-1

I have a repository function as below:

public async Task<TableName> SomeFunction(int id)
{
  return await _context.TableName.FirstOrDefaultAsync(u => u.Id == id);
}

In my Controller, I am calling the above function as follows:

var data = await _repo.SomeFunction(id);
.....
.....
.....
.....
data = await _repo.SomeFunction(id);

The second time when I call the function back it does not give me updated data.

Note: There is a backend process which updates this data meanwhile and there is some criteria through which I land to the 2nd repeatation of the same function call.

  • 1
    Are both the calls under same context? If so, EF do not send request back to database. It just returns the entity already received in first call --- from cache. – Amit Joshi Sep 6 '19 at 12:43
  • @AmitJoshi it is under same context – Tejashri Patange Sep 6 '19 at 12:44
  • Then it is obvious you will not get the updates the way you are fetching those. You said, other process is updating the data in background which must be running under different context. You have to look for different API which forces the database call. – Amit Joshi Sep 6 '19 at 12:46
  • @AmitJoshi the backend process is some scheduler updating the data.. i just want to know the way i can get updated data – Tejashri Patange Sep 6 '19 at 12:48
2

Try this way:

public async Task<TableName> SomeFunction(int id)
{
  return await _context.TableName.AsNoTracking().FirstOrDefaultAsync(u => u.Id == id);
}

The only downside is that the entity will not be added to the context.

| improve this answer | |
2

The context is created with a scoped lifetime, which for a web app would be the life of a request. During this time, any injection of your context will use the same instance. Internally, a DbContext has an object cache, which it fills with the results of your queries, so when you first request this entity, it's cached, and all future requests for the same entity, while that context instance lives, returns from the object cache instead of making the query to the database again. This is by design, and is desirable functionality. It greatly reduces the load on your database, and benefits the performance of both EF and your app.

If you really want to ensure that the data is always up to date, then you can do:

var refreshedEntity = _context.Entry(entity).GetDatabaseValues();

You can also just pull the entity out originally using AsNoTracking():

return await _context.TableName.AsNoTracking().FirstOrDefaultAsync(u => u.Id == id);

However, if you do that, you'll need to ensure it's attached to the context if you want to modify it and save it back. Returning a detached entity from a method like this is not going to be obvious to the consumer that it is detached, and could lead to exceptions.

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