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Object made using new operator does not seem to be available outside the scope! Isn't that the whole point of the new operator?

https://ideone.com/DDvo9y - Please check this link to see the result.

#include<iostream>

class myClass
{
private:
  int val;
public:
    myClass () = delete;
    myClass (int val):val{val}{}
    int get () const
    {
      return val;
    }
};

bool ifEqualMake (int a, int b, myClass * obj)
{
  if (a == b)      obj = new myClass (a);
  else{
      std::cout << "Difference exists: " << a - b << '\n';
      obj = new myClass (a + b);
    }
  std::cout << " Object made with value :" << obj->get () << '\n';
  return (a == b);
}

int main ()
{
  myClass *obj1 = nullptr;
  myClass *obj2 = nullptr;
  myClass *obj3 = nullptr;

  ifEqualMake (3, 3, obj1);
  ifEqualMake (4, 3, obj2);
  ifEqualMake (4, 4, obj3);

  if(obj1) std::cout << "obj 1 made in heap: " << obj1->get () << '\n';
  if(obj2) std::cout << "obj 2 made in heap: " << obj2->get()<<'\n';
  if(obj3) std::cout << "obj 3 made in heap: " << obj3->get () << '\n';

  delete obj1;
  delete obj2;
  delete obj3;

  return 0;

}

  • 1
    You're not passing the pointer by reference, you made a copy of the pointer, so the caller still references nullptr for each of the three variables. – Patrick Roberts Sep 10 '19 at 2:13
  • @PatrickRoberts Please do not answer in the comments section. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Sep 10 '19 at 2:18
  • It's called a summary. Answer posts are for detailed explanations. – Patrick Roberts Sep 10 '19 at 2:22
  • 2
    The comments section is not for answering. At all. Period. Hover over the "add a comment" link - it says that. You bypass the peer review system by misusing comments. Comments are for requesting clarification (and for having arguments). Thanks. – Lightness Races BY-SA 3.0 Sep 10 '19 at 2:23
1

It isn't.

You're confusing the dynamically-allocated object that you created with new, and the pointer that points to it.

The pointer's scope is limited just like any other automatic-storage-duration object.

It looks like you meant to use it as an "out" argument to the function ifEqualMake, perhaps by taking a reference to it rather than a copy. Then alterations to it, such as pointing it to a new object, will be mirrored in the calling scope.

1

The parameter obj is passed by value, that means it's just a copy of the argument, and any modification on itself inside the function (like obj = new myClass (a);) has nothing to do with the original pointer. In the meanwhile, the object constructed inside the function won't be destroyed.

You might change it to pass-by-reference.

bool
ifEqualMake (int a, int b, myClass *& obj)
//                                  ^
{
  ...
}
1

Consider the following function:

void foo(int i) {
    i = 4;
}

void bar() {
    int j = 0;
    foo(j);
    std::cout << j << '\n';
}

You would expect bar to print 0, not 4, because foo is assigning to a local variable.

This behaviour does not change with pointers. The following code behaves the same way:

void foo(int* i) {
    int temp = 0;
    i = &temp;
}

void bar() {
    int* j = nullptr;
    foo(j);
    std::cout << j << '\n';
}

The simplest fix to the code you present is to take the pointer by reference:

void foo(int*& i) {
    int temp = 0;
    i = &temp;
}

void bar() {
    int* j = nullptr;
    foo(j);
    // j now points to a destroyed object
    std::cout << j << '\n';
}

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