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I have the following code in apps.py:

class Pqawv1Config(AppConfig):
    # ...
    def ready(self):
        env_run_main=os.environ.get('RUN_MAIN')
        print('IS_PRODUCTION=%s, RUN_MAIN=%s' % (settings.IS_PRODUCTION, env_run_main))
        if (not settings.IS_PRODUCTION) and (env_run_main != 'true'):
            print('Exiting because detected running in reloader.')
            return

        print('Starting up for PID=%s, argv=%s...' % (os.getpid(), sys.argv))
        # Initialization of a singleton object from a C++ DLL
        # Raise an exception if this library was already initialized in this process

In the evening I restarted the server and it printed the following in the log as expected:

[Sun Sep 15 22:50:34.928549 2019] [wsgi:error] [pid 11792:tid 1176] Starting up for PID=11792, argv=['mod_wsgi']...\r

However, in the morning I noticed that something strange has happened. It looks like Apache started a new thread for the web application:

[Mon Sep 16 04:10:41.224464 2019] [wsgi:error] [pid 11792:tid 1160] Starting up for PID=11792, argv=['mod_wsgi']...\r

And later:

[Mon Sep 16 07:16:21.028429 2019] [mpm_winnt:error] [pid 11792:tid 2272] AH00326: Server ran out of threads to serve requests. Consider raising the ThreadsPerChild setting

I think it's not the issue of calling AppConfig.ready() method twice because there were requests to the website in between and they were handled well. It rather looks like Django's AppConfig.ready() method is called once per worker thread of Apache process. Is this so? In this case, how to run the code once per process, rather than once per thread in Django powered by Apache and mod-wsgi?

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    .ready() should be called only once, by the first thread that's ready, as you can see here: github.com/django/django/blob/master/django/apps/… At the end of the block, the .ready property is set to true to prevent it from being run again. Did your web server maybe restart and that restarted the Django app? – C14L Sep 23 '19 at 19:19
  • @C14L, thanks for the comment. Probably the server restarted indeed, however, then it's strange that the process got exactly the same PID. Usually, the OS assigns random PIDs. So it looks like a restart without restarting the OS process. The singleton object from the DLL was still alive - that's how I detected that .ready() is called the second time. – Serge Rogatch Sep 24 '19 at 5:47
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This might be a non-answer depending on your apache config. However, most apache mod_wsgi configs recommend you implement some sort of max_requests before restarting the wsgi process. Its possible your code is doing this either based off normal requests, or perhaps your code is hitting a django exception.

In both cases, you should be able to tell this by apache config or options alone.

https://modwsgi.readthedocs.io/en/develop/configuration-directives/WSGIDaemonProcess.html

Some worthwhile options to look out for

restart-interval=sss

Defines a time limit in seconds for how long a daemon process should run before being restarted.

This might be use to periodically force restart the WSGI application processes when you have issues related to Python object reference count cycles, or incorrect use of in memory caching, which causes constant memory growth.

If this option is not defined, or is defined to be 0, then the daemon process will be persistent and will continue to service requests until Apache itself is restarted or shutdown.

Avoid setting this too low. This is because the constant restarting and reloading of your WSGI application may cause unecessary load on your system and affect performance.

You can use the graceful-timeout option in conjunction with this option to reduce the chances that an active request will be interrupted when a restart occurs due to the use of this option.

maximum-requests=nnn

Defines a limit on the number of requests a daemon process should process before it is shutdown and restarted.

This might be use to periodically force restart the WSGI application processes when you have issues related to Python object reference count cycles, or incorrect use of in memory caching, which causes constant memory growth.

If this option is not defined, or is defined to be 0, then the daemon process will be persistent and will continue to service requests until Apache itself is restarted or shutdown.

Avoid setting this to a low number of requests on a site which handles a lot of traffic. This is because the constant restarting and reloading of your WSGI application may cause unecessary load on your system and affect performance. Only use this option if you have no other choice due to a memory usage issue. Stop using it as soon as any memory issue has been resolved.

You can use the graceful-timeout option in conjunction with this option to reduce the chances that an active request will be interrupted when a restart occurs due to the use of this option.

inactivity-timeout=sss

Defines the maximum number of seconds allowed to pass before the daemon process is shutdown and restarted when the daemon process has entered an idle state. For the purposes of this option, being idle means there are no currently active requests and no new requests are being received.

This option exists to allow infrequently used applications running in a daemon process to be restarted, thus allowing memory being used to be reclaimed, with process size dropping back to the initial startup size before any application had been loaded or requests processed.

Note that after any restart of the WSGI application process, the WSGI application will need to be reloaded. This can mean that the first request received by a process after the process was restarted can be slower. If you WSGI application has a very high startup cost on CPU and time, it may not be a good idea to use the option.

See also the request-timeout option for forcing a process restart when requests block for a specified period of time.

Note that similar functionality to that of the request-timeout option, for forcing a restart when requests blocked, was part of what was implemented by the inactivity-timeout option. The request timeout was broken out into a separate feature in version 4.1.0 of mod_wsgi.

request-timeout=sss

Defines the maximum number of seconds that a request is allowed to run before the daemon process is restarted. This can be used to recover from a scenario where a request blocks indefinitely, and where if all request threads were consumed in this way, would result in the whole WSGI application process being blocked.

How this option is seen to behave is different depending on whether a daemon process uses only one thread, or more than one thread for handling requests, as set by the threads option.

If there is only a single thread, and so the process can only handle one request at a time, as soon as the timeout has passed, a restart of the process will be initiated.

If there is more than one thread, the request timeout is applied to the average running time for any requests, across all threads. This means that a request can run longer than the request timeout. This is done to reduce the possibility of interupting other running requests, and causing a user to see a failure. So where there is still capacity to handle more requests, restarting of the process will be delayed if possible.

deadlock-timeout=sss

Defines the maximum number of seconds allowed to pass before the daemon process is shutdown and restarted after a potential deadlock on the Python GIL has been detected. The default is 300 seconds.

This option exists to combat the problem of a daemon process freezing as the result of a rogue Python C extension module which doesn’t properly release the Python GIL when entering into a blocking or long running operation.

startup-timeout=sss

Defines the maximum number of seconds allowed to pass waiting to see if a WSGI script file can be loaded successfully by a daemon process. When the timeout is passed, the process will be restarted.

This can be used to force the reloading of a process when a transient issue occurs on the first attempt to load the WSGI script file, but subsequent attempts still fail because a Python package that was loaded has retained state that prevents attempts to run initialisation a second time within the same process. The Django package can cause this scenario as the initialisation of Django itself can no longer be attempted more than once in the same process.

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