13

Look at this simple function

def prime_factors(n):
    for i in range(2,n):
      if n % i == 0:
        return i, prime_factors(n / i)
    return n

Here's the result of prime_factors(120)

(2, (2, (2, (3, 5))))

Instead of nested tuples, I want it to return one flat tuple or list.

(2, 2, 2, 3, 5)

Is there a simple way to do that?

0

5 Answers 5

22
def prime_factors(n):
  for i in range(2,n):
    if n % i == 0:
      return [i] + prime_factors(n / i)
  return [n]
5
  • 2
    Instead of creating a new list for each return value, you could pass the list as an argument and append to it. If the list gets large, this may save some space and time.
    – user25148
    Feb 23, 2009 at 15:37
  • 3
    Considering the original algorithm, I don't think performance is crucial here :-) Feb 23, 2009 at 16:58
  • Actually why would it save time and space?
    – Buzzzz
    Feb 5, 2012 at 18:17
  • @Buzzzz -- appending to a list is cheaper than merging lists into a copy. For long lists, copying is expensive. Feb 5, 2012 at 18:47
  • @FerdinandBeyer ah, didnt think of that like appending to a string triggers realloc of the whole string ( in like c#/java) :)
    – Buzzzz
    Feb 5, 2012 at 21:00
10
def prime_factors(n):
    for i in range(2,n):
        if n % i == 0:
           yield i
           for p in prime_factors(n / i):
               yield p
           return
    yield n

Example:

>>> tuple(prime_factors(100))
(2, 2, 5, 5)
7

Without changing the original function, from Python Tricks:

def flatten(x):
    """flatten(sequence) -> list

    Returns a single, flat list which contains all elements retrieved
    from the sequence and all recursively contained sub-sequences
    (iterables).

    Examples:
    >>> [1, 2, [3,4], (5,6)]
    [1, 2, [3, 4], (5, 6)]
    >>> flatten([[[1,2,3], (42,None)], [4,5], [6], 7, MyVector(8,9,10)])
    [1, 2, 3, 42, None, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]"""

    result = []
    for el in x:
        #if isinstance(el, (list, tuple)):
        if hasattr(el, "__iter__") and not isinstance(el, basestring):
            result.extend(flatten(el))
        else:
            result.append(el)
    return result
6

liw.fi suggested in a comment:

Instead of creating a new list for each return value, you could pass the list as an argument and append to it. If the list gets large, this may save some space and time.

Here's an implementation of liw.fi's suggestion.

def prime_factors(n, factors=None):
    if factors is None:
        factors = []
    for i in range(2,n):
        if n % i == 0:
            factors.append(i)
            return prime_factors(n / i, factors)
    factors.append(n)
    return factors
2
  • 1
    One gotcha, though. Because bar=[] is only initialized once, you will always append items to the same list object when calling your function with only one argument (at least in Python 2.x). Use bar=None (...) if bar is None: bar = []; instead. Feb 23, 2009 at 17:01
  • Thanks for "factors=None". In my local problem I did "resp=[]" and I have several problems because the data is growing for each call, the parameter was not clean after called.
    – erfelipe
    Jul 10, 2020 at 21:11
1

I don't know how relevant this is, but this function can help you flatten out deep nested lists (uses recursion), and can just as well be applied to the problem at hand. Though, it is using a hose to water a daisy

def flatten(S):
    if S == []:
        return S
    if isinstance(S[0], list):
        return flatten(S[0]) + flatten(S[1:])
    return S[:1] + flatten(S[1:])

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