2

I have written this simple class:

unit Test;

interface

uses
  SysUtils;

type
  TGram = class
  private
    instanceCreated: boolean;
    constructor Create;
  public
    procedure test;
  end;

implementation

constructor TGram.Create;
begin
  instanceCreated := true;
end;

procedure TGram.test;
begin
  if not instanceCreated
    then raise Exception.Create('The object has not been created.');
end;

end.

When I call the method test I got exception that it was not created.

var test: TGram;
begin
    test := TGram.create;
    test.test;
end

In the constructor the instanceCreated is set as true (I believe so) but when I try to access it later, it is not there. Why is it? How to correct this?

  • How do you suggest to change the Q? – Johny Bony Sep 11 at 7:31
  • Are you sure you need private constructor? – zed Sep 11 at 7:33
  • zed: Thank you! This is the answer! – Johny Bony Sep 11 at 7:35
7

You are call TGram.Create you call the public constructor of TObject rather than your constructor. That's because your constructor is private. Make you constructor public to see the behaviour you desire.

This is an excellent demonstration of the value of compile hints and warnings. The compiler emits this hint for your class:

[dcc32 Hint]: H2219 Private symbol 'Create' declared but never used

You should always heed hints and warnings and resolve them appropriately.

  • 3
    Calling the inherited constructor with inherited; inside the constructor is missing, too! – Delphi Coder Sep 11 at 8:51
  • @DelphiCoder That's true. In this case it doesn't matter because the TObject constrcutor does nothing. – David Heffernan Sep 11 at 8:54
  • @Delphi Code: Can you send a code that i may see how should it look? – Johny Bony Sep 12 at 9:19
  • 1
    It is not more than just adding the word inherited; as the first line inside the constructor of TGram – Delphi Coder Sep 12 at 20:07

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