1

The goal is to create something like this:

.square {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-image: linear-gradient(45deg, purple 50%, gray 50%);
}
<div class="square"></div>

With a square it's easy, as we know that if we make a line from the two corners in front of each other, it will close 45deg with the side next of it. But what if we don't know the width and height of the element, but we want to keep the effect? Just a logic, but maybe it helps to find the solution: the effect could be earned with a square transform(scale)-d to the required parameters, but the problem still exists: we don't know those parameters. Another logic: if the gradient would be an image, (with worse quality) with background-size, it could be stretched.

Any ideas?

2

Yep, there’s a syntax for corners!

.square {
  width: 200px;
  height: 100px;
  background-image: linear-gradient(to top right, purple 50%, gray 50%);
}
<div class="square"></div>

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2

Maybe you can try using clip-path with :after and ':before' pseudo class.

.square {
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  position: relative;
}

.rectangle {
  margin-top: 1em;
  width: 100px;
  height: 200px;
  position: relative;
}

.square:after {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background: grey;
  clip-path: polygon(100% 100%, 0 0, 100% 0);
}

.square:before {
  content: '';
  position: absolute;
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background: purple;
  clip-path: polygon(100% 100%, 0 0, 0 100%);
}
<div class="square"></div>

<div class="rectangle square"></div>

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