12

I recently came across a piece of python code that looked like this

groups = {}
    for d, *v in dishes:
        for x in v:
            groups.setdefault(x, []).append(d)

dishes represents a 2d array. What does the 1st for loop statement mean? What is *v? What does the asterisk before v indicate? What other situations is an asterisk before a variable used?

2 Answers 2

26

It's essentially a combination of tuple/list unpacking and *args iterable unpacking. Each iterable is getting unpacked on each iteration of the for loop.

First let's look at a simple tuple/list unpacking:

>>> x, y = (1, 2)
>>> x
1
>>> y
2

# And now in the context of a loop:
>>> for x, y in [(1, 2), (3, 4)]:
>>>     print(f'x={x}, y={y}')
"x=1, y=2"
"x=3, y=4"

Now consider the following (and imagine the same concept within the loop as shown above):

>>> x, y = (1, 2, 3)
ValueError: too many values to unpack (expected 2)

>>> x, *y = 1, 2, 3
>>> x
1 
>>> y 
[2, 3]

Note how * allows y to consume all remaining arguments.

This is similar to how you would use * in a function - it allows an unspecified number of arguments and it consumes them all. You can see more examples of (*args) usage here.

>>> def foo(x, *args):
>>>     print(x)
>>>     print(args)

>>>foo(1, 2, 3, 4)
1
[2, 3, 4]

As for practical examples, here is a quick one:

>>> names = ("Jack", "Johnson", "Senior")
>>> fist_name, *surnames =  names
>>> print(surnames)
["Johnson", "Senior"]
2
  • 1
    Excellent answer! And I wonder why the last example is considered to be bad?
    – ToughMind
    Sep 6, 2019 at 1:53
  • I originally had something else. Will edit, thanks!
    – gtalarico
    Sep 6, 2019 at 5:28
1

Basically * indicates n number of countless elements.

Example :

x=1,2,4,6,9,8
print(type(x))
print(x)

Output:

<class 'tuple'>
(1, 2, 4, 6, 9, 8)
y,*x=1,2,4,6,9,8
print(type(x))
print(x)

Output:

<class 'list'>
[2, 4, 6, 9, 8]

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.