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I have a .NET Core API using Entity Framework Core. We use .FromSQL() to execute stored procedures. The problem I'm having is we have two queries that return Account information - one for a single account and one for a paged list of accounts.

The account list returns a column for RowCount which the single account query does not return, so now the single account query returns an error (Rowcount returns the total number of accounts in the database, not just the accounts on the requested page so you know how many pages of data there are).

The error:

The required column 'RowCount' was not present in the results of a 'FromSql' operation

Here is the model

public class Account
{
    [Key]
    public long AccountId { get; set; }

    public string AccountName { get; set; }
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }
    public int RowCount { get; set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public bool Found => AccountId > 0;
}

And our dbContext

public class AccountDbContext : DbContext
{
    private DbSet<Account> TAccount { get; set; }

    public AccountDbContext(DbContextOptions<AccountDbContext> options) : base(options)
    {
    }

    public Account GetAccountById(long accountId)
    {
        var pAccount = new SqlParameter("accountId", accountId);
        Account account = TAccount.FromSql("EXEC dbo.SPR_Account_GetById @accountId", pAccount).FirstOrDefault();
        return account;
    }

    public List<Account> GetAccounts(int offset, int limit)
    {
        var pOffset = new SqlParameter("offset", offset);
        var pLimit = new SqlParameter("limit", limit);

        var dataSet = TAccount.FromSql($"EXEC dbo.SPR_Account_GetAll @offset=@offset,@limit=@limit", pOffset, pLimit).ToList();

        return dataSet;
    }
}

My question: is there a way to reuse this model for both queries? I think it's dumb to create a second model with identical properties. And I can never get entity to play nice with inheritance. It always gives me an error about Discrimitator not being found.

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  • 2
    Is it an option to change your GetById stored procedure to return a rowcount of 1?
    – Dennis VW
    Sep 13, 2019 at 16:59
  • Sure. Seems like a hack. I was hoping there was some attribute or config that I could use.
    – dreamer420
    Sep 13, 2019 at 17:23
  • It's by design. There are restrictions in the SQL you can use with the FromSql method. First, and most importantly, you must ensure that your results include columns for every property of the entity class that Entity Framework Core will create, and those columns must have the same names as those properties. You can only query for a specific entity class through its DbSet<T>, and related data cannot be included, which means you can’t query for classes unless they are part of the data model. Entity Framework Core will not create related objects, even if you include a JOIN in the raw SQL query.
    – Dennis VW
    Sep 13, 2019 at 17:25
  • I figured as much, I was just hoping there was a way to override this behavior like with using [NotMapped] for additional fields. Any ideas about my Discriminator error if I move rowcount to a subclass? ` public class AccountCount : Account { public int RowCount { get; set; } }`
    – dreamer420
    Sep 13, 2019 at 17:41
  • well, [NotMapped] would actually prevent it from even binding. But that means your row count would also not bind on your GetAll stored procedure, so that's no option. If you are able to influence or change the design of the database, then Entity Framework Core has more flexible support for views. Your view could return the needed row count and then your entity would be happy. Your inheritance option would throw you more difficulty in your path then just returning a row count of 1.
    – Dennis VW
    Sep 13, 2019 at 17:50

2 Answers 2

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Thanks to Chris Pratt and Dennis1679, I looked further into inheritance. Entity Framework doesn't like it when both a base class and derived class are registered as queryable types. I created a base class with the common properties and two derived classes: one for the single account and one for the list that includes the RowCount property. I'm not 100% happy with the fake inheritance, but I don't have to return a dummy RowCount from the stored proc and I don't have to duplicate my object.

public class AccountBase
{
    [Key]
    public long AccountId { get; set; }

    public string AccountName { get; set; }
    public bool IsDeleted { get; set; }

    [NotMapped]
    public bool Found => AccountId > 0;
}

public class AccountDataModel : AccountBase
{
}

public class AccountCount : AccountBase
{
   public int RowCount { get; set; }
}

Then, in my dbContext:

public class AccountDbContext : DbContext
{
    private DbSet<AccountDataModel> TAccount { get; set; }
    private DbSet<AccountCount> AccountList { get; set; }

    public AccountDbContext(DbContextOptions<AccountDbContext> options) : base(options)
    {
    }

    public Account GetAccountById(long accountId)
    {
        var pAccount = new SqlParameter("accountId", accountId);
        Account account = TAccount.FromSql("EXEC dbo.SPR_Account_GetById @accountId", pAccount).FirstOrDefault();
        return account;
    }

    public List<Account> GetAccounts(int offset, int limit)
    {
        var pOffset = new SqlParameter("offset", offset);
        var pLimit = new SqlParameter("limit", limit);

        var dataSet = AccountList.FromSql($"EXEC dbo.SPR_Account_GetAll @offset=@offset,@limit=@limit", pOffset, pLimit).ToList();

        return dataSet;
    }
}
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  • Sounds like a good use of inheritance - most designs involve a measure of compromise, so don't let perfect get in the way of good.
    – Michael
    Sep 14, 2019 at 7:09
1

In order to use FromSql with an entity, there must be a direct one-to-one correlation between what's returned and the properties on the entity. This is not optional and there is no alternative.

However, if you use a DTO class, you can do whatever you like. You just add it to your context like:

public DbQuery<AccountDTO> AccountDTOs { get; set; }

And then you can use FromSql on that instead, without any of the issues you're having.

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