-3

I am trying to make a function that does

IF X is true THEN call setFalse function ELSE don't call setFalseFunction

    this.state = {
      X: true,
      Y: true,
      Z: true,
    };
  }

  setFalse() {

    this.setState({

      X: true ? this.setState.setFalse() : !this.setState.setFalse()),
      Y: true ? this.setState.setFalse() : !this.setState.setFalse()),
      Z: true ? this.setState.setFalse() : !this.setState.setFalse())

    });
  }

But that's not seem to be working, I've also tried X = true? instead of X: true?, still no luck.

  • 5
    Why does it need to be a ternary operator? if (true) this.setState.setFalse();. – deceze Sep 12 at 7:44
  • 3
    !this.setState.setFalse() doesn't mean "don't call setFalse", it means "call setFalse then negate the result". Also you never refer to the current value of X, and if your new state depends on the old one you should use the callback form of setState. I'd strongly recommend reading a structured tutorial (see e.g. reactjs.org/docs/state-and-lifecycle.html). – jonrsharpe Sep 12 at 7:45
  • 3
    That is not how you use setState. But generally you can use && - condition && doStuff() will call doStuff only when condition is truthy. – Clarity Sep 12 at 7:45
  • I am checking for 3 different conditions and though using and if would make it longer. – Adam Khan Sep 12 at 7:49
  • 1
    it'd be helpful if you can show us the real code – Jee Mok Sep 12 at 7:49
0

If you want to do this -> "IF X is true THEN call setFalse function ELSE don't call setFalseFunction"

Then you don't need the setState for anything, because your not changing the state of your variables(X,Y,Z)! You want to simply verify if they're true and if they are, you want to call the function setFalse, correct?

You can achieve that by simply doing, E.g:

class App extends React.Component {
  state = {
    X: true,
    Y: true,
    Z: true,
  }

  setFalse() {
    console.log('I was called')
  }

  render() {
    const {X} = this.state

    return <div>{ X ? this.setFalse() : null }</div>
  }
}

Now, if you want to call the setFalse, and change the state of your variables, then you need to go into your function and do:

  setFalse() {
    console.log('I was called')

    this.setState({
      X: false,
    })
  }

Open your develop tools and see the state changing, got an example working here

I'd recommend you to see a little bit about lifecycle in React and study it

enter image description here

0

First of all, that's not have setState() is meant to be used, if you want a method that could make false all you states, you need to do the following:

this.state = {
  X: true,
  Y: true,
  Z: true,
};

// Change all the states to "false", without checking then
setFalse = () {
  this.setState({ X: false, Y: false, Z: false });
};

If what you want is to check the current value of every state, and then based on that, assign a new value, you could do:

setFalse = () => {
  const { X, Y, Z } = this.state;

  // If the states are "true", change them to "false"
  this.setState({ X: X ? !X : X, Y: Y ? !Y : Y, Z: Z ? !Z : Z });
};

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