124

Can anyone please tell me how to read only the first 6 months (7 columns) for each year of the data below, for example by using read.table()?

Year   Jan  Feb  Mar  Apr  May  Jun  Jul  Aug  Sep  Oct  Nov  Dec   
2009   -41  -27  -25  -31  -31  -39  -25  -15  -30  -27  -21  -25
2010   -41  -27  -25  -31  -31  -39  -25  -15  -30  -27  -21  -25 
2011   -21  -27   -2   -6  -10  -32  -13  -12  -27  -30  -38  -29
156

Say the data are in file data.txt, you can use the colClasses argument of read.table() to skip columns. Here the data in the first 7 columns are "integer" and we set the remaining 6 columns to "NULL" indicating they should be skipped

> read.table("data.txt", colClasses = c(rep("integer", 7), rep("NULL", 6)), 
+            header = TRUE)
  Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
1 2009 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
2 2010 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
3 2011 -21 -27  -2  -6 -10 -32

Change "integer" to one of the accepted types as detailed in ?read.table depending on the real type of data.

data.txt looks like this:

$ cat data.txt 
"Year" "Jan" "Feb" "Mar" "Apr" "May" "Jun" "Jul" "Aug" "Sep" "Oct" "Nov" "Dec"
2009 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39 -25 -15 -30 -27 -21 -25
2010 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39 -25 -15 -30 -27 -21 -25
2011 -21 -27 -2 -6 -10 -32 -13 -12 -27 -30 -38 -29

and was created by using

write.table(dat, file = "data.txt", row.names = FALSE)

where dat is

dat <- structure(list(Year = 2009:2011, Jan = c(-41L, -41L, -21L), Feb = c(-27L, 
-27L, -27L), Mar = c(-25L, -25L, -2L), Apr = c(-31L, -31L, -6L
), May = c(-31L, -31L, -10L), Jun = c(-39L, -39L, -32L), Jul = c(-25L, 
-25L, -13L), Aug = c(-15L, -15L, -12L), Sep = c(-30L, -30L, -27L
), Oct = c(-27L, -27L, -30L), Nov = c(-21L, -21L, -38L), Dec = c(-25L, 
-25L, -29L)), .Names = c("Year", "Jan", "Feb", "Mar", "Apr", 
"May", "Jun", "Jul", "Aug", "Sep", "Oct", "Nov", "Dec"), class = "data.frame",
row.names = c(NA, -3L))

If the number of columns is not known beforehand, the utility function count.fields will read through the file and count the number of fields in each line.

## returns a vector equal to the number of lines in the file
count.fields("data.txt", sep = "\t")
## returns the maximum to set colClasses
max(count.fields("data.txt", sep = "\t"))
  • 3
    @Andrie fortune(109) – James Apr 26 '11 at 10:20
  • 1
    @Benjamin Read the first couple of lines from the file using argument nrows. Then work out how many columns there are using ncol(), or however else you want to work out the number of columns to read/ignore. Then read the full file using this info. – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Nov 29 '12 at 0:42
  • 1
    ?? If you don't know the number of columns how else are you going to determine it without reading a bit of it to deduce how many there are? – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Nov 29 '12 at 0:45
  • 1
    @BlueMagister Thanks for the edit and the mentioning of the count.fields() which automates the process I suggested in the comments. – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson Sep 20 '13 at 19:03
  • 1
    @LéoLéopoldHertz준영 No, and I'm not sure how such a thing would work for row classes as in a data frame, whilst each column may be of a different type, each row is, by definition and as a result, unconstrained. You will need to filter out blank rows etc upon import. – Reinstate Monica - G. Simpson May 15 '17 at 18:53
67

To read a specific set of columns from a dataset you, there are several other options:

1) With freadfrom the data.table-package:

You can specify the desired columns with the select parameter from fread from the data.table package. You can specify the columns with a vector of column names or column numbers.

For the example dataset:

library(data.table)
dat <- fread("data.txt", select = c("Year","Jan","Feb","Mar","Apr","May","Jun"))
dat <- fread("data.txt", select = c(1:7))

Alternatively, you can use the drop parameter to indicate which columns should not be read:

dat <- fread("data.txt", drop = c("Jul","Aug","Sep","Oct","Nov","Dec"))
dat <- fread("data.txt", drop = c(8:13))

All result in:

> data
  Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
1 2009 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
2 2010 -41 -27 -25 -31 -31 -39
3 2011 -21 -27  -2  -6 -10 -32

UPDATE: When you don't want fread to return a data.table, use the data.table = FALSE-parameter, e.g.: fread("data.txt", select = c(1:7), data.table = FALSE)

2) With read.csv.sql from the sqldf-package:

Another alternative is the read.csv.sql function from the sqldf package:

library(sqldf)
dat <- read.csv.sql("data.txt",
                    sql = "select Year,Jan,Feb,Mar,Apr,May,Jun from file",
                    sep = "\t")

3) With the read_*-functions from the readr-package:

library(readr)
dat <- read_table("data.txt",
                  col_types = cols_only(Year = 'i', Jan = 'i', Feb = 'i', Mar = 'i',
                                        Apr = 'i', May = 'i', Jun = 'i'))
dat <- read_table("data.txt",
                  col_types = list(Jul = col_skip(), Aug = col_skip(), Sep = col_skip(),
                                   Oct = col_skip(), Nov = col_skip(), Dec = col_skip()))
dat <- read_table("data.txt", col_types = 'iiiiiii______')

From the documentation an explanation for the used characters with col_types:

each character represents one column: c = character, i = integer, n = number, d = double, l = logical, D = date, T = date time, t = time, ? = guess, or _/- to skip the column

  • fread does not support compressed files, however. Large files are usually compressed. – Deleet Feb 28 '16 at 9:03
  • There is a feature request for enabling this in fread. Worth noticing is that fread will highly probably read the uncompressed file considerably faster than read.table will read the compressed file. See here for an example. – Jaap Feb 28 '16 at 10:44
  • Some uncompressed files are too large. E.g. I'm working with 1000 Genomes files. They can be 60 GB uncompressed. – Deleet Feb 28 '16 at 10:45
  • As you probably know, R reads the data in memory. Whether you read the zipped file or the unzipped file doesn't make a difference on the size of the resulting data in memory. If you have 60GB in files, read.table won't save you. In that case, you might want to look at the ff-package. – Jaap Apr 20 '16 at 8:42
  • 2
    @Deleet You could use fread to read large compressed files like this: fread("gunzip -c data.txt.gz", drop = c(8:13)). – arekolek Jun 23 '16 at 9:41
8

You could also use JDBC to achieve this. Let's create a sample csv file.

write.table(x=mtcars, file="mtcars.csv", sep=",", row.names=F, col.names=T) # create example csv file

Download and save the the CSV JDBC driver from this link: http://sourceforge.net/projects/csvjdbc/files/latest/download

> library(RJDBC)

> path.to.jdbc.driver <- "jdbc//csvjdbc-1.0-18.jar"
> drv <- JDBC("org.relique.jdbc.csv.CsvDriver", path.to.jdbc.driver)
> conn <- dbConnect(drv, sprintf("jdbc:relique:csv:%s", getwd()))

> head(dbGetQuery(conn, "select * from mtcars"), 3)
   mpg cyl disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb
1   21   6  160 110  3.9  2.62 16.46  0  1    4    4
2   21   6  160 110  3.9 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4
3 22.8   4  108  93 3.85  2.32 18.61  1  1    4    1

> head(dbGetQuery(conn, "select mpg, gear from mtcars"), 3)
   MPG GEAR
1   21    4
2   21    4
3 22.8    4

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