1

I'm facing a problem which has been discussed here multiple times, but unfortunately none of the answers or hints work for me.

I want to use different custom types (for example money or recordlink).

In the database I would store the different attributes of these custom types into multiple columns (example for Money: YearlyIncome.Amount, YearlyIncome.CurrencyCode).

All the hints I've found try to solve the problem using "spliton" within the query. But I would prefer a solution using a type handler, so I don't have to manually add it to every query.

I already tried to store the information in a single database column using a kind of separator between the properties. This basically works fine using a custom type handler - but the database at the end looks "ugly".

public class Recordlink
{
    public Guid Id { get; set; }
    public string Type { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    ...
}

public class Money
{
    public decimal Amount { get; set; }
    public string CurrencyCode { get; set; }
    ...
}

public class Contact
{
    Guid Id {get;set;}
    Money YearlyIncome {get;set;}
    Recordlink Company {get;set;}
}

I would like to achieve that when querying a list of contacts, I would just be able to access for example the property contacts[0].Company.Id (of course with a previous NULL check).

Because of so many different hints and answers to similar questions, I'm not sure if this is possible or not.

But even if this is not possible as I want to - I would prefer to know this instead of searching for ages for the solution.

Thanks and Regards

Markus

1

To the best of my knowledge you cannot do this in the way you are outlining here.

A standard custom typehandler looks like this:

public class MyTypeHandler : SqlMapper.TypeHandler<MyType>
{
    public override MyType Parse(object value)
    {
        return ...;
    }

    public override void SetValue(System.Data.IDbDataParameter parameter, MyType value)
    {
        parameter.Value = ...;
    }
}

So, the Parse method maps one item from the result row to your custom type. The SetValue method maps one instance of your custom type to one database parameter. Mapping multiple items of the result row to one object is not part of the possibilities.

In your shoes, instead of inventing my own property representation, I would serialize Money to JSON and save that in one column in the table. You could make a custom handler for that.

That could look something like this:

public class MoneyTypeHandler : SqlMapper.TypeHandler<Money>
{
    public override Money Parse(Type destinationType, object value)
    {
        return JsonConvert.DeserializeObject(value.ToString(), destinationType);
    }

    public override void SetValue(IDbDataParameter parameter, Money value)
    {
        parameter.Value = (value == null) ? (object)DBNull.Value : JsonConvert.SerializeObject(value);
        parameter.DbType = DbType.String;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks for the answer. First of all I'm glad to know, that it's not possible the way I thought - so I don't have to spent more time on trying this. In this case I think I need to use your idea of a json-string. It still not a "nice" result in the database, but at least it's a structured way of storing the information. Unfortunately I ran into the next problem - It seems to be a known bug, that the "SetValue" method of the type handler is not called during insert/update operations. I just did my first tests with parsing the data where it worked fine. Any ideas on that? – Markus H. Sep 10 '19 at 19:13
  • No, I haven't heard of that bug, so no ideas, sorry. – Palle Due Sep 11 '19 at 7:50
  • what if I want to split it on multiple columns without using JSON serialization? e.g. DTO has Address property of type Address (which is a ValueObject), and I want to split on columns named: [Address.Country], [Address.City], [Address.Street], etc. – Sergio Sep 21 at 20:53
  • @Sergio: That sounds like the original question. It's not possible without using spliton. – Palle Due Sep 22 at 8:16

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