15

We have a SQL Server with a few hundred databases. Many of the databases on that server are used only a few times per week. We have a problem where SQL Server sometimes becomes very slow. When that happens, memory usage indicates 99% and paging happens. In order to work around the problem we scheduled a restart of the SQL service every night to unload all those databases and free up memory.

What is the correct way of freeing up memory used by idle databases without taking the SQL Service down? We would like to automate the unloading of any database that was not accessed in the last 30 minutes.

Note: I'm looking for a solution that applies to SQL 2005. However, if there's a feature in SQL 2008 to do that I'd like to know about it.

10

SQL Server will free automatically all memory that can be freed and will avoid paging. If you encounter paging then the 99% memory is in use, is not available to be freed. You need to investigate how is the memory used, it is likely external components like sp_oa_xxx created object or distributed queries. Start by investigating the memory consumers, look at sys.dm_os_memory_clerks and read on How to use the DBCC MEMORYSTATUS command to monitor memory usage on SQL Server 2005.

As a side note, you already have the means to automatically close databases that are not is use: alter database <dbname> set auto_close on:

AUTO_CLOSE: When set to ON, the database is shut down cleanly and its resources are freed after the last user exits. The database automatically reopens when a user tries to use the database again.

If you host hundreds of databases that are used seldom then AUTO_CLOSE is exactly what you're looking for.

  • 1
    And obviously you need to validate that the memory is consumed by SQL Server to start with... – Remus Rusanu Apr 26 '11 at 19:11
  • 1
    AUTO_CLOSE: Closing the database immediately after the last connection exits is too aggressive. Our application connects and disconnects several times per minutes. I don't want to unload/load the database several times per minutes. I don't want to rely on application's connection pooling logic. A 30 minutes timeout would be more appropriate. – Sylvain Apr 26 '11 at 19:40
  • I will look at your links to investigate memory usage. – Sylvain Apr 26 '11 at 19:41
  • According to this page, auto close will be removed in a future version of SQL Server. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms135094.aspx. – Sylvain Apr 26 '11 at 19:48
  • You need to make up your mind. Is it 'only a few times per week' as declared in the OP, or is it 'connects and disconnects several times per minutes' ? – Remus Rusanu Apr 26 '11 at 20:14
4

To start I would suggest looking into:

DBCC FREEPROCCACHE

and

DBCC DROPCLEANBUFFERS

They aren't database specific but they can replace your nightly restart.

For a database specific command you could issue a CHECKPOINT which would force any dirty pages to disk but it only applies to writes.

In SQL Server 2008 (and R2) Enterprise Edition you can utilize the Resource Governor to slice up your memory into pools and dedicate a larger portion to the critical databases allowing a more granular control of CPU and memory. To do this correctly requires thorough planning and testing however.

  • If you post code, XML or data samples, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code samples" button ( { } ) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Apr 26 '11 at 20:27
2

Try this:

ALTER DATABASE blah SET AUTO_CLOSE ON;

This setting (which is normally not recommended for production) might be appropriate for your case. This setting will work in SQL Server 2005 and 2008.

For more information: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb522682.aspx

  • If you post code, XML or data samples, please highlight those lines in the text editor and click on the "code samples" button ( { } ) on the editor toolbar to nicely format and syntax highlight it! – marc_s Apr 26 '11 at 20:28
1

For MSSQL 2012; run first following

EXEC sys.sp_configure N'max server memory (MB)', N'256'
GO
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO

then check for Task Manager to see the memory is down to 256 MB (or higher as you set above)

Then run this (replace 2048 with MB you want to assign regularly):

EXEC sys.sp_configure N'max server memory (MB)', N'2048'
GO
RECONFIGURE WITH OVERRIDE
GO
  • You advise them to this on a production server? – SchmitzIT Jan 24 '15 at 19:03
  • Sure you can. Yet, the timing will be very mission critical. Prefer to do it out of work hours or whenever the work balance is @ lowest point. – HGMamaci Jan 30 '15 at 15:32
0

I had such problem before and I found a solution for this issue you can create a stored procedure as described below : before you start your application, you should call this stored procedure in Mode 1 because you need enough memory

For SQL operations and before closing your application you have to call this stored procedure again in Mode 0

Create Proc [dbo].[MP_Rpt_ConfigureMemory]
    (@Mode bit)
as
    declare @RAM as integer
    declare @MAX as integer
    declare @MIN as integer

    set @RAM = (SELECT
                   [physical_memory_in_bytes]/1048576 AS [RAM (MB)]
                FROM [sys].[dm_os_sys_info])

    Set @MAX = ((@RAM / 4) * 3) 
    Set @MIN = ((@RAM / 4) * 1) 

    if @Mode = 0
    begin
         exec SP_Configure 'min server memory', 1
         RECONFIGURE

         exec SP_Configure 'max server memory', 100
         RECONFIGURE
    end
    else
       if @Mode = 1
       begin
           exec SP_Configure 'max server memory', @MAX
           RECONFIGURE
           exec SP_Configure 'min server memory', @MIN
           RECONFIGURE
       end
  • next time you post the same answer to a question, please c&p the formatted version ;-) – kleopatra Nov 28 '12 at 13:17
  • @kleopatra i'm sorry , i didn't get your mean :( – Masoud Sahabi Nov 28 '12 at 13:47
  • nothing bad, just a reminder to not mix code and normal text: as you accidentally did by the four leading spaces of your intro text. Which I edited here and in your previous answer - lazy me hopes that I won't have to do it again in your next :-) – kleopatra Nov 28 '12 at 13:50

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