mask_helper_0 always stops? As a matter of fact, looking the code it generated when I removed [[gnu::always_inline]], it did indeed inline the call to reflect_mask_helper_0 inside main(), but it also kept the unreferenced non-inlined code, which was the reason I tried adding [[gnu::always_inline]]. – André von Kugland Sep 3 at 6:00
  • 1
    @AndrévonKugland - I suspect it's due to contexpr functions having to be executable at run-time. They are regular functions. When not in the context of a constant expression, GCC has no way to know how deep the recursion will be. So it cannot inline it. In essence, GCC has to be able to apply the attribute in both a runtime and compile time context to accept it. – StoryTeller Sep 3 at 6:03
  • Yes. When I call this function with constant expression parameters, GCC doesn’t complain about [[gnu::always_inline]]. The problem I was trying to solve was that without the [[gnu::always_inline]], the function is actually inlined when called in main(), but both the object file and the final executable file still contain an unused non-inlined version of the function. – André von Kugland Sep 3 at 6:12
  • 2
    @AndrévonKugland - Try adding an unnamed namespace around the whole thing. Templates and internal linkage specifiers sometimes don't gel all the way. If the compiler can truly prove it's unused in other TU's, it may be able to ditch the dead code. – StoryTeller Sep 3 at 6:15
  • "GCC has no way to tell how deep this run-time recursion will go.". It's not true. Depth is 4, can be easily seen at compile-time. – geza Sep 3 at 7:25
4

If you check out the resulting assembly code, if you remove the always_inline and flatten attributes, you can see that gcc actually inlines everything correctly.

So, this issue is a QoI thing. Maybe, at that point, when always_inline handled, it cannot be inlined (hence the error message), but gcc decides to inline it afterwards anyways.

Btw., you can finetune gcc, and with a little modification to your code, gcc can compile it:

  • pass --param max-early-inliner-iterations=3 to gcc
  • remove the flatten attribute (no idea, why it matters...)

(So, actually, this issue has nothing to do with recursive calls - from the compiler standpoint, it doesn't matter whether the function is recursive, or not, it just follows the flow of the code - to a certain extent, of course. Here, recursive depth is just 4, it is not too hard to follow for a compiler)

4

Here’s the solution I’ve found, thanks to grek40’s comment and to StoryTeller’s answer.

(As for my previous problem with the unused function template instance left in the compiled binary, I solved it by compiling the original code — without the gnu::always_inline and gnu::flatten attributes — with the arguments -ffunction-sections -fdata-sections -Wl,--gc-sections.)

Now reflect_mask_helper_0 is inside a struct (because C++ doesn’t allow partial specialization of function templates), and the i parameter of the function became the Index parameter of the struct template.

#include <iostream>
#include <limits.h>

// End recursive template-expansion of function select below.
template <typename Type>
static inline constexpr Type select(unsigned index)
{ return Type(); }

// Select one of the items passed to it.
// e.g. select(0, a, b, c) = a; select(1, a, b, c) = b; etc.
template <typename Type, typename... Params>
[[gnu::always_inline]]
static inline constexpr Type select(unsigned index, Type value, Params... values)
{ return index == 0 ? value : select<Type>(index - 1, values...); }

template <typename Type>
[[gnu::always_inline]]
static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask_helper_1(Type mask, Type shift, Type value)
{ return ((value & mask) >> shift) | ((value << shift) & mask); }

template <typename Type, unsigned Index>
struct reflect_mask_helper_0
{
  [[gnu::always_inline]]
  static inline constexpr Type invoke(Type value)
  {
    return reflect_mask_helper_0<Type, Index - 1>::call(
      reflect_mask_helper_1<Type>(
        static_cast<Type>(select(Index - 1,
          0xaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa, 0xcccccccccccccccc, 0xf0f0f0f0f0f0f0f0,
          0xff00ff00ff00ff00, 0xffff0000ffff0000, 0xffffffff00000000)),
        1 << (Index - 1),
        value));
  }
};

template <typename Type>
struct reflect_mask_helper_0<Type, 0>
{
  [[gnu::always_inline]]
  static inline constexpr Type invoke(Type value) { return value; }
};

template <typename Type>
static inline constexpr Type reflect_mask(Type value)
{ return reflect_mask_helper_0<Type, __builtin_ctz(sizeof(Type) * CHAR_BIT)>::invoke(value); }

int main(void) {
  for (int i = 0; i < 65536; i++) {
    std::cout << reflect_mask<uint16_t>(i) << std::endl;
  }
}

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