6

I am trying to limit the bandwidth (download / upload speed) that a HTTP request uses. I'm using the NPM package stream-throttle. I created a custom HTTP agent to pipe the socket through an instance of Throttle and have timed the speed at which a 5MB file downloads.

const http = require("http");
const net = require("net");
const {Throttle, ThrottleGroup} = require("stream-throttle");

const maxBandwidth = 100;
// an example 5MB file of random data
const str = "http://212.183.159.230/5MB.zip";


// this pipes an instance of Throttle
class SlowAgent extends http.Agent {
    createConnection(options, callback){
        const socket = new net.Socket(options);
        socket.pipe(new Throttle({rate: maxBandwidth}));
        socket.connect(options);
        return socket;
    }
}

const options = {
    // this should slow down the request
    agent: new SlowAgent()
};

const time = Date.now();
const req = http.request(str, options, (res) => {
    res.on("data", () => {
    });
    res.on('end', () => {
        console.log("Done! Elapsed time: " + (Date.now() - time) + "ms");
    });
});

req.on('error', (e) => {
    console.error(`problem with request: ${e.message}`);
});

req.on("end", () => {
    console.log("done");
});

console.log("Request started");
req.end();

Regardless of the value of maxBandwidth or whether SlowAgent is used at all (I have tried commenting out agent: new SlowAgent()), I notice no difference in the elapsed time (about 4000 milliseconds). How can I fix my SlowAgent class? Do I not understand socket.pipe? Or is there something else I need to do?

freakish pointed out to change SlowAgent to be this:

// this pipes an instance of Throttle
class SlowAgent extends http.Agent {
    createConnection(options, callback){
        const socket = new net.Socket(options);
        socket.connect(options);
        return socket.pipe(new Throttle({rate: 10}));
    }
}

but that causes this problem:

problem with request: Parse Error: Expected HTTP/ Error: Parse Error: Expected HTTP/
    at Throttle.socketOnData (_http_client.js:456:22)
    at Throttle.emit (events.js:209:13)
    at addChunk (_stream_readable.js:305:12)
    at readableAddChunk (_stream_readable.js:286:11)
    at Throttle.Readable.push (_stream_readable.js:220:10)
    at Throttle.Transform.push (_stream_transform.js:150:32)
    at /home/max/Documents/Personal/node-projects/proxy/node_modules/stream-throttle/src/throttle.js:37:14
    at processTicksAndRejections (internal/process/task_queues.js:75:11) {
  bytesParsed: 0,
  code: 'HPE_INVALID_CONSTANT',
  reason: 'Expected HTTP/',
  rawPacket: <Buffer 47>
}
  • You should return socket.pipe(new Throttle({rate: maxBandwidth})); in your createConnection, no? At the moment you pipe but you don't use the other (throttled) end. Please check it out and let me know if it works (can't test it now). – freakish Sep 9 at 22:05
  • @freakish I get an error when I try this (see my edit). – programmer5000 Sep 9 at 22:54
0

I manage to get it worked by doing away with a custom agent and use createConnection inside http.request options:

const options = {
    createConnection(options) {
        const socket = new net.Socket();
        return socket.connect({host: options.host, port: options.port});
    },
    hostname: "212.183.159.230",
    path: "/5MB.zip"
};

const time = Date.now();

const req = http.request(options, (res) => {

    res.pipe(new Throttle({rate: 200 * 1024}))
        .on("data", (chunk) => {
            console.log(chunk.length);
        })

    res.on("end", () => {
        console.log("Done! Elapsed time: " + (Date.now() - time) + "ms");
    });
});

  • 1
    This doesn't actually limit the socket reading process. I tested with a local express server, the callback of res.sendFile has been called immediately. – Avraham Sep 10 at 15:52
  • Of course, this code is on the client side. I don't think it's possible to limit the speed for the server from the client. If you want to limit the server response time, you would need to work on the server not the client. – kkkkkkk Sep 10 at 16:23
  • @kkkkkkk It is possible to limit the received bandwidth on the client side (it can be done with eg. iptables) – programmer5000 Sep 12 at 2:49
  • Right, that's possible when you get to a lower layer, but not at the application layer, .ie Node application, I believe – kkkkkkk Sep 12 at 2:57
0

Streaming bandwidth control must be implemented in both end, server and client.

From client perspective,

Upload rate can be managed by throttling

client application or client network layer or server network layer

Download rate can be managed by throttling

server application or server network layer client network layer

Please have a look this test code. You may change rate variable in both side.

Environment

node v10.16.3 in windows 10.

server.js

var fs = require('fs');  // file system
var http = require('http');
const {ThrottleGroup} = require("stream-throttle");

/**
 * Change to various rate to test
 */
var tg = new ThrottleGroup({rate: 1024*1024}); //1 MiB per sec

/**
 * please copy your own file
 * my file is 4.73 MB (4,961,271 bytes) ,it takes 4~5 sec to send data chunk
 */
var source = "source.jpg"; //

var server = http.createServer((req, res) => {

    var rstream = fs.createReadStream(source);
    rstream
        .pipe(tg.throttle()) //throttle here
        .pipe(res);

    //define event 
    rstream
        .on('open', ()=>{
            console.log('open', new Date())
        })        
        .on('data', (chunk)=>{
            console.log(new Date(), chunk.length) // 65536 bytes
        })
        .on('close', () => {
            console.log('close', new Date())
        });       
});
server.listen(80, '127.0.0.1');  // start
//OUTPUT when client request, max chunk 65536 bytes
>node server.js

open 2019-09-13T05:27:40.724Z
2019-09-13T05:27:40.730Z 65536
2019-09-13T05:27:40.732Z 65536
...
2019-09-13T05:27:44.355Z 65536
2019-09-13T05:27:44.419Z 46071
close 2019-09-13T05:27:44.421Z

client.js

const fs = require('fs');
const http = require("http");
const {ThrottleGroup} = require("stream-throttle");

var tg = new ThrottleGroup({rate: 1024*1024*2}); //2 MiB /sec

/**
 receiving 4.73 MB (4,961,271 bytes) ,
 it takes 2~3 sec to receive 4.73MB, but server side throttle is 1Mib
 Thus, it still takes 4~5 sec to download as server has been throttled
 */
var wstream = fs.createWriteStream("ouput.jpg");
wstream
    .on('open', () => {
        console.log('open', new Date())        
    })
    .on('finish', () => {
        console.log('finish', new Date())        
    });  

var dataLength = 0;
http.get('http://127.0.0.1/', (res) => {    
    res
    .pipe(tg.throttle())
    .pipe(wstream);

    res
    .on('open', ()=>{
        console.log('res open', new Date())
    })        
    .on('data', (chunk)=>{
        dataLength += chunk.length
        console.log(new Date(), `data length: ${dataLength}`)
    })
    .on('close', () => {
        console.log('res close', new Date())        
    })          

  });
//OUTPUT
>node client.js

open 2019-09-13T05:27:40.718Z
2019-09-13T05:27:40.736Z 'data length: 65426'
2019-09-13T05:27:40.741Z 'data length: 65536' 
2019-09-13T05:27:40.742Z 'data length: 130953'
...
2019-09-13T05:27:44.463Z 'data length: 4961271'
finish 2019-09-13T05:27:44.474Z
res close 2019-09-13T05:27:44.476Z

For real world example, change client.js throttle rate and next line

http.get('http://127.0.0.1/', (res) => {

to something like

http.get('http://i.ytimg.com/vi/ZYifkcmIb-4/maxresdefault.jpg', (res) => {    

In real world, networking is more complicated as more actors are involved.

SERVER side OSI MODEL <==> NETWORK <==> CLIENT side OSI MODEL

Because internet provider or carrier will throttle their port, it will affect your upload and download rate.

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