-5

My Java 8 applet connects to an SQL database and displays the result of a "select" statement in a JTable with two columns:

If the String in row 1/ColumnA isn't the same as the String in row 0/ColumnA, I want to give row 1 a grey background color (to mark the start of "new" data), the other rows should use the default white color.

Code for creating the table:

JTable myTable = new JTable();
myTable.setSelectionModel(new ToggleListSelectionModel()); //custom selection model
myTable.setModel(new DefaultTableModel(
    new Object[][] {
    },
    new String[] {
        "ColumnA", "ColumnB"
    }
));

Getting the data and filling the table:

Statement stat = connection.createStatement();
ResultSet rs = stat.executeQuery(someSelectStatement);
Object[] row = null;

while(rs.next()) {  
    int columns = rs.getMetaData().getColumnCount();    
    row = new Object[columns];

    for (int i=1; i<=columns; i++) {
        row[i - 1] = rs.getObject(i);
    }

    //TODO: Set color of row according to data in "ColumnA" of previous row
    ((DefaultTableModel) myTable.getModel()).insertRow(rs.getRow()-1,row); //Add new row with the ResultSet's content
    //Get String data of ColumnA for this specific row with e.g. "(String) row[0]"
}

rs.close();
stat.close();

From what I've found so far, I have to use a custom TableModel instead of the DefaultTableModel I set in the beginning but how do I use it? Everything I've found uses fixed checks, e.g.

if content in the cell is 'buy', set the background color to 'green'

(e.g. here or here) but in my case I don't know anything about the content when the table is created because it's filled/rows are added at runtime.

I also found this answer but the author of the question reads the data, then changes the model and only then fills the table, while I fill the table row by row (directly after reading the row's content).

My question: I know how to compare the content of a cell to content of the cell in the previous row but how do I set the background color of the row at runtime?

Edit:

Here's some MRE code for filling the table. Please note: If you post a suggestion about how to accomplish what I want to do, keep in mind that I'm working with a database and a ResultSet (see code above), not pre-defined data (see code below)!

JTable myTable = new JTable();
myTable.setSelectionModel(new ToggleListSelectionModel()); //custom selection model
myTable.setModel(new DefaultTableModel(
    new Object[][] {
        {"1000", 123},
        {"1000", 234}, 
        {"1001", 123},
        {"1002", 123},
        {"1002", 234},
        {"1002", 345},
        {"1003", 123},
        {"1003", 234}
    },
    new String[] {
        "ColumnA", "ColumnB"
    }
));

Result:

enter image description here

Desired result (grey background for every new "Column A" value):

enter image description here

Alternative result (alternate marking all rows of a group):

enter image description here

12
  • (1-) keep in mind that I'm working with a database and a ResultSet (see code above), not pre-defined data (see code below)! - where the data comes from is completely irrelevant. A renderer works on the data in the TableModel.
    – camickr
    Sep 19 '19 at 14:08
  • Setting the data directly changes how the table is set up in code. Not using the right code for the setup you're using means that you won't see the result because there will simply be no rows the background of which can be changed (if the code even compiles). So unless you want an empty table without data but with rows/columns that you set in Eclipse's WindowBuilder, to write working code it is important to know how the table is filled with data.
    – Neph
    Sep 19 '19 at 14:55
  • To test how a renderer works it is irrelevant how the data gets added to the TableModel of the JTable. The data can come from a database, a file, be hardcoded or you can write a method to add the data dynamically using the addRow(...) method to simulate adding data from a database. It just doesn't matter. All you need is a JTable with a TableModel that contains data and the custom renderer. It is that simple.
    – camickr
    Sep 19 '19 at 15:05
  • I don't want to test rendering, I want to get it to work and use it. On one hand you want full code (which includes filling the table with data) to test it yourself, on the other you don't want full code but would rather ignore where the data comes from. Pick one.
    – Neph
    Sep 19 '19 at 15:34
  • In case you care, you still have several issues with the apparent solution you are using: 1) Your table has String and Integer data, but you are rendering the Integers as Strings, Typically the Integers should be displayed right justified in the column. This is solved by overriding the getColujmnClass(...) method of the JTable or TableModel. But now you will have rendering problems because you only provide a custom renderer for the String data. 2) By default the columns of a JTable can be reorder by the user which will cause rendering problems.
    – camickr
    Sep 20 '19 at 4:04
2
table.setDefaultRenderer(Object.class, new DefaultTableCellRenderer() {
    @Override
    public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table,
                                  Object value,
                                  boolean isSelected,
                                  boolean hasFocus,
                                  int row,
                                  int column) {
        Component comp = super.getTableCellRendererComponent(table,
                value, isSelected, hasFocus, row, column);
        if(!isSelected) { //Important check, see comment below!
            boolean levelBreak = row == 0;
            if (!levelBreak) {
                Object prior = table.getValueAt(row - 1, 0);
                Object current = table.getValueAt(row, 0);
                levelBreak = !prior.equals(current);
            }
            comp.setBackground(levelBreak ? Color.BLUE : Color.WHITE);
        }
        return comp;
    }
});

As the renderer / renderer component is reused for all table cells, the background must be set for all cases.

In general the JTable's TabelModel is better for getting a value instead of JTable's getValueAt, but evidently you neither sort the rows nor rearrange the columns.


For a possible older installed renderer

class MyCellRenderer extends DefaultTableCellRenderer {

    private final TableCellRenderer old;

    MyCellRenderer(TableCellRenderer old) {
        this.old = old;
    }

    @Override
    public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table,
                                  Object value,
                                  boolean isSelected,
                                  boolean hasFocus,
                                  int row,
                                  int column) {
        boolean levelBreak = row == 0;
        if (!levelBreak) {
            Object prior = table.getValueAt(row - 1, 0);
            Object current = table.getValueAt(row, 0);
            levelBreak = !prior.equals(current);
        }
        Component comp;
        if (old != null) {
            comp = old.getTableCellRendererComponent(table,
                value, isSelected, hasFocus, row, column);
        } else {
            comp = super.getTableCellRendererComponent(table,
                value, isSelected, hasFocus, row, column);
        }
        comp.setBackground(levelBreak ? Color.BLUE : Color.WHITE);
        return comp;
    }
}

table.setDefaultRenderer(Object.class, new MyCellRenderer(table.getDefaultRenderer(Object.class));
10
  • Thanks, this worked! You got 2 small mistakes though: Color.TEAL doesn't exist in "normal" Java and the comma (Color.TEAL, Color.WHITE) should be a colon. ;) JTable's TabelModel is better for getting a value instead of JTable's getValueAt - is it a performance thing or what's the difference?
    – Neph
    Sep 18 '19 at 15:28
  • I just noticed that this messes with the SelectionModel: I have it set to a custom "multi-select" (only full rows) but after adding your code, I can only select single cells, which also only adds a border instead of changing the color as usual.
    – Neph
    Sep 18 '19 at 15:35
  • There exist JTable.convertRowIndexToModel and ~ToView. I am since some time more concentrated on JavaFX/OpenJFX so the exact details I would have to read again.
    – Joop Eggen
    Sep 18 '19 at 15:35
  • Maybe there already is a custom cell renderer added. You could get the renderer and wrap it in your renderer.
    – Joop Eggen
    Sep 18 '19 at 15:38
  • 1
    I added the check to your code - only to your first one though because I didn't test it with the alternative you posted.
    – Neph
    Sep 24 '19 at 10:01
1

You need to create and use a custom TableCellRenderer

Basically, implement the one method in this class:

getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table,
                                      Object value,
                                      boolean isSelected,
                                      boolean hasFocus,
                                      int row,
                                      int column)

I think the easiest way to do this is to create a new class that extends DefaultTableCellRendererComponent, like

class myRenderer extends DefaultTableCellRendererComponent {
    public Component getTableCellRendererComponent(JTable table,
                                          Object value,
                                          boolean isSelected,
                                          boolean hasFocus,
                                          int row,
                                          int column) {
      Component c = super.getTableCellRendererComponent(...);
    }
}

Component c is a JLabel. Just call setBackground (based on the row) and you should be set

1
  • I know that I can set the color of a component but how do I apply this to my rable, so I can set the color of each row directly after I added it?
    – Neph
    Sep 18 '19 at 14:22
0

I don't know anything about the content when the table is created because it's filled/rows are added at runtime.

You don't need to know anything about the data in advance. The rendering of a JTable is only done AFTER the data has been added to the TableModel.

The Table Row Rendering suggestion you linked to in your question is the approach you should be using. It shows how to do the rendering dynamically based on the data in the model.

Everything I've found uses fixed checks, e.g. "if content in the cell is 'buy', set the background color to 'green'"

Well you also have a fixed check:

  1. You want to get the data for the current row
  2. then get the data for the previous row.
  3. Then you compare both values and do the required highlighting.

All you are doing is comparing two values. Whether one value is hard coded is retrieve from the previous row makes no difference for the comparison.

From what I've found so far, I have to use a custom TableModel instead of the DefaultTableModel

There is no reason you can't use the DefaultTableModel. In fact the code from the Table Row Rendering uses the DefualtTableModel. The model used is irrelevant. All the model does is store the data. The rendering process then uses the data from the model.

So my suggestion is to:

  1. start with the working demo code from the Table Row Rendering link.
  2. change the hardcoded data to be similar to your real data.
  3. then add you custom rendering logic

Get the basics working first. Then worry about adding the data dynamically from the database. Simplify the problem and solve one step at a time.

Simple MRE using all the suggestions from above:

import java.awt.*;
import javax.swing.*;
import javax.swing.table.*;

public class SSCCE extends JPanel
{
    public SSCCE()
    {
        JTable myTable = new JTable()
        {
            @Override
            public Class getColumnClass(int column)
            {
                return getValueAt(0, column).getClass();
            }

            @Override
            public Component prepareRenderer(TableCellRenderer renderer, int row, int column)
            {
                Component c = super.prepareRenderer(renderer, row, column);

                if (!isRowSelected(row))
                {
                    if (row == 0)
                        c.setBackground( Color.BLUE );
                    else
                    {
                        Object previous = getModel().getValueAt(row - 1, 0);
                        Object current = getModel().getValueAt(row, 0);
                        c.setBackground( current.equals(previous) ? Color.WHITE : Color.BLUE );
                    }
                }

                return c;
            }
        };

        myTable.setModel(new DefaultTableModel(
            new Object[][] {
                {"1000", 123},
                {"1000", 234},
                {"1001", 123},
                {"1002", 123},
                {"1002", 234},
                {"1002", 345},
                {"1003", 123},
                {"1003", 234}
            },
            new String[] {
                "ColumnA", "ColumnB"
            }
        ));

        setLayout( new BorderLayout() );
        add(new JScrollPane(myTable));
    }

    private static void createAndShowGUI()
    {
        JFrame frame = new JFrame("SSCCE");
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.add(new SSCCE());
        frame.pack();
//        frame.setLocationByPlatform( true );
        frame.setVisible( true );
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception
    {
        java.awt.EventQueue.invokeLater( () -> createAndShowGUI() );
/*
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                createAndShowGUI();
            }
        });
*/
    }
}
1
  • This code doesn't work if there are empty null cells. Adding a null-check for getColumnClass (return null if the value is null) and one in prepareRenderer (return null if the renderer is null) of course results in the null cells not getting the blue background color.
    – Neph
    Oct 29 '19 at 15:08

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