1

Here is a working Rust function:

fn foo(src: &[u8]) -> Vec<u8> {
    let dst_len = (src.len() / 3) * 4;
    let mut dst = vec![0 as u8; dst_len];

    let mut si = 0;
    let mut di = 0;
    let n = (src.len() / 3) * 3;
    for _ in (0 .. n).step_by(3) {
        let v = bar(src[si], src[si+1], src[si+2]);
        dst[di+0] = baz(v, 0);
        dst[di+1] = baz(v, 1);
        dst[di+2] = baz(v, 2);
        dst[di+3] = baz(v, 3);
        si += 3;
        di += 4;
    }

    dst
}

It works but that loop doesn't seem like idiomatic Rust. It indexes into arrays using manually managed indices, pretty much like a for loop in C.

Is there a way to achieve the same result using Rust iterators? I think chunked_exact would work for iterating over src, but what about dst? What iterator could I zip with src.chunked_exact to write into dst in chunks?

1
  • What do you want to do with the reminder? Can you edit the question with that?
    – Boiethios
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 12:10

2 Answers 2

3

What is "idiomatic" can be a matter of opinion, but you can make use of more iterator methods, like zip and chunks_exact_mut:

fn foo(src: &[u8]) -> Vec<u8> {
    let dst_len = (src.len() / 3) * 4;
    let mut dst = vec![0 as u8; dst_len];
    for (s, d) in src.chunks_exact(3).zip(dst.chunks_exact_mut(4)) {
        let v = bar(s[0], s[1], s[2]);
        d[0] = baz(v, 0);
        d[1] = baz(v, 1);
        d[2] = baz(v, 2);
        d[3] = baz(v, 3);
    }
    dst
}

I used chunks_exact and chunks_exact_mut rather than chunks because it guarantees that the slice has the requested length, making them available separately if you need them. This seems to match your original code, which rounds off the length to an exact number of steps.

5
  • Thank you. I had chunks_exact and zip but couldn't achieve what I wanted with chunks_exact_mut. I've accepted your answer because it does do exactly what I asked for... but I see that I simplified my example too far. I do want to deal with remainders. ChunksExactMut does have an into_remainder method but I don't know how to use it: the iterator is moved when it is passed into zip and it doesn't have a clone method. How can I call into_remainder and use the iterator in the for loop?
    – c--
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 11:16
  • On second thoughts, I suppose I want something like last() or rev().next() rather than into_remainder() for the destination vector - but the problem remains. Given that ChunksExactMut does not have a clone method, how do I call a method on it after using it in the for loop? Or do I have to create a new iterator?
    – c--
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 11:33
  • You can use chunks instead of chunks_exact, but you will need to check the length of the slice in each case, to avoid going out of bounds. In my experience, using into_remainder is usually tricky!
    – Peter Hall
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 11:56
  • @c-- You can lend the iterator to the .zip - and then access it afterwards. Like let myiter = ... ; for ... in ... .zip(&mut myiter) { ... } /* Now do something with myiter */
    – bluss
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 23:00
  • @bluss thank you very much! That's what I was missing.
    – c--
    Commented Sep 5, 2019 at 9:35
1

I would go with that:

fn foo(src: &[u8]) -> Vec<u8> {
    src.chunks_exact(3)
        .map(|s| bar(s[0], s[1], s[2]))
        .flat_map(|v| (0..4).map(move |i| baz(v, i)))
        .collect()
}

Or if you prefer:

fn foo(src: &[u8]) -> Vec<u8> {
    src.chunks_exact(3)
        .map(|s| bar(s[0], s[1], s[2]))
        .flat_map(|v| vec![baz(v, 0), baz(v, 1), baz(v, 2), baz(v, 3)])
        .collect()
}

Not sure if you find one of them better.

3
  • 1
    Note that looking at the assembly, the first version seems to be better optimized, but someone good at interpreting the assembly could confirm, or not.
    – Boiethios
    Commented Sep 4, 2019 at 12:51
  • Thank you - this is great! Thanks also for the links to the Compiler Explorer. I didn't know that it supports Rust. Looking at the assembly, I can see that these versions are much less performant than the for loop ones: there's a lot of unnecessary memory allocation going on. It's a pity that the higher-level, functional-style code results in worse object code.
    – c--
    Commented Sep 27, 2019 at 13:34
  • @c-- Unfortunately, the "zero cost abstraction" claim isn't always true. There is a lot of work remaining to optimize the iterators, but I don't know if the team is on this issue currently.
    – Boiethios
    Commented Sep 27, 2019 at 13:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.