4

There are situations where my form inputs would have icons, and some without. Originally, I thought I would be able to put the class within the form builder like so:

$builder
        ->add('email', EmailType::class, [
            'label' => 'Email address',
            'attr' => [
                'placeholder' => 'john.smith@foo.com',
                'class' => 'has_icon icon_email'
            ],
            'constraints' => [
                new NotBlank([
                    'message' => 'Enter an email address.'
                ])
            ]
        ])

And then the output within the form template could potentially take the class and reconfigure the appearance. Clearly this isn't working, but this was the direction I was going in:

{% block form_row %}
    <div class="form_row">
        {{ form_label(form) }}
        {% if form.vars.attr.class == 'has_icon' %}
            test
        {% endif %}
        {{ form_errors(form) }}
    </div>
{% endblock form_row %}

Is this the right approach or is there another more dependable way of going about this?


Edit 9/22/2019

I wanted to do a test and it was interesting because if I were to try to access the form's block prefixes, I can by specifying in the form theme like so:

block_prefixes.2 == "password" and this will access that array within block prefixes and check for that. However, if I were to access attr then the class option like so:

attr.class it will return an error Key "class" does not exist as the array is empty. Why is that? How can I readily access the array within attr?

  • javascript and/or css – Arleigh Hix Sep 9 '19 at 17:03
  • Uh, but for a form field you can't just "apply an icon to a input" - inputs don't allow for :before/:after pseudos. And if I were to do this from the JS side, that would create a significant hit for each input. I feel like this doesn't seem like the right solution? Is that the only solution? – Majo0od Sep 12 '19 at 15:38
  • What type of icons are you using? – Arleigh Hix Sep 12 '19 at 19:15
3
+25

I think you want to make a custom FormType for each input then use a custom fom_widget for each in your theme much like is done in the built-in Symfony\Component\Form\Extension\Core\Type\PercentType and bootstrap_4_layout.html.twig

FormType:

// src:"/vendor/symfony/form/Extension/Core/Type/PercentType.php"

namespace Symfony\Component\Form\Extension\Core\Type;

use Symfony\Component\Form\AbstractType;
use Symfony\Component\Form\Extension\Core\DataTransformer\PercentToLocalizedStringTransformer;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormBuilderInterface;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormInterface;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormView;
use Symfony\Component\OptionsResolver\OptionsResolver;

class PercentType extends AbstractType
{
    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function buildForm(FormBuilderInterface $builder, array $options)
    {
        $builder->addViewTransformer(new PercentToLocalizedStringTransformer($options['scale'], $options['type']));
    }

    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function buildView(FormView $view, FormInterface $form, array $options)
    {
        $view->vars['symbol'] = $options['symbol'];
    }

    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function configureOptions(OptionsResolver $resolver)
    {
        $resolver->setDefaults([
            'scale' => 0,
            'symbol' => '%',
            'type' => 'fractional',
            'compound' => false,
        ]);

        $resolver->setAllowedValues('type', [
            'fractional',
            'integer',
        ]);

        $resolver->setAllowedTypes('scale', 'int');
        $resolver->setAllowedTypes('symbol', ['bool', 'string']);
    }

    /**
     * {@inheritdoc}
     */
    public function getBlockPrefix()
    {
        return 'percent';
    }
}

form_theme:

// src:"/vendor/symfony/twig-bridge/Resources/views/Form/bootstrap_4_layout.html.twig"
...

{% block percent_widget -%}
    {%- if symbol -%}
        <div class="input-group">
            {{- block('form_widget_simple') -}}
            <div class="input-group-append">
                <span class="input-group-text">{{ symbol|default('%') }}</span>
            </div>
        </div>
    {%- else -%}
        {{- block('form_widget_simple') -}}
    {%- endif -%}
{%- endblock percent_widget %}

...
|improve this answer|||||
  • Hmmmm... Not sure if this is the right way to go about it? Because what if I wanted a password field to have an icon, or a number, text, etc. Doesn't that cause additional work? – Majo0od Sep 14 '19 at 19:46
  • Well, its the way Symfony does it. What I showed you is straight from Symfony source files. – Arleigh Hix Sep 14 '19 at 22:37
2

Your current approach could work. You just need to get the variable of the correct child of your form and not the entire form. This should work (in this case on email):

{% if form.email.vars.attr.class == 'has_icon icon_email' %}
    do or show something here
{% endif %}

or to simply test for your single class has_icon:

{% if 'has_icon' in form.email.vars.attr.class %}
    do or show something here
{% endif %} 

For any field field as you described in your comment, I guess you need to iterate over all form children and see if they contain the class you are testing for. Something like this:

{% for input in form.children  %}
    {% if 'has_icon' in input.vars.attr.class | default %}
        do or show something here
    {% endif %}
{% endfor %}

the | default is there for fields without the class attribute. Also, I immage you want to render the input field in the same iteration, so you can actually render your icon in the right place. This should get you started I hope.

|improve this answer|||||
  • Does this mean I have to check literally every form variable instance? Is there no way to just check if any input has the "has_icon" class so that I don't have to manually update this every time I create a new instance of has_icon? – Majo0od Sep 18 '19 at 11:04
  • Just look at the last bit of code I put my my answer. This will make it possible to just check for "has_icon" anywhere in the class. – Dirk J. Faber Sep 18 '19 at 15:56
  • Yeah but that is specifically for "email" in form, not blank slated for any input element. – Majo0od Sep 19 '19 at 11:18
  • Which means, if I have more than one input that requires an icon, I have to manually keep updating each individual one, which seems ridiculous to me. – Majo0od Sep 20 '19 at 15:25
  • I thought you would render all fields individually, given the form_row in your code, bu so you're saying that you just want to render the whole form? Sorry, its not entirely clear to me what you try to achieve. – Dirk J. Faber Sep 20 '19 at 15:40
0

I figured it out. Since icons were going to be used in my application from global perspective.

The approach is to firstly extend the FormType which in my case was called FormTypeExtension which was placed in this hierarchy: src/Form/Extensions/FormTypeExtension.php

That file outlined:

<?php

namespace App\Form\Extension;

use Symfony\Component\Form\AbstractTypeExtension;
use Symfony\Component\Form\Extension\Core\Type\FormType;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormInterface;
use Symfony\Component\Form\FormView;
use Symfony\Component\OptionsResolver\OptionsResolver;
use Symfony\Component\PropertyAccess\PropertyAccess;

class FormTypeExtension extends AbstractTypeExtension
{
    public static function getExtendedTypes() : iterable
    {
        return [FormType::class];
    }

    public function configureOptions(OptionsResolver $resolver)
    {
        $resolver->setDefaults([
            'icon' => null
        ]);
    }

    public function buildView(FormView $view, FormInterface $form, array $options)
    {

        $view->vars['icon'] = $options['icon'];
    }
}

?>

Now within the builder I am able to apply the icon option (which defaults to null thanks to my extension, so in cases form builder doesn't use it):

$builder
    ->add('email', EmailType::class, [
        'label' => 'Email address',
        'attr' => [
            'placeholder' => 'john.smith@foo.com'
        ],
        'constraints' => [
            new NotBlank([
               'message' => 'Enter an email address.'
            ])
        ],
        "icon" => "icon_email"
   ])

And now I am able to access that information within my form theme like {% if icon != null %} Now I can customize it to how I see fit.

And to also state I love Symfony 4 even more because of how powerful it is! Cheers, hope this helps someone else out there.

|improve this answer|||||

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.