2

Given 2 similar python functions:

def get_text(filename):
    with open(filename, 'rb') as f:
       text = pickle.load(f)
    return text

and

def get_text2(filename):
     with open(filename, 'rb') as f:
         return pickle.load(f)

Would there be any performance difference betwen get_text and get_text2 ? Or will the python interpreter still have to do an assignment under the covers before returning?

This question is mostly about the assignment to a local variable before return -- the unpickling a file part is just a convenient example I had handy.

  • 3
    Probably, yes. dis indicates extra instructions (store_fast, load_fast) are required. But I doubt it's a bottleneck compared to actually reading the file. – jonrsharpe Sep 11 at 20:11
  • 2
    I'm not sure if the interpreter is even allowed to optimize that away. Theoretically you could inspect the call stack and check if text exists as a local variable in get_text. – Aran-Fey Sep 11 at 20:14
  • 2
    Why ask us? You have the ultimate authority in front of you. Use the timeit module to run empirical tests. – Prune Sep 11 at 20:16
  • Usually we don't worry about assignment times. That's just some pointer manipulation. Now new objects are created or copied. I would put the return outside the with context, – hpaulj Sep 11 at 20:58
  • Hey thanks for the great comments - @Prune I asked because I thought someone in the community would know and didn't know about the dis function to find out the instructions. And as for not worrying about assignment times, I agree but the question came up and I was curious. Maybe it makes a small difference for large files or a large quantity of files. – Justin Standard Sep 11 at 21:28
2

Thanks to @jonrsharpe for mentioning that I could dis this which I think provides the answer:

This done with python 3.7.1

>>> def get_text(filename):
...    with open(filename, 'rb') as f:
...       text = pickle.load(f)
...    return text
... 
>>> def get_text2(filename):
...    with open(filename, 'rb') as f:
...       return pickle.load(f)
... 
>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis(get_text)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (open)
              2 LOAD_FAST                0 (filename)
              4 LOAD_CONST               1 ('rb')
              6 CALL_FUNCTION            2
              8 SETUP_WITH              16 (to 26)
             10 STORE_FAST               1 (f)

  3          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (pickle)
             14 LOAD_METHOD              2 (load)
             16 LOAD_FAST                1 (f)
             18 CALL_METHOD              1
             20 STORE_FAST               2 (text)
             22 POP_BLOCK
             24 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
        >>   26 WITH_CLEANUP_START
             28 WITH_CLEANUP_FINISH
             30 END_FINALLY

  4          32 LOAD_FAST                2 (text)
             34 RETURN_VALUE
>>> dis.dis(get_text2)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (open)
              2 LOAD_FAST                0 (filename)
              4 LOAD_CONST               1 ('rb')
              6 CALL_FUNCTION            2
              8 SETUP_WITH              12 (to 22)
             10 STORE_FAST               1 (f)

  3          12 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (pickle)
             14 LOAD_METHOD              2 (load)
             16 LOAD_FAST                1 (f)
             18 CALL_METHOD              1
             20 RETURN_VALUE
        >>   22 WITH_CLEANUP_START
             24 WITH_CLEANUP_FINISH
             26 END_FINALLY
             28 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             30 RETURN_VALUE

The get_text2 version which returns right away avoids the STORE_FAST, POP_BLOCK and LOAD_FAST instructions -- but I agree the cost is probably negligible.

I think in many cases returning right away results in shorter cleaner code as well.

  • 1
    If you care about performance in small cases like these, Nuitka and Cython can compile and optimize pure-python code to be faster. – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Sep 12 at 0:51

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