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The title may be too general. I am benchmarking the following 2 statements on a large vector<unsigned> v:

sort(v.begin(), v.end(), l);

sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [](unsigned a, unsigned b) { return l(a, b); });

where l is defined as

bool l(unsigned a, unsigned b) { return a < b; }

The result surprises me: the second is as fast as sort(v.begin(), v.end()); or sort(v.begin(), v.end(), std::less<>()); while the first is significantly slower.

My question is why wrapping the function in a lambda speeds up the program.

Moreover, sort(v.begin(), v.end(), [](unsigned a, unsigned b) { return l(b, a); }); is as fast, too.

Related code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <chrono>
#include <random>
#include <functional>
#include <algorithm>

using std::cout;
using std::endl;
using std::vector;

bool l(unsigned a, unsigned b) { return a < b; };

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    auto random = std::default_random_engine();
    vector<unsigned> d;
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        d.push_back(random());
    auto t0 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::sort(d.begin(), d.end());
    auto t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    cout << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(t1 - t0).count() << endl;


    d.clear();
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        d.push_back(random());
    t0 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::sort(d.begin(), d.end(), l);
    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    cout << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(t1 - t0).count() << endl;

    d.clear();
    for (unsigned i = 0; i < 100000000; ++i)
        d.push_back(random());
    t0 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    std::sort(d.begin(), d.end(), [](unsigned a, unsigned b) {return l(a, b); });
    t1 = std::chrono::high_resolution_clock::now();
    cout << std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::nanoseconds>(t1 - t0).count() << endl;
    return 0;
}

Tested on both g++ and MSVC.

Update:

I found that the lambda version generate exactly same assembly code as default one (sort(v.begin(), v.end())), while the one using a function is different. But I do not know assembly and thus can't do more.

0
4

sort is potentially a big function, so it's usually not inlined. Therefore, it is compiled alone. Consider sort:

template <typename RanIt, typename Pred>
void sort(RanIt, RanIt, Pred)
{
}

If Pred is bool (*)(unsigned, unsigned), there is no way to inline the function — a function pointer type cannot uniquely identify a function. There is only one sort<It, It, bool (*)(unsigned, unsigned)>, and it is invoked by all calls with different function pointers. The user passes l to the function, but that's just processed as an ordinary argument. It is therefore impossible to inline the call.

If Pred is a lambda, it is trivial to inline the function call — the lambda type uniquely identifies a function. Every call to this instantiation of sort invoke the same (lambda) function, so we don't have the problem for function pointers. The lambda itself contains a direct call to l, which is also easy to inline. Therefore, the compiler inlines all function calls and generate the same code as a no-predicate sort.


The case with a function closure type (std::less<>) is similar: the behavior of calling a std::less<> is fully known when compiling sort, so inlining is trivial.

8
  • Sorry I don't quite understand. What do you mean by "If Pred is a lambda, it is trivial to inline the function call"? Does that mean the comparison is compiled within the function sort?
    – user
    Sep 7 '19 at 7:28
  • @user The reason is given after the dash symbol "—": the lambda type uniquely identifies a function.
    – L. F.
    Sep 7 '19 at 7:29
  • @ L. F. Does that mean the comparison is compiled within the function sort?
    – user
    Sep 7 '19 at 7:30
  • @user When the template is instantiated, the compiler obviously is aware of the types used to instantiate it (the lambda type), so yeah, you are right
    – L. F.
    Sep 7 '19 at 7:31
  • But according to the assembly, it's not the case. Thay are:std::_Sort_unchecked<unsigned int *,std::less<void> > (07FF7873F1D50h) for the no-pred one, std::_Sort_unchecked<unsigned int *,bool (__cdecl*)(unsigned int,unsigned int)> (07FF7873F17D0h) for the function, and std::_Sort_unchecked<unsigned int *,<lambda_53300caec326e2a90729d913f36311e2> > (07FF7873F1A80h) for the lambda
    – user
    Sep 7 '19 at 7:33

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