75

I'm trying to use Net::HTTP.get() for an https URL:

@data = Net::HTTP.get(uri, Net::HTTP.https_default_port())

However, I get the following result when I try to print the results:

can't convert URI::HTTPS into String

What's the deal? I'm using Ruby 1.8.7 (OS X)

142

Original answer:

uri = URI.parse("https://example.com/some/path")
http = Net::HTTP.new(uri.host, uri.port)
http.use_ssl = true
@data = http.get(uri.request_uri)

As pointed out in the comments, this is more elegant:

require "open-uri"
@data = URI.parse("https://example.com/some/path").read
  • 7
    I'll give this as the answer because it's the answer to what I asked, but the real answer is to point out i'm approaching this the wrong way. Use URI.parse(uri_string).read instead, works so, so beautifully. – Tony Stark Apr 26 '11 at 7:18
  • 2
    What does VERIFY_NONE imply? What should possibly be done instead? – Jonathan Allard Dec 30 '11 at 22:58
  • 1
    that's a flag that means the veracity of the certificate is ignored, but this was a while ago so I'm not sure why you need to set it. – stef Jan 2 '12 at 9:02
  • 2
    @frabcus, you need to require 'open-uri' for the .read to work. – Josh D Jul 29 '13 at 12:04
  • 1
    There's nothing in the OP's question to imply that SSL verification isn't desired, so why are you suggesting VERIFY_NONE? – Alex Jul 28 '16 at 0:42
30

EDIT: My approach works, but @jason-yeo's approach is far easier.

It appears as of 2.1.2 the preferred a documented method is as follows (directly quoting the documentation):

HTTPS is enabled for an HTTP connection by #use_ssl=.

uri = URI('https://secure.example.com/some_path?query=string')

Net::HTTP.start(uri.host, uri.port,   
  :use_ssl => uri.scheme == 'https') do |http|
  request = Net::HTTP::Get.new uri

  response = http.request request # Net::HTTPResponse object 
end 

In previous versions of Ruby you would need to require ‘net/https’ to use HTTPS. This is no longer true.

  • 6
    This is not true. As of Ruby 2.0.0, Net::HTTP.get is sufficient to do a HTTPS get request if the URI object is passed a https url. See my answer: stackoverflow.com/a/36543895/382740. – Jason Yeo Apr 11 '16 at 8:50
16

In Ruby 2.0.0 and above, simply passing in an uri object with a https url is sufficient to do a HTTPS get request.

uri = URI('https://encrypted.google.com')
Net::HTTP.get(uri)

You may verify this by performing a get request on a domain with an expired certificate.

uri = URI('https://expired.badssl.com/')
Net::HTTP.get(uri)
# OpenSSL::SSL::SSLError: SSL_connect returned=1 errno=0 state=error: certificate verify failed

It was introduced by this commit in Ruby 2.0.0.

The get_response method, which is called by the Net::HTTP.get method, sets :use_ssl to true when the uri.scheme is "https".

Disclaimer: I understand that the question is for Ruby 1.8.7, but since this is one of the top few search results when one searches for "https ruby", I've decided to answer anyway.

  • 2
    As a data point, I have found this to not be true in ruby 2.2.10 . It did open the connection on port 443, but did not use SSL. Of course, the foreign server would have nothing to do with it, and closed the connection without a reply, leading to much teeth gnashing on my end. I had to call http.use_ssl = true to force it to actually use ssl, and then things went swimmingly. – David Hempy Apr 24 '18 at 18:59
4

this should look as:

uri.port = Net::HTTP.https_default_port()
@data = Net::HTTP.get(uri)
  • that worked, but now the external API is complaining that I sent a plain HTTP request to an HTTPS port... – Tony Stark Apr 26 '11 at 6:44
  • haha, right ;) see below solution Stef provided, it should work – Vlad Khomich Apr 26 '11 at 6:45
  • it doesn't, i get an error saying "undefined method `use_ssl='" – Tony Stark Apr 26 '11 at 6:53
  • 2
    try to also require 'net/https' – Vlad Khomich Apr 26 '11 at 6:54

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