152

I understand that they are both essentially the same thing, but in terms of style, which is the better (more Pythonic) one to use to create an empty list or dict?

11 Answers 11

234

In terms of speed, it's no competition for empty lists/dicts:

>>> from timeit import timeit
>>> timeit("[]")
0.040084982867934334
>>> timeit("list()")
0.17704233359267718
>>> timeit("{}")
0.033620194745424214
>>> timeit("dict()")
0.1821558326547077

and for non-empty:

>>> timeit("[1,2,3]")
0.24316302770330367
>>> timeit("list((1,2,3))")
0.44744206316727286
>>> timeit("list(foo)", setup="foo=(1,2,3)")
0.446036018543964
>>> timeit("{'a':1, 'b':2, 'c':3}")
0.20868602015059423
>>> timeit("dict(a=1, b=2, c=3)")
0.47635635255323905
>>> timeit("dict(bar)", setup="bar=[('a', 1), ('b', 2), ('c', 3)]")
0.9028228448029267

Also, using the bracket notation lets you use list and dictionary comprehensions, which may be reason enough.

6
  • 6
    Dict and list comprehensions can be done using the English names as well. Example: list(i for i in range(10) if i % 2)
    – Zags
    Jun 13, 2014 at 19:37
  • 4
    is there a reason why {} and [] are so much faster? I thought they were simply aliases.
    – Justin D.
    Nov 25, 2015 at 3:44
  • The timeit doesn't seem to give accurate time. As per the benchmark, it seems to take ~200ms which is way slower than normal http calls. Try running dict() normally in shell and then run timeit("dict()"), you would see visible difference in execution.
    – piyush
    May 26, 2017 at 14:04
  • 6
    @piyush Actually, the timeit() function reports the total amount of time to execute a specified number of iterations, which is 1000000 by default. So the examples above are the number of seconds to run the code snippet a million times. For example timeit('dict()', number=1) // -> 4.0531158447265625e-06 (one iteration) while timeit('dict()') // -> 0.12412905693054199(a million iterations) Jun 6, 2017 at 22:09
  • 1
    @GregHaskins so in that case, I don't see one should worry about using dict() or {}, unless looping through a million records & using dict() in the loop.
    – piyush
    Jun 17, 2017 at 9:24
55

In my opinion [] and {} are the most pythonic and readable ways to create empty lists/dicts.

Be wary of set()'s though, for example:

this_set = {5}
some_other_set = {}

Can be confusing. The first creates a set with one element, the second creates an empty dict and not a set.

7
  • 6
    {} always creates an empty dict. {1,2,3} creates a set in 2.7+ but is a syntax error in 2.6 and older versions. Apr 26, 2011 at 13:20
  • 2
    sorry? that's a variable with name some_epic_set that is pointing to an empty dict object... it's not an empty set. For an empty set you need to use set().
    – 6502
    Apr 26, 2011 at 13:21
  • 3
    @6502: Indeed, but it is a common pitfall that {5} creates a set with one element, 5 and {} is an empty dict.
    – orlp
    Apr 26, 2011 at 13:24
  • 1
    Wow, that was confusing. Still, it's not Fractal of Bad Design level of confusing. :-) Aug 21, 2012 at 12:45
  • 6
    @EnderLook: Actually, with generalized unpacking, you can use {*()} to make an empty set with literal syntax. I call it the one-eyed monkey operator. :-) Nov 9, 2018 at 4:15
20

The dict literal might be a tiny bit faster as its bytecode is shorter:

In [1]: import dis
In [2]: a = lambda: {}
In [3]: b = lambda: dict()

In [4]: dis.dis(a)
  1           0 BUILD_MAP                0
              3 RETURN_VALUE

In [5]: dis.dis(b)
  1           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (dict)
              3 CALL_FUNCTION            0
              6 RETURN_VALUE

Same applies to the list vs []

2
  • 8
    This assumes that BUILD_MAP and LOAD_GLOBAL are constant time and take the same amount of time. Highly unlikely. timeit gives a much better estimation.
    – Jamie Pate
    Jun 10, 2014 at 15:53
  • 1
    More likely, CALL_FUNCTION takes at least as much time as BUILD_MAP (the function being called essentially is BUILD_MAP), and LOAD_GLOBAL takes is just additional overhead.
    – chepner
    Nov 19, 2019 at 17:18
13

Be careful list() and [] works differently:

>>> def a(p):
...     print(id(p))
... 
>>> for r in range(3):
...     a([])
... 
139969725291904
139969725291904
139969725291904
>>> for r in range(3):
...     a(list())
... 
139969725367296
139969725367552
139969725367616

list() always creates a new object on the heap, but [] can reuse memory cells in many situations.

5

IMHO, using list() and dict() makes your Python look like C. Ugh.

4

In the case of difference between [] and list(), there is a pitfall that I haven't seen anyone else point out. If you use a dictionary as a member of the list, the two will give entirely different results:

In [1]: foo_dict = {"1":"foo", "2":"bar"}

In [2]: [foo_dict]
Out [2]: [{'1': 'foo', '2': 'bar'}]

In [3]: list(foo_dict)
Out [3]: ['1', '2'] 
1
  • You can get the same results as [foo_dict] by using list((foo_dict,)). The list() method takes an iterable as it's only parameter and iterates over it to add elements to the list. This will cause a similar pitfall by doing list(some_list) which will flatten the list.
    – sotrh
    Mar 26, 2018 at 21:33
2

There is no such difference between list() and [] but if you use it with iterators, it gives us:

nums = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8]

In: print([iter(nums)])

Out: [<list_iterator object at 0x03E4CDD8>]

In: print(list(iter(nums)))

Out: [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]

2

A difference between list() and [] not mentioned by anyone, is that list() will convert, for example a tuple, into a list. And [] will put said tuple into a list:

a_tuple = (1, 2, 3, 4)
test_list = list(a_tuple) # returns [1, 2, 3, 4]
test_brackets = [a_tuple] # returns [(1, 2, 3, 4)]
1

there is one difference in behavior between [] and list() as example below shows. we need to use list() if we want to have the list of numbers returned, otherwise we get a map object! No sure how to explain it though.

sth = [(1,2), (3,4),(5,6)]
sth2 = map(lambda x: x[1], sth) 
print(sth2) # print returns object <map object at 0x000001AB34C1D9B0>

sth2 = [map(lambda x: x[1], sth)]
print(sth2) # print returns object <map object at 0x000001AB34C1D9B0>
type(sth2) # list 
type(sth2[0]) # map

sth2 = list(map(lambda x: x[1], sth))
print(sth2) #[2, 4, 6]
type(sth2) # list
type(sth2[0]) # int
2
  • here seems to be an explanation of the behavior using example of the range() function >>> print(range(10)) # range(0, 10) range() behaves like a list, but it isn’t a list. It is an object which returns the successive items of from a sequence when you iterate over it, it doesn’t really make the list, saving space. such an object is iterable, that is, suitable as a target for functions and constructs that expect something from which they can obtain successive items until the supply is exhausted. The function list() creates lists from iterables: >>> list(range(5)) # [0, 1, 2, 3, 4]
    – sebtac
    May 22, 2018 at 3:45
  • 1
    the consequence is that [] stores the iterable object; list() creates list from the same iterable
    – sebtac
    May 22, 2018 at 3:50
-1

One of the other differences between a list() and []

list_1 = ["Hello World"] # is a list of the word "Hello World"
list_2 = list("Hello World") # is a list of letters 'H', 'e', 'l'... 

Something to keep in mind...

-4

A box bracket pair denotes one of a list object, or an index subscript, like my_List[x].

A curly brace pair denotes a dictionary object.

a_list = ['on', 'off', 1, 2]

a_dict = { on: 1, off: 2 }

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