30

I am trying to write a generic function which takes input as uint8, uint16, uint32, uint64, .... and return the maximum value with the datatype of largest element?

For example:

template < typename T, typename X>
auto Max_Number(T valueA, X valueB)
{
    if (valueA > valueB)
        return valueA;
    else
        return valueB;
}

P.S: this example assumes the largest element is of the largest datatype.

  • 6
    take a look at std::variant That's probably the closest since C++ is strongly typed – doug Sep 16 at 6:33
  • There might be some template wizards that could suggest something, but I'm fairly certain that the return type must be fixed – selbie Sep 16 at 6:34
  • 6
    Have you tried to use plain std::max? Remember that integer types can safely be implicitly converted to a larger type. – Some programmer dude Sep 16 at 6:36
  • @Someprogrammerdude Yep, that should work given his example's statement that the largest arg magnitude is also the largest datatype applies in all other cases. – doug Sep 16 at 6:42
  • Are the arguments always unsigned? It's not clear because of that "...". If they are, I would use simply uintmax_t Max_Number(uintmax_t a, uintmax_t b) .... – Daniel Langr Sep 16 at 7:34
26

The return type must be determined at compile-time. You might use std::common_type (since C++11):

For arithmetic types not subject to promotion, the common type may be viewed as the type of the (possibly mixed-mode) arithmetic expression such as T0() + T1() + ... + Tn().

template < typename T, typename X>
typename std::common_type<T, X>::type Max_Number ( T valueA, X valueB ) {
    ...
}

Or use std::conditional (since C++11) to declare the return type as the big one (whose sizeof is greater).

template < typename T, typename X>
typename std::conditional<sizeof(T) >= sizeof(X), T, X>::type Max_Number ( T valueA, X valueB ) {
    ...
}

Note that for this case, if T and X have the same size, T will always be used as the return type. If you want to control it more precisely, you can use some traits to specify the exact type.

  • 6
    The latter solution has the potential downside of not being commutative when T and X have the same size, e.g. on my system Max_Number(1L, 2.0) returns a long int and Max_Number(2.0, 1L) returns a double. (Also, the std::conditional_t helper is only available in C++14.) – David Sep 16 at 21:29
12

Here is an example solution with std:: variant

template < typename T, typename X> 
std::variant<T, X>  Max_Number ( T valueA, X valueB )
{
    std::variant<T, X> res;
    if ( valueA > valueB ) 
       res = valueA; 
    else 
       res = valueB; 
    return res;
}
  • 5
    While this is correct, std::variant might be a overkill for the certain case, as other elegent solutions are available purely using C++11. – Const Sep 16 at 19:32
  • 1
    @Const all other solutions determine the type at compile time, which means that the resulting type depends only on the types of the parameters and not their values. In this solution the active return type is the type of the variable with the max value. So it's really apples and oranges and serve different situations. If you want the type to be the type of the max value, then this is the best solution. – bolov Sep 19 at 8:04
9

The Trailing return with a conditional operator is another way to go, which is available since .

(See online live)

template <typename T, typename X>
constexpr auto Max_Number(T valueA, X valueB)-> decltype(valueA > valueB ? valueA : valueB)
{
    return valueA > valueB ? valueA : valueB;
}

See some advantages of using trailing return type here: Advantage of using trailing return type in C++11 functions

  • instead of the ? expression you could use valueA + valueB – Wouter van Ooijen Oct 5 at 21:28

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