17

I don't quite understand how to properly store subscribers inside a class so that they persist but don't prevent the object from being deinitialized. Here's an example where the object won't deinit:

import UIKit
import Combine

class Test {
    public var name: String = ""

    private var disposeBag: Set<AnyCancellable> = Set()

    deinit {
        print("deinit")
    }

    init(publisher: CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>) {
        publisher.assign(to: \.name, on: self).store(in: &disposeBag)
    }
}

let publisher = CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>("Test")

var test: Test? = Test(publisher: publisher)
test = nil

When I replace the assign with a sink (in which I properly declare [weak self]) it actually does deinit properly (probably because the assign accesses self in a way that causes problems).

How can I prevent strong reference cycles when using .assign for instance?

Thanks

  • 1
    This must be a bug in Combine as this would seem to be a fairly common use case. Work around for now is to use sink. – Tylerc230 Nov 7 '19 at 19:19
12
0

you can replace .asign(to:) with sink where [weak self] in its closure brake the memory cycle. Try it in Playground to see the difference

final class Bar: ObservableObject {
    @Published var input: String = ""
    @Published var output: String = ""

    private var subscription: AnyCancellable?

    init() {
        subscription = $input
            .filter { $0.count > 0 }
            .map { "\($0) World!" }
            //.assignNoRetain(to: \.output, on: self)
            .sink { [weak self] (value) in
                self?.output = value
        }

    }

    deinit {
        subscription?.cancel()
        print("\(self): \(#function)")
    }
}

// test it!!
var bar: Bar? = Bar()
let foo = bar?.$output.sink { print($0) }
bar?.input = "Hello"
bar?.input = "Goodby,"
bar = nil

it prints

Hello World!
Goodby, World!
__lldb_expr_4.Bar: deinit

so we don't have the memory leak !

finally at forums.swift.org someone make a nice little

extension Publisher where Self.Failure == Never {
    public func assignNoRetain<Root>(to keyPath: ReferenceWritableKeyPath<Root, Self.Output>, on object: Root) -> AnyCancellable where Root: AnyObject {
        sink { [weak object] (value) in
        object?[keyPath: keyPath] = value
    }
  }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Oh, I haven't seen the edit with the new assignNoRetain method. Thanks! That's a nice way of hiding the sink – Quantm Apr 5 at 11:21
4
0

I found this solution at forums.swift.org

extension Publisher where Failure == Never {

    func assign<Root: AnyObject>(to keyPath: ReferenceWritableKeyPath<Root, Output>, on root: Root) -> AnyCancellable {
       sink { [weak root] in
            root?[keyPath: keyPath] = $0
        }
    }
}

Does anybody understand this? Has the solution any side effects?

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Well, this is a simple wrapper on sink that uses a weak reference to root to prevent a reference cycle. It also mimics the API of assign. It's a nice solution that hides the sink closure. There shouldn't be any side effects. The only thing I would change is the method's name, from assign to something likeassignWeak or so because I'm not sure if this could collide with the original assign method in Publisher. Thanks for this! – Quantm Apr 5 at 11:20
2
0

I don't know what you have against closures but the solution is to not use self in the assign:

import Combine
import SwiftUI

class NameStore {
    var name: String
    init() { name = "" }
    deinit { print("deinit NameStore") }
}

class Test {
    private var nameStore = NameStore()
    public var name: String { get { return nameStore.name } }

    var subscriber: AnyCancellable? = nil

    deinit { print("deinit Test") }

    init(publisher: CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>) {
        subscriber = publisher.print().assign(to: \NameStore.name, on: nameStore)
    }
}

let publisher = CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>("Test")
var test: Test? = Test(publisher: publisher)

struct ContentView : View {
    var body: some View {
        Button(
            action: { test = nil },
            label: {Text("test = nil")}
        )
    }
}

As far as I can see weak references are only allowed in closures so that wasn't the answer. Putting the reference into another object meant that both could be released.

I added a ContentView because it makes it easier to play with and I added a print to the pipeline to see what was happening. The computed name is probably not necessary, it just made it look the same as you had. I also removed the Set, it's probably useful but I haven't worked out when.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks. It seems impractical at first to not be able to assign to variables in self but I guess I have to get used to it or use a sink. The set is great when you have many different subscribers that need to be stored. Having a dozen AnyCancellable variables seems impractical – Quantm Sep 18 '19 at 17:07
  • Maybe it's time for you to write a bug report or at least leave a negative feedback. – Michael Salmon Sep 19 '19 at 6:51
  • I probably should because this is even more inconvenient when you try to observe changes to those properties. Having them in a different class requires you to add all kinds of boilerplate code to observe changes to it. But I simply don't want to believe that Apple hasn't thought of this. There has to be a way to do it – Quantm Sep 19 '19 at 12:34
  • @MichaelSalmon You can use .store when Set<AnyCancellable> is optional see stackoverflow.com/a/60027659/4067700 – Victor Kushnerov Feb 3 at 8:29
0
0

You should remove stored AnyCancellable from disposeBag to release Test instance.

import UIKit
import Combine

private var disposeBag: Set<AnyCancellable> = Set()

class Test {
    public var name: String = ""


    deinit {
        print("deinit")
    }

    init(publisher: CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>) {
        publisher.assign(to: \.name, on: self).store(in: &disposeBag)
    }
}

let publisher = CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>("Test")

var test: Test? = Test(publisher: publisher)
disposeBag.removeAll()
test = nil

or use optional disposeBag

import UIKit
import Combine

class Test {
    public var name: String = ""
    private var disposeBag: Set<AnyCancellable>? = Set()

    deinit {
        print("deinit")
    }

    init(publisher: CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>) {
        guard var disposeBag = disposeBag else { return }
        publisher.assign(to: \.name, on: self).store(in: &disposeBag)
    }
}

let publisher = CurrentValueSubject<String, Never>("Test")

var test: Test? = Test(publisher: publisher)
test = nil
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.