2

I have a table core_message in Postgres, with millions of rows that looks like this (simplified):

┌────────────────┬──────────────────────────┬─────────────────┬───────────┬──────────────────────────────────────────┐
│    Colonne     │           Type           │ Collationnement │ NULL-able │                Par défaut                │
├────────────────┼──────────────────────────┼─────────────────┼───────────┼──────────────────────────────────────────┤
│ id             │ integer                  │                 │ not null  │ nextval('core_message_id_seq'::regclass) │
│ mmsi           │ integer                  │                 │ not null  │                                          │
│ time           │ timestamp with time zone │                 │ not null  │                                          │
│ point          │ geography(Point,4326)    │                 │           │                                          │
└────────────────┴──────────────────────────┴─────────────────┴───────────┴──────────────────────────────────────────┘
Index:
    "core_message_pkey" PRIMARY KEY, btree (id)
    "core_message_uniq_mmsi_time" UNIQUE CONSTRAINT, btree (mmsi, "time")
    "core_messag_mmsi_b36d69_idx" btree (mmsi, "time" DESC)
    "core_message_point_id" gist (point)

The mmsi column is a unique identifier used to identify ships in the world. I'm trying to get the latest row for each mmsi.

I can get that like this, for example:

SELECT a.* FROM core_message a
JOIN  (SELECT mmsi, max(time) AS time FROM core_message GROUP BY mmsi) b
       ON a.mmsi=b.mmsi and a.time=b.time;

But this is too slow, 2 seconds+.

So my solution was to create a distinct table containing only the latest rows (100K+ rows max) of the core_message table, called LatestMessage.

This table is populated via my application every time new rows have to be added to core_message.

It worked fine, I'm able to access the table in a matter of milliseconds. But I'd be curious to know if there is a better way to achieve that using only one table and keep the same level of performance for data access.

  • 2
    Possible duplicate of Select first row in each GROUP BY group? – Clockwork-Muse Sep 11 at 17:25
  • 1
    @Clockwork-Muse While this answer in itself does not solve my case, one of the answer referenced a way to solve my problem. I will post an answer here for my particular case using that way. – ogr Sep 11 at 18:42
  • There is some good information. It also matters how many millions of rows there are and how many distinct mmsi exactly (*100K+ rows max`?). And some other details - as instructed here – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 16 at 23:45
3

This answer seems to go in the way of the DISTINCT ON answer here, however it also mentions this :

For many rows per customer (low cardinality in column customer), a loose index scan (a.k.a. "skip scan") would be (much) more efficient, but that's not implemented up to Postgres 12. (An implementation for index-only scans is in development for Postgres 13. See here and here.)
For now, there are faster query techniques to substitute for this. In particular if you have a separate table holding unique customers, which is the typical use case. But also if you don't:

Using this other great answer, I find a way to keep the same performance as a distinct table with the use of LATERAL. By using a new table test_boats I can do something like this :

 CREATE TABLE test_boats AS (select distinct on (mmsi) mmsi from core_message);

This table creation take 40+ seconds which is pretty similar to the time taken by the other answer here.

Then, with the help of LATERAL :

SELECT a.mmsi, b.time
FROM test_boats a
CROSS JOIN LATERAL(
    SELECT b.time
    FROM core_message b
    WHERE a.mmsi = b.mmsi
    ORDER BY b.time DESC
    LIMIT 1
) b LIMIT 10;

This is blazingly fast, 1+ millisecond.

This will need the modification of my program's logic and the use of a query a bit more complex but I think I can live with that.

For a fast solution without the need to create a new table, check out the answer of @ErwinBrandstetter below


UPDATE: I feel this question is not quite answered yet, as it's not very clear why the other solutions proposed perform poorly here.

I tried the benchmark mentionned here. At first, it would seem that the DISTINCT ON way is fast enough if you do a request like the one proposed in the benchmark : +/- 30ms on my computer. But this is because that request uses index only scan. If you include a field that is not in the index, some_column in the case of the benchmark, the performance will drop to +/- 100ms.

Not a dramatic drop in performance yet. That is why we need a benchmark with a bigger data set. Something similar to my case : 40K customers and 8M rows. Here

Let's try again the DISTINCT ON with this new table:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (customer_id) id, customer_id, total 
FROM purchases_more 
ORDER BY customer_id, total DESC, id;

This takes about 1.5 seconds to complete.

SELECT DISTINCT ON (customer_id) *
FROM purchases_more 
ORDER BY customer_id, total DESC, id;

This takes about 35 seconds to complete.

Now, to come back to my first solution above. It is using an index only scan and a LIMIT, that's one of the reason why it is extremely fast. If I recraft that query to not use index-only scan and dump the limit :

SELECT b.*
FROM test_boats a
CROSS JOIN LATERAL(
    SELECT b.*
    FROM core_message b
    WHERE a.mmsi = b.mmsi
    ORDER BY b.time DESC
    LIMIT 1
) b;

This will take about 500ms, which is still pretty fast.

For a more in-depth benchmark of sort, see my other answer below.

2

You have put existing answers to good use and came up with great solutions in your own answer. Some missing pieces:

I'm still trying to understand how to properly use his first RECURSIVE solution ...

You used this query to create the test_boats table with unique mmsi:

select distinct on (mmsi) mmsi from core_message

For many rows per boat (mmsi), use this faster RECURSIVE solution instead:

WITH RECURSIVE cte AS (
   (
   SELECT mmsi
   FROM   core_message
   ORDER  BY mmsi
   LIMIT  1
   )
   UNION ALL
   SELECT m.*
   FROM   cte c
   CROSS  JOIN LATERAL (
      SELECT mmsi
      FROM   core_message
      WHERE  mmsi > c.mmsi
      ORDER  BY mmsi
      LIMIT  1
      ) m
   )
TABLE cte;

This hardly gets any slower with more rows per boat, as opposed to DISTINCT ON which is typically faster with only few rows per boat. Each only needs an index with mmsi as leading column to be fast.

If possible, create that boats table and add a FK constraint to it. (Means you have to maintain it.) Then you can go on using the optimal LATERAL query you have in your answer and never miss any boats. (Orphaned boats may be worth tracking / removing in the long run.)

Else, another iteration of that RECURSIVE query is the next best thing to get whole rows for the latest position of each boat quickly:

WITH RECURSIVE cte AS (
   (
   SELECT *
   FROM   core_message
   ORDER  BY mmsi DESC, time DESC  -- see below
   LIMIT  1
   )
   UNION ALL
   SELECT m.*
   FROM   cte c
   CROSS  JOIN LATERAL (
      SELECT *
      FROM   core_message
      WHERE  mmsi < c.mmsi
      ORDER  BY mmsi DESC, time DESC
      LIMIT  1
      ) m
   )
TABLE cte;

You have both of these indexes:

"core_message_uniq_mmsi_time" UNIQUE CONSTRAINT, btree (mmsi, "time")
"core_messag_mmsi_b36d69_idx" btree (mmsi, "time" DESC)

A UNIQUE constraint is implemented with all columns in default ASC sort order. That cannot be changed. If you don't actually need the constraint, you might replace it with a UNIQUE index, mostly achieving the same. But there you can add any sort order you like. Related:

But there is no need for the use case at hand. Postgres can scan a b-tree index backwards at practically the same speed. And I see nothing here that would require inverted sort order for the two columns. The additional index core_messag_mmsi_b36d69_idx is expensive dead freight - unless you have other use cases that actually need it. See:

To best use the index core_message_uniq_mmsi_time from the UNIQUE constraint I step through both columns in descending order. That matters.

  • I would be interested how the queries perform in your test setup - also after you drop the redundant index. – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 16 at 23:35
  • Thx for clarifying how this recursive works, and pointing the fact that I don't need another index with the unique constraint. As my index does not use NULL LAST, I had to remove those part in your query otherwise, the query never stopped. I will put a quick note regarding the performance of the queries. – ogr Sep 17 at 12:11
  • @ogr: Ah, right. No NULLS LAST here. That was misplaced, I removed it. – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 at 12:51
1

In Postgres, I recommend distinct on:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (mmsi) m.*
FROM core_message m
ORDER BY mmsi, time DESC;

For best performance, you want an index on (mmsi, time desc).

  • Yes, I tried that way before, unfortunately, it is actually worse than my request : 40+ seconds. and I already have an index on (mmsi, time desc). But I also have an unique index on (mmsi, time). This is mandatory, because I'm using Django, and it seems the ORM doesn't provide a way to index on a tuple with the DESC order : stackoverflow.com/questions/57874365/… – ogr Sep 11 at 16:29
  • 1
    @ogr . . . I am really surprised this is 20X slower than your version. DISTINCT ON usually has better performance than alternatives. – Gordon Linoff Sep 11 at 18:15
  • Having dig a bit more on other similar issue, this comment seems to confirm that DISTINCT ON is slower on large table : stackoverflow.com/questions/3800551/… My table has currently 8.652.526 rows – ogr Sep 11 at 18:26
  • 1
    @ogr . . . I don't think that comment is accurate; distinct on does use indexes. Follow Erwin's links to a more comprehensive benchmark on Postgres 9.4 and 9.5. He doesn't even consider doing a JOIN -- and from what I know of him, that is not a mistake, it is because he knows those would be slower. – Gordon Linoff Sep 11 at 21:42
  • 1
    turned out you were right, I first tried to bump his benchmark with a dataset that would match mine here. And for a moment, I thought the issue was there, but... it turns out the real problem is in the * in my request. The slow part here may be the loading time in memory of all the field. If you limit those field or use the LIMIT clause, it is very fast. Note that other methods like the one mentionned in my answer are still faster with the *. So, not sure why that is exactly... – ogr Sep 12 at 1:30
1

Another approach using ROW_NUMBER(), which is widely supported across RDBMS:

SELECT * 
FROM (
    SELECT 
        c.*,
        ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY mmsi ORDER BY time DESC) rn
    FROM core_message c
) AS cr WHERE rn = 1

This query should benefit of existing index core_messag_mmsi_b36d69_idx.

  • Unfortunately, it has the same performance as the solution proposed by @gordonlinoff, 40+ seconds – ogr Sep 11 at 16:39
1

Here is a quick performance comparison for the queries mention in this post.

Current setup :

The table core_message has 10,904,283 rows and there is 60,740 rows in test_boats (or 60,740 distinct mmsi in core_message).

And I'm using PostgreSQL 11.5

Query using index-only scan :

1) using DISTINCT ON :

SELECT DISTINCT ON (mmsi) mmsi 
FROM core_message;

2) using RECURSIVE with LATERAL:

WITH RECURSIVE cte AS (
   (
   SELECT mmsi
   FROM   core_message
   ORDER  BY mmsi
   LIMIT  1
   )
   UNION ALL
   SELECT m.*
   FROM   cte c
   CROSS  JOIN LATERAL (
      SELECT mmsi
      FROM   core_message
      WHERE  mmsi > c.mmsi
      ORDER  BY mmsi
      LIMIT  1
      ) m
   )
TABLE cte;

3) Using an extra table with LATERAL:

SELECT a.mmsi
FROM test_boats a
CROSS JOIN LATERAL(
    SELECT b.time
    FROM core_message b
    WHERE a.mmsi = b.mmsi
    ORDER BY b.time DESC
    LIMIT 1
) b;

Query not using index-only scan :

4) using DISTINCT ON with mmsi,time DESC INDEX:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (mmsi) * 
FROM core_message 
ORDER BY mmsi, time desc;

5) using DISTINCT ON with backward mmsi,time UNIQUE CONSTRAINT:

SELECT DISTINCT ON (mmsi) * 
FROM core_message 
ORDER BY mmsi desc, time desc;

6) using RECURSIVE with LATERAL and mmsi,time DESC INDEX:

WITH RECURSIVE cte AS (
   (
   SELECT *
   FROM   core_message
   ORDER  BY mmsi , time DESC 
   LIMIT  1
   )
   UNION ALL
   SELECT m.*
   FROM   cte c
   CROSS  JOIN LATERAL (
      SELECT *
      FROM   core_message
      WHERE  mmsi > c.mmsi
      ORDER  BY mmsi , time DESC 
      LIMIT  1
      ) m
   )
TABLE cte;

7) using RECURSIVE with LATERAL and backward mmsi,time UNIQUE CONSTRAINT:

WITH RECURSIVE cte AS (

   (

   SELECT *
   FROM   core_message
   ORDER  BY mmsi DESC , time DESC 
   LIMIT  1
   )
   UNION ALL
   SELECT m.*
   FROM   cte c
   CROSS  JOIN LATERAL (
      SELECT *
      FROM   core_message
      WHERE  mmsi < c.mmsi
      ORDER  BY mmsi DESC , time DESC 
      LIMIT  1
      ) m
   )
TABLE cte;

8) Using an extra table with LATERAL:

SELECT b.*
FROM test_boats a
CROSS JOIN LATERAL(
    SELECT b.*
    FROM core_message b
    WHERE a.mmsi = b.mmsi
    ORDER BY b.time DESC
    LIMIT 1
) b;

Using a dedicated table for the last message:

9) Here is my initial solution, using a distinct table with only the last message. This table is populated as new messages arrive but could also be created like so :

CREATE TABLE core_shipinfos AS (
    WITH RECURSIVE cte AS (
       (
       SELECT *
       FROM   core_message
       ORDER  BY mmsi DESC , time DESC 
       LIMIT  1
       )
       UNION ALL
       SELECT m.*
       FROM   cte c
       CROSS  JOIN LATERAL (
          SELECT *
          FROM   core_message
          WHERE  mmsi < c.mmsi
          ORDER  BY mmsi DESC , time DESC 
          LIMIT  1
          ) m
       )
    TABLE cte);

Then the request to get the latest message is as simple as that :

SELECT * FROM core_shipinfos;

Results :

Average of multiple query (around 5 for the fast one):

1) 9146 ms
2) 728 ms
3) 498 ms

4) 51488 ms
5) 54764 ms
6) 729 ms
7) 778 ms
8) 516 ms

9) 15 ms

Conclusion:

I won't comment on the dedicated table solution, and will keep that for the end.

The additional table (test_boats) solution is definitely the winner here but the RECURSIVE solution is also pretty efficient.

There is a huge gap in performance for the DISTINCT ON using index-only scan and the one not using it but, the performance gain is rather small for the other efficient query.

This makes sense as the major improvement those queries bring is the fact that they don't need to loop over the whole core_message table but only on a subset of the unique mmsi that is significantly smaller (60K+) in comparison to the core_message table size (10M+)

As an additional note, there does not seem to be significant improvement in performance for the queries using the UNIQUE CONSTRAINT if I drop the mmsi,time DESC INDEX. But dropping that index will of course save me some space (this index currently take 328MB)

About the dedicated table solution:

Each messages stored in the core_message table carries both positional informations (position, speed, heading,etc.) AND ship informations (name, callsign, dimensions, etc.), as well as ship identifier (mmsi).

To give a bit more background on what I'm actually trying to do : I'm implementing a backend to store messages emitted by ships via the AIS protocol.

As such, every unique mmsi I got, I got it via this protocol. It is not a pre-defined list. It keeps adding new MMSI until I got every ships in the world using AIS.

In that context, a dedicated table with ship informations as last message received makes sense.

I could avoid using such a table as we've seen with the RECURSIVE solution, but... a dedicated table is still 50x faster than this RECURSIVE solution.

That dedicated table is in fact similar to the test_boat table, with more information than just the mmsi field. As it is, having a table with mmsi only field or a table with every last informations of the core_message table add the same complexity to my application.

In the end, I think I will go for this dedicated table. It will gives me unbeatable speed and I'll still have the possibility to use the LATERAL trick on core_message, which will gives me more flexibility.

  • 1
    Thank you for sharing! Results agree with my experience. The dedicated table including the latest time is essentially a materialized view (MV) solution, where SELECT is expected to be very fast in comparison. Typically, ships move around constantly, producing a constant stream of new rows for core_message. Keeping the MV current means an extra UPDATE for every INSERT, roughly doubling the write cost. A simple table of unique ships is much cheaper, 1 INSERT for every new ship. You'll have weigh total costs against the faster SELECT. Whichever is worth more to you should win .. – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 at 22:04
  • 1
    BTW, removing the dupe index was not meant to improve the SELECT speed. It improves write speed and saves storage and added VACUUM cost. – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 at 22:04
  • I added a link to your new benchmark here. – Erwin Brandstetter Sep 17 at 22:14
  • SELECT on the latest message is definitely the top priority here. This will probably be about 90% of the queries done by the user and I want that to be as fast as possible. 15 ms essentially means that the database response will be negligeable beside network response time, for example. Currently, I use a buffer before inserting into the database, so it's not exacly real-time, but near real-time. For a buffer of 15 min worth of data, or about 250K rows, it took 1 min to insert all. On that 1 min, about 1 sec is used to insert rows in the MV, and the rest for the insert in core_message... – ogr Sep 17 at 23:37
  • I believe that is due to two things: 1) I only insert the latest messages of the buffer in that MV (only 30K rows). 2) the indexing probably took most of the insert time for the core_message table. In any case, 15:1 min is not so bad for my use case but I might try to optimized that later as 250K rows for 1 min seems rather slow. – ogr Sep 17 at 23:46

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