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I'm trying to pass a borrowed struct into a borrowed enum.

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct CustomerData {
    // Many fields about customers
}

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct EmployeeData {
    // Many fields about employees
}

pub enum Person {
    Customer(CustomerData),
    Employee(EmployeeData)
}

fn do_something_with_customer(customer: &CustomerData) {
    let person = &Person::Customer(customer);

    // This would work, but this can be a large struct.
    // let person = &Person::Customer(customer.clone());

    general_method(person);
}

fn do_something_with_employee(employee: &EmployeeData) {
    let person = &Person::Employee(employee);

    // This would work, but this can be a large struct.
    // let person = &Person::Employee(employee.clone());

    general_method(person);
}

fn general_method(person: &Person) {

}

fn main() {
    let person = Person::Customer(CustomerData { });

    match &person {
        Person::Customer(data) => {
            do_something_with_customer(data);
        }
        Person::Employee(data) => {
            do_something_with_employee(data);
        }
    }
}

Compiling gives me the result:

error[E0308]: mismatched types
  --> src/main.rs:19:36
   |
19 |     let person = &Person::Customer(customer);
   |                                    ^^^^^^^^
   |                                    |
   |                                    expected struct `CustomerData`, found reference
   |                                    help: consider dereferencing the borrow: `*customer`
   |
   = note: expected type `CustomerData`
              found type `&CustomerData`

error[E0308]: mismatched types
  --> src/main.rs:28:36
   |
28 |     let person = &Person::Employee(employee);
   |                                    ^^^^^^^^
   |                                    |
   |                                    expected struct `EmployeeData`, found reference
   |                                    help: consider dereferencing the borrow: `*employee`
   |
   = note: expected type `EmployeeData`
              found type `&EmployeeData`

I get that the Rust compiler isn't allowing me to do this, but I feel like I should be able to, considering the enum I'm passing my structs to is borrowed as well.

Is there a pattern/workaround for this scenario? Maybe using the Rc type? I'd hate to litter my code with it for this scenario.

use std::rc::Rc;

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct CustomerData {
    // Many fields about customers
}

#[derive(Copy, Clone)]
pub struct EmployeeData {
    // Many fields about employees
}

pub enum Person {
    Customer(Rc<CustomerData>),
    Employee(Rc<EmployeeData>)
}

fn do_something_with_customer(customer: Rc<CustomerData>) {
    let person = &Person::Customer(customer);

    // This would work, but this can be a large struct.
    // let person = &Person::Customer(customer.clone());

    general_method(person);
}

fn do_something_with_employee(employee: Rc<EmployeeData>) {
    let person = &Person::Employee(employee);

    // This would work, but this can be a large struct.
    // let person = &Person::Employee(employee.clone());

    general_method(person);
}

fn general_method(person: &Person) {

}

fn main() {
    let person = Person::Customer(Rc::new(CustomerData { }));

    match &person {
        Person::Customer(data) => {
            do_something_with_customer(data.clone());
        }
        Person::Employee(data) => {
            do_something_with_employee(data.clone());
        }
    }
}
2

You have misidentified the problem and the compiler was spot-on on its error comments.

You defined your enum like so:

pub enum Person {
    Customer(CustomerData),
    Employee(EmployeeData)
}

But then you decide that your enum member should be Person::Customer(&CustomerData):

fn do_something_with_customer(customer: &CustomerData) {
    let person = &Person::Customer(customer);

References are not transitive. Because &CustomerData is a reference does not mean that the entire enum will be a reference to real data (i.e. &Person::Customer(CustomerData)).

There are two ways to fix it; the obvious is to see if CustomerData implements Copy. If it does, you can just dereference (and therefore implicitly copy):

fn do_something_with_customer(customer: &CustomerData) {
    let person = Person::Customer(*customer);

(This is what the compiler suggested, so I'm pretty sure your type implements Copy)

The other option is to #[derive(Clone)] on the type and call customer.clone(). Again, at the cost of an extra allocation.

If you really want the reference in the enum, you need to change the enum definition to:

pub enum Person<'a> {
    Customer(&'a CustomerData),
    Employee(&'a EmployeeData)
}

And handle the fact that the object property is now a reference, with all the problems associated.

  • 2
    This one isn't about the safety of this, but the safety of what can come afterwards. If you duplicate the struct (via Rc or Copy or Clone) you effectively have two independent entities in memory (Rc is a special case), all of them immutable. What if you then want to mutate this data? – Sébastien Renauld Sep 8 '19 at 11:15
  • 1
    In the case of Copy or Clone, you can, but you won't touch the other structs. In the case of Rc you cannot, period, and you then need to wrap this Rc around RefCell to have interior mutability – Sébastien Renauld Sep 8 '19 at 11:16
  • 1
    The crux of this is down to what you actually want to achieve overall. Do you just want an immutable copy of the data, even when the enum is owned? Rc. Do you want to pass a reference around and can guarantee your object lifetime restrictions fit? &. Is your case the flyweight pattern? Copy/Clone is fine. – Sébastien Renauld Sep 8 '19 at 11:17
  • 1
    Also, there is no real reason to be afraid of references. If you write your code in a sane fashion you only really see the definitions of them on the definition of structs, traits and enums; in actual business logic, most of them get elided and/or simplified by the compiler. The real crux of this is really that there are three solutions to solve your problem, and they all depend with what you do with your data after the snippet you showed us :-) – Sébastien Renauld Sep 8 '19 at 11:22
  • 2
    That rules out references in 99% of cases. Since you mentioned yourself that Clone/Copy isn't an option due to size, this means you answered your own question with Rc :-) Do note as well that Rc::new() calls aren't actually necessary. Rc<T> implements From<T>, which means that wherever you need a Rc<T> you can simply call into() – Sébastien Renauld Sep 8 '19 at 11:27

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