6

My understanding is that Thread.Abort should raise a ThreadAbortException on a blocked thread, however this does not seem to be the case when dealing with TcpListener.AcceptSocket. Here's the most basic illustration of the issue:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Thread thread = new Thread(Listen);
        thread.Start();
        Thread.Sleep(1000); // give it a second to get going
        Console.WriteLine("Aborting listener thread");
        thread.Abort();
        thread.Join();
        Console.WriteLine("Listener thread finished press <enter> to end app.");
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
    static void Listen()
    {
        try
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Starting to listen");
            TcpListener listener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 4070);
            listener.Start();
            Socket socket = listener.AcceptSocket();
            Console.WriteLine("Connected!");
            return;
        }
        catch (ThreadAbortException exception)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Abort requested");
        }
    }
}

The thread.Abort() call should stop the AcceptSocket and execute the ThreadAbortException handler. Howerver this does not happen.

Swapping out my Listen wrapper of AcceptSocket for ListenAsync which calls BeginAcceptSocket instead:

static void ListenAsync()
    {
        try
        {
            ManualResetEvent clientConnected = new ManualResetEvent(false);

            Console.WriteLine("Starting to listen");
            TcpListener listener = new TcpListener(IPAddress.Any, 4070);
            listener.Start();
            clientConnected.Reset();
            var iasyncResult = listener.BeginAcceptSocket((ar) =>
            {
                Socket socket = listener.EndAcceptSocket(ar);
                Console.WriteLine("Connected!");
                clientConnected.Set();
            }, null);
            clientConnected.WaitOne();

            return;
        }
        catch (ThreadAbortException exception)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Abort requested");
        }
    }

In this case it "appears" to work fine. The ThreadAbortException is caught while the thread is doing a WaitOne. HOWEVER the thread that was created by the call to BeginAcceptSocket is still running and able to accept a socket (I verified this by opening that port with Telnet)

Finally, I added Listener.Stop as part of the TheadAbortException handler, and a try catch around the EndAcceptSocket call (since the socket is disposed by the Stop)

Is this really the best approach starting and stopping the process of listening for socket connections?

2
  • What happens with the clientConnected event when you kill the thread? Why aren't you disposing of objects? What do you do with the socket once accepted? Apr 25 '11 at 12:26
  • Using Thread.Abort is almost always a dirty hack and should be avoided. Let your threads terminate gracefully... don't pull the rug from under them.
    – spender
    Apr 25 '11 at 12:56
7

The reason that Thread.Abort doesn't abort a thread that's listening on a socket is because that thread is blocked inside (the moral equivalent of) a listen() kernel call. The ThreadAbortException can only be raised by the CLR when the CLR is actually executing, and during a call to listen thread is actually stuck inside an unmanaged system call. Once the call to listen returns and the execution resumes inside the CLR, the thread abortion can be continued.

I second the advice not to use Thread.Abort(). If you do decide to go that route, you can use a technique similar to the one in your second example. However, you'd be better off using a different method and simply calling Listener.Stop() when you want to shut down the thread listener.

2
  • 1
    I'm not sure what's wrong with Thead.Abort(), however I'm happy to heed the advice and will investigate other options. Apr 25 '11 at 13:01
  • 3
    @Ralph: From a broad perspective, Thread.Abort has issues because: a) (as you see here), it gives the false perception that the target thread will immediately (or even soon) be aborted, but the CLR is at the mercy of unmanaged code, and b) it is destructive and there is no telling what state the thread will be in when it's aborted. It's strongly recommended that you instead use a cancellation/abort flag of some kind and use blocking methods with timeouts when possible. This way you can check your cancellation flag and do whatever cleanup (if any) that's appropriate at the time. Apr 25 '11 at 13:05

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