2

Working with Entity Framework and Razor pages, I've currently got a system going where I wrap my models inside of view models and display them to the screen, which I think is what I'm supposed to be doing in the MVVM architecture.

However, I'm having some trouble casting a list of type 'Foo' to type 'FooView', but casting a variable of type 'Foo' to type 'FooView' is fine. Here is the code:

Student Class

public class Student
{
    public Student()
    {
        Id = null;
        FirstName = "";
        Surname = "";
        Age = 0;
        DateOfBirth = new DateTime();
        Results = new HashSet<Result>();
    }

    public Student(string firstName, string surname, DateTime dateOfBirth)
    {
        Id = null;
        FirstName = firstName;
        Surname = surname;
        DateOfBirth = dateOfBirth;
        Results = new HashSet<Result>();
    }

    public int? Id { get; set; }

    public string FirstName { get; set; }

    public string Surname { get; set; }

    public int Age { get; private set; }

    // Implement backing field
    private DateTime _dateOfBirth;
    public DateTime DateOfBirth
    {
        get => _dateOfBirth;

        set
        {
            // Set Age when date of birth is provided
            _dateOfBirth = value;
            Age = (DateTime.Today.Year - this._dateOfBirth.Year);
            if (_dateOfBirth.Date > DateTime.Today.AddYears(-this.Age)) this.Age--;
        }
    }

    public HashSet<Result> Results { get; set; }

    public static implicit operator StudentView(Student student)
    {
        return new StudentView(student);
    }

}

Successfully casting student item to student view item on razor page WORKS

@foreach (var item in Model.Result)
{
    <tr>
        <td>
            @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => ((StudentView)item.Student).FullName)
        </td>
        <td>
            @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => item.Score)
        </td>
        <td>
            @Html.DisplayFor(modelItem => item.Grade)
        </td>
        <td>
            <a asp-page="./Edit" asp-route-id="@item.Id">Edit</a> |
            <a asp-page="./Details" asp-route-id="@item.Id">Details</a> |
            <a asp-page="./Delete" asp-route-id="@item.Id">Delete</a>
        </td>
    </tr>
}

Trying to cast list to type 'Student View' FAILS

public async Task OnGetAsync()
{
    Student = await _context.Student.Cast<StudentView>().ToListAsync();
}

InvalidCastException: Unable to cast object of type 'StudentManagerDemoCore.Models.Student' to type 'StudentManagerDemoCore.ViewModels.StudentView'.

StudentManagerDemoCore.Pages.Teacher.ManageStudent.IndexModel.OnGetAsync() in Index.cshtml.cs

Student = await _context.Student.Cast<StudentView>().ToListAsync();

I have a feeling there is just something little I'm missing here, but I'm not sure what it is. The error implies there is an issue with my casting method, but that doesn't explain why it works sometimes.

Anyone know where I'm going wrong?

5
  • 1
    Look at this project: automapper.org
    – kmatyaszek
    Sep 16, 2019 at 16:06
  • Please don't post exceptions as screenshots. Post them as text.
    – dymanoid
    Sep 16, 2019 at 16:15
  • @dymanoid Hi, I'd be happy to, but unsure of the format to post them in. I thought it'd take up a large chunk of the question otherwise.
    – DubDub
    Sep 17, 2019 at 8:32
  • You can cut-out the irrelevant stack frames to shorten the stack trace. But generally it's not a problem to post a large exception text.
    – dymanoid
    Sep 17, 2019 at 8:34
  • Found the following which heavily relates: codeproject.com/Articles/1043977/…
    – DubDub
    Sep 17, 2019 at 9:29

3 Answers 3

3

You have several options to solve your issue.

The first solution would be to manually do something like this:

await _context.Student.Select(student => new StudentView()
{
    Id = student.Id,
    //....
}

Another solution would be to have a manual mapper that will perform the mapping. A static function that takes a Student and converts it to a StudentView and returns it. You can reuse it elsewhere.

The best solution that I would suggest is to use AutoMapper.

2
  • Hi, the first solution does work, but I've got a constructor that takes a parameter of type 'Student' so that works as well. While it does work, I was trying to do it using the conversion method in the 'Student' class so I had a consistent way of casting between Student and StudentView across the project, rather than sometimes using a constructor.
    – DubDub
    Sep 17, 2019 at 8:50
  • Also, that AutoMapper project looks very interesting, thankyou for making me aware of it.
    – DubDub
    Sep 17, 2019 at 8:50
1

From MSDN (my emphasis):

The source sequence for this method is IEnumerable, which means the elements have the compile-time static type of object. The only type conversions that are performed by this method are reference conversions and unboxing conversions. The runtime type of the elements in the collection must match the target type, or in the case of value types, the runtime type of elements must be the result of a boxing conversion of the target type. Other conversion types, such as those between different numeric types, are not allowed.

So, for your specific case, as you defined an implicit conversion between Student and StudentView do the following instead:

public async Task OnGetAsync()
{
    Student = await _context.Student.Select(x=>(StudentView)x).ToListAsync();
}
5
  • Not really. The model class and the view model class are usually two completely unrelated classes with no simple casting between them. It doesn't matter you cast with Cast or with (T), if one doesn't work, the other doesn't work too. Sep 16, 2019 at 16:20
  • @WiktorZychla OP Student class defines a implicit conversion between Student and StudentView, so (T) works. But as Cast only do unboxing and reference conversion, it doesn't call the implicit conversion.
    – Magnetron
    Sep 16, 2019 at 16:24
  • My bad, the operator is indeed down there in the snippet. Sep 16, 2019 at 16:44
  • Hi, I've already tried this solution as I also expected it to cast properly should I select the way you've described (should have mentioned I gave it a go in OP) but ran into another error: (No coercion operator is defined between types 'StudentView' and 'Student'.) Which is strange. The following does work though (Select(x=> new StudentView(x))) Which is exactly the same as the conversion method.
    – DubDub
    Sep 17, 2019 at 8:30
  • I'm more curious as to why the casting is throwing a wobbly, because I thought I had it all defined correctly and it seems more intuitive to cast a list of students to a list of student views, rather than create a list of student views from a list of students, but I guess that's how it is. Currently I've only got the cast going one way, Student > StudentView, do I perhaps need it the other way?
    – DubDub
    Sep 17, 2019 at 8:32
0

I managed to solve the problem by also implementing a conversion in the 'StudentView' class from 'StudentView' to 'Student' and then using Magnetron's solution.

So I implemented a conversion in the 'View' class. Why this is needed I have no idea, seems magical to me considering this conversion shouldn't be necessary for the conversion of 'Student' to 'StudentView'. Perhaps there is something written somewhere that a two way cast is required for some reason.

public class StudentView : ViewBase<Student>
{
    // Removed for brevity

    public static implicit operator Student(StudentView student)
    {
        return new Student(student);
    }

}

Then updated the casting to be performed like so as highlighted by Magnetron:

    public async Task OnGetAsync()
    {
        Student = await _context.Student.Select(x => (StudentView)x).ToListAsync();
    }

I'd also like to highlight billybob's answer as he provided another correct way to solve the solution, I just chose a different way.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.