0

I have seen this Kotlin code:

sealed class BookingState {
    object ReasonOfTravel : BookingState()
}

In the Kotlin documentation, I see examples of declaring objects:

https://kotlinlang.org/docs/reference/object-declarations.html

but I couldn't see any that show the declaration without curly braces. In the code sample above, ReasonOfTravel inherits from BookingState but no curly braces appear after it. Are the curly braces only needed if you want to run some code when the object is initialized by BookingState()?

2

In your case, object is using as just a marker without any specific behavior. Later you can check instance of BookingState and do something:

sealed class BookingState {
    object ReasonOfTravel : BookingState()
    object ReasonOfTravel2 : BookingState()
    object ReasonOfTravel3 : BookingState()
}

fun test(bookingState: BookingState) = when(bookingState) {
    BookingState.ReasonOfTravel -> println("1")
    BookingState.ReasonOfTravel2 -> println("2")
    BookingState.ReasonOfTravel3 -> println("3")
}

you can add a specific behavior with curly braces in any time:

sealed class BookingState {
    object ReasonOfTravel : BookingState() {
        fun printMe() = println("test")
    }

    object ReasonOfTravel2 : BookingState()
    object ReasonOfTravel3 : BookingState()
}

fun test(bookingState: BookingState) = when (bookingState) {
    is BookingState.ReasonOfTravel -> bookingState.printMe()
    BookingState.ReasonOfTravel2 -> println("2")
    BookingState.ReasonOfTravel3 -> println("3")
}

code in curly braces won't run on object initialization. You have to use init block for it

2

Are the curly braces only needed if you want to run some code when the object is initialized by BookingState()?

This is correct. You can also do the exact same thing with classes and data classes

This is a valid class in Kotlin and complies successfully

class Example

With data classes most of the time we don't have code that executes underneath it, so we also don't use the curly braces

data class Example(val foo: String)

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