1

I want to add quotes for each field if the field values is not enclosed with quotes.

Scenario 1 : Below is my input

eno;ename;address;gender
1;AaA;"mnop qrstzyx";M
2;bB;"abc";F
3;cC;"adef;mnp";ars
4;mnp;ade;M

Expected output

"eno";"ename";"address";"gender"
"1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M"
"2";"bB";"abc";"F"
"3";"cC";"adef;mnp";"ars"
"4";"mnp";"ade";"M"

Options which i tried

sed 's/[^;]*/"&"/g'

Scenario 2 : Below is my input

eno;ename;address;gender
1;AaA;"mnop 
qrst
zyx";M
2;bB;"abc";F
3;cC;"adef;
mnp";ars
4;mnp;ade;M

Expected output

"eno";"ename";"address";"gender"
"1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M"
"2";"bB";"abc";"F"
"3";"cC";"adef;mnp";"ars"
"4";"mnp";"ade";"M"
  • 1
    Try perl -pe 's/(?<![^;])".*?"(?![^;])(*SKIP)(*FAIL)|([^;"\r\n]+)/"$1"/g' file – Wiktor Stribiżew Sep 9 at 11:53
  • Thanks Wiktor, It works fine. Can you explain bit more what does the above command does – user1485267 Sep 9 at 12:06
  • It matches all quoted fields and omits these matches, and then grabs all chunks of 1+ chars other than ", ; and CR/LFs, and wraps them with "s. – Wiktor Stribiżew Sep 9 at 12:13
  • Thank you wiktor, I added scenario 2 in the same question – user1485267 Sep 9 at 12:15
  • Any suggestions for scenario 2 – user1485267 Sep 9 at 13:18
3

Use FPAT with gnu awk to handle CSV files

awk -v FPAT='([^;]*)|("[^"]+")' -v OFS=";" '{for (i=1;i<=NF;i++) {if ($i!~/^\"/) $i="\""$i"\""}} 1' file
"eno";"ename";"address";"gender"
"1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M"
"2";"bB";"abc";"F"
"3";"cC";"adef;mnp";"ars"
"4";"mnp";"ade";"M"
  • for Scenario 1 Quotes are adding at beginning and ending not for each field – user1485267 Sep 9 at 12:29
  • @user1485267 from your request "1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M" do you like this insted? "1;AaA;"mnop qrstzyx";M" – Jotne Sep 9 at 12:32
  • Yes i need it like this "1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M" – user1485267 Sep 9 at 12:39
  • @user1485267 and my answer is not what you describe??? My answer "1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M", your request "1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M" – Jotne Sep 9 at 12:47
  • 1
    @EdMorton Do you mean change FPAT="([^;]+)|(\"[^\"]+\")" to FPAT="([^;]*)|(\"[^\"]*\")"? – Jotne Sep 9 at 16:51
2

Perl one liner using the useful Text::AutoCSV module:

perl -MText::AutoCSV -e 'Text::AutoCSV->new(in_file=>"input.txt",
    out_file=>"output.txt",
    sep_char=>";",
    out_always_quote=>1)->write()'

And to squash newlines in fields:

perl -MText::AutoCSV -e 'Text::AutoCSV->new(in_file=>"input.txt",
    out_file=>"output.txt",
    sep_char=>";",
    out_always_quote=>1,
    read_post_update_hr=>sub{
        while(my ($k,$v) = each %{$_[0]}){
            ${$_[0]}{$k}=$v=~s/\n//gr
        } })->write()'

will output

"eno";"ename";"address";"gender"
"1";"AaA";"mnop qrstzyx";"M"
"2";"bB";"abc";"F"
"3";"cC";"adef;mnp";"ars"
"4";"mnp";"ade";"M"

If you have non-trivial CSV-like data like yours, it's always better to use an actual CSV parser instead of trying to hack around with regular expressions trying to get something to work.

  • Is there any way outfile can be placed directly to hadoop file system instead of local file system without landing to intermediate area by using your command – user1485267 Sep 12 at 8:21
  • @user1485267 Not a clue; I am completely ignorant of hadoop. – Shawn Sep 12 at 8:36
  • Ok, No issues. Can we keep the output of data in memory and process output with redirection. for example perl 'command' > output.txt – user1485267 Sep 12 at 9:03
2

This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -E ':a;s/^([^"]*("[^";]*"[^"]*)*"[^";]*);/\1\n/;ta;s/"//g;s/[^;]*/"&"/g;y/\n/;/' file

Change the ;'s within double quoted strings to something else (\n). Remove double quotes from all fields. Surround all characters which are not delimiters (;) by double quotes. Finally replace newlines by ;'s.

The second example needs newlines removed from within double quoted strings. A separate solution for this is:

sed -Ez ':a;s/^([^"]*("[^"\n]*"[^"]*)*"[^"\n]*)\n/\1/;ta' file

Or, for older seds:

sed -r '1h;1!H;$!d;x;:a;s/^([^"]*("[^"\n]*"[^"]*)*"[^"\n]*)\n/\1/;ta' file

The overall solution is a combination of the above, where the file is first treated by the second solution which is piped into the first solution e.g.

sed -Ez ':a;s/^([^"]*("[^"\n]*"[^"]*)*"[^"\n]*)\n/\1/;ta' file |
sed -E ':a;s/^([^"]*("[^";]*"[^"]*)*"[^";]*);/\1\n/;ta;s/"//g;s/[^;]*/"&"/g;y/\n/;/'
  • it didnt work with the final solution.. it is adding quotes without appending to previous line.. if my filename is input.csv – user1485267 Sep 10 at 5:58
  • @user1485267 I do not understand your comment. For both scenario 1 and 2 I get the same result. – potong Sep 10 at 11:46
  • 1
    @user1485267 see here for working example. – potong Sep 10 at 15:50
  • 1
    @user1485267 you can use a tee command e.g. command1 inputFile | tee saveFile1 | command2 >saveFile2 – potong Sep 10 at 21:48
  • 1
    @user1485267 see edit for older seds: – potong Sep 11 at 15:30
0

I suggest a simple awk (standard Linux gawk) script that update each line and print it

awk '{
     gsub(/;/, "\";\""); # input line substitute all ; with ";"
     print "\"" $0 "\""; # print input line wrapped with "
}' input.txt

or one liner

awk '{gsub(/;/, "\";\"");print "\"" $0 "\"";}' input.txt
  • That would turn a;"b;c" into "a";""b";"c"" instead of the desired "a";"b;c". – Ed Morton Sep 9 at 14:20

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