1

I would like to produce a pseudo-random number with the same distribution as the number of coin flips that are heads before the first tails.

0: p = 0.5
1: p = 0.25
2: p = 0.125
...

How can I produce a distribution like this efficiently? I've been trying to think of ways to do this without producing random bits for each flip. My current theory is to count the number of leading 0-bits in a uniformly distributed random number, but I have been unable to find a good reference or proof that this would be correct.

5
  • 1
    Do you have a specific programming language, hardware, or operating system in mind?
    – Peter O.
    Sep 19, 2019 at 1:53
  • LZCNT would kind of work, but it would obviously top out at the width of the integer, while actual the distribution of "number of flips until first tails" doesn't top out at anything. With 64 bits the difference is pretty small, but it's a difference. So how close does it have to be?
    – harold
    Sep 19, 2019 at 11:40
  • @PeterO. C, and a result > beyond 32 would never be required, which is why integer width would not be a problem. Sep 19, 2019 at 16:56
  • @harold O(log log n), so for all practical purposes 32 bits would be plenty. Sep 19, 2019 at 16:58
  • 1
    If you're willing to stray into c++ there is std::geometric_distribution or if you need real numbers std::exponential_distribution
    – Mgetz
    Sep 19, 2019 at 18:00

1 Answer 1

3

This is the normal desintegration decay distribution.

The problem you face is not how to determine that this is the right distribution but to produce a random generator that has this property. Normally you work taking as a base another random number generator, and try to apply a function that from that generator of know properties you get numbers distributed in the new fashion.

For your approach I've used several times the standar random generator (a flat number generator between [0..1), as source) if I apply a function to it, let's say (just a guess) the log(x) function you will get a graph approx like this:

|->    x
|->      x
|->         x
|->              x
|->                         x
|->                                                            x
+====================================================================

and it seems to match approximately the accumulation of points desired (indeed, it is the right approach)

The integral to this function (that gives you the probability of having X <= a) is given by the function represented below:

|->                                                            X
|->                         X
|->              x
|->         X     
|->      X                   
|->    X                                                        
+====================================================================
       0

and it's inverse (a logarithm function is given below, mirrored on the XY bisectrix):

|          |
|    X     |
|          |
|  X       |
|X         |
+=============
 0         1

which is -log(1-x) (but -log(x) will suffice, as x is random between 0 and 1).

double y = -A * log(unit_random());

in which A is some constant specific to produce a larger or smaller average. y will have the expected response, always the unit_random() is a flat distribution with equally probability distribution in the unit interval.

Below is a complete sample of a little program to generate points with the requested distribution. The function

#include <math.h>
#include <limits.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

#include "gr.h"

double
geometric_random(void)
{
        double n = random();

        return -log(fabs(n) / INT_MAX);
} /* geometric_random */

produces the desired random values with an average value of 1.0. To get an average of M, just multiply the values returned by it by M.

A complete example is published in github, with a montecarlo test program to test for distribution properties. To execute it, run:

$ make
$ gr -n 10000000 | mc -n 100 -b 20 >mc.out

and you'll see how the ratios of the counters for the different subintervals are constant over the whole range of values (well, not at low frequecies, as expected)

Output is:

                   n: 10000000
               sum_x: 10007209.0488715283572674
              sum_x2: 20023758.8835431151092052
               avg_x: 1.0007209048871528
              sdev_x: 1.0004667205707121
               min_x: 0.0000002696179218
               max_x: 17.2248827198513297
             below_A:      0
[0.0000000000000000, 0.2000000000000000]1811635
[0.2000000000000000, 0.4000000000000000]1484598: 0.8194796413184775
[0.4000000000000000, 0.6000000000000001]1213219: 0.8172037144061894
[0.6000000000000001, 0.8000000000000000]994937: 0.8200802987754066
[0.8000000000000000, 1.0000000000000000]813669: 0.8178095698521615
[1.0000000000000000, 1.2000000000000000]666035: 0.8185576690275775
[1.2000000000000000, 1.3999999999999999]545997: 0.8197722341918968
[1.3999999999999999, 1.5999999999999999]447841: 0.8202261184585263
[1.5999999999999999, 1.7999999999999998]365854: 0.8169283294740768
[1.7999999999999998, 1.9999999999999998]300525: 0.8214342333280489
[1.9999999999999998, 2.1999999999999997]246141: 0.8190366857998502
[2.1999999999999997, 2.3999999999999999]201303: 0.8178361183224250
[2.3999999999999999, 2.6000000000000001]164134: 0.8153579430013462
[2.6000000000000001, 2.8000000000000003]134768: 0.8210852108642938
[2.8000000000000003, 3.0000000000000004]110564: 0.8204024694289446
[3.0000000000000004, 3.2000000000000006] 90139: 0.8152653666654607
[3.2000000000000006, 3.4000000000000008] 74252: 0.8237499861325287
[3.4000000000000008, 3.6000000000000010] 60746: 0.8181059096051285
[3.6000000000000010, 3.8000000000000012] 49701: 0.8181773285483818
[3.8000000000000012, 4.0000000000000009] 40559: 0.8160600390334198
[4.0000000000000009, 4.2000000000000011] 33344: 0.8221109987918834
[4.2000000000000011, 4.4000000000000012] 27077: 0.8120501439539347
[4.4000000000000012, 4.6000000000000014] 22338: 0.8249806108505373
[4.6000000000000014, 4.8000000000000016] 18370: 0.8223654758707136
[4.8000000000000016, 5.0000000000000018] 15016: 0.8174197060424605
...

Edit:

In the case you describe, you need (for exact numbers) to build a function that describes the probability of getting less than or equal number of face coins in a toss of n, you will get a table of probabilities that will give you the exact probability to get k faces or less, when tossing n coins. This will represent something like:

|->                xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx 
|->              x
|->             x
|->             x
|->            x 
|->x x x x x x 
+=========================================================

The probabilities are calculated with the formula

P(<=k, n) = Sum[i=0, i<=k, C(n,i)*p^i*p^(n-i)]

Then you need to get the inverse of this function. This is, for different values (fractional) of the x variable you will get an exact number of coins to return from the function, this is, you will get a table like this:

r = random();
     if (r <= 0.010) return 0;
else if (r <= 0.015) return 1;
else if (r <= 0.020) return 2;
else if (r <= 0.025) return 3;
...
else if (r <= 0.090) return n-1;
else return n;

and then, you will execute an experiment (throw n coins) by selecting a random value from a flat random routine (e.g. random(3)), if the number is equal or less than the first value, you return 0, if the value is between the first table entry and the second, you return 1, ... and if the value is larger than the last entry in the table, you return n.

Of course, you will need to compile the table for the number of desired coins to toss on each experiment, then use it e.g. with a binary searching algorithm. I have not written the code of this part, but probably it will be a good exercise to you.

I apologize myself if I didn't explain very well. I showed you the desintegration decay distribution as an example of an easy to do function, but as you request in the comments for a full solution, I have edited my answer to show the steps to be done to work on your distribution (which is not the one you show in the question, as that requires that you throw the coins in a fixed order, and you have to add the probabilities of all the coins ---in any order--- that lead to the same number of head coins) The exercise is yours, but you have to work a bit on it.


EDIT2:

I have created a program to get exact binomial distribution. The program can be seen here. I'll show here only the main routine, which is where the full calculation of the table of probabilities per number of outputs, while leaving the Makefile and the auxiliary code to be downloaded from the site above.

bin_dist.c

#include <fcntl.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <getopt.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdarg.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#include "log.h"
#include "input.h"
#include "comb.h"

#define FLAG_SHOW_TABLE_ACCUM (1 << 0)
#define FLAG_SHOW_TABLE_BINOM (1 << 1)
#define FLAG_SHOW_MATCHING    (1 << 2)
#define FLAG_SHOW_HISTOGRAM   (1 << 3)
#define FLAG_SHOW_OUTPUT      (1 << 4)

#define DEF_N                    (100)
#define DEF_n                     (10)
#define DEF_p                    (0.5)
#define DEF_COLS                  (80)

unsigned N = DEF_N,
         n = DEF_n;
double   p = DEF_p;

double *prob_table = NULL;

int
main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int opt;
    int flags = 0;
    unsigned num_columns = DEF_COLS;
    while ((opt = getopt(argc, argv, "abc:dhmN:n:op:")) != EOF) {
        switch (opt) {

        case 'a': /* print table of accumulated probabilities */
            flags |= FLAG_SHOW_TABLE_ACCUM;
            break;

        case 'b': /* print table of binomial probabilities */
            flags |= FLAG_SHOW_TABLE_BINOM;
            break;

        case 'c': /* num columns of output */
            num_columns = get_unsigned(optarg, DEF_COLS,
                    "error parsing unsigned num of columns, "
                    "assuming default (%u)\n", DEF_COLS);

        case 'h': /* print histogram */
            flags |= FLAG_SHOW_HISTOGRAM;
            break;

        case 'm': /* print how number of coins is determined */
            flags |= FLAG_SHOW_MATCHING;
            break;

        case 'N': /* number of experiment repetitions */
            N = get_unsigned(optarg, DEF_N,
                    "error parsing unsigned experiment repetitions, "
                    "assuming default (%u)\n",
                    DEF_N);
            break;

        case 'n': /* number of coins to toss in each exp. */
            n = get_unsigned(optarg, DEF_n,
                    "error parsing unsigned number of coins to toss, "
                    "assuming default (%u)\n",
                    DEF_n);
            break;

        case 'o': /* dry run, don't output samples */
            flags |= FLAG_SHOW_OUTPUT;
            break;

        case 'p': /* probability of getting heads (1.0 - p) will
                   * be the probability of getting tails. */
            p = get_double(optarg, DEF_p,
                    "error parsing double probability value, "
                    "assuming default (%g)\n",
                    DEF_p); break;

        } /* switch */
    } /* while */

    /* initialize random number generator */
    unsigned short seed[3];
    static const char *const dev = "/dev/urandom";
    int fd = open(dev, O_RDONLY);
    if (fd < 0) {
        ERR(EXIT_FAILURE,
            "open: %s: %s\n",
            dev, strerror(errno));
    }
    int res = read(fd, &seed, sizeof seed);
    if (res < 0) {
        ERR(EXIT_FAILURE,
            "read: %s: %s\n",
            dev, strerror(errno));
    }
    if (res < sizeof seed) {
        ERR(EXIT_FAILURE,
            "read: %s: incomplete read\n",
            dev);
    }
    close(fd);
    seed48(seed);

    /* allocate probabilities */
    prob_table = calloc(n + 1, sizeof *prob_table);
    unsigned *histogram = calloc(n + 1, sizeof *histogram);

    double accum_prob = 0.0;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        /* probability of exactly i coins */
        double prob = comb(n, i)
                    * pow(p, i)
                    * pow(1.0 - p, n - i);
        accum_prob += prob;  /* accumulate. */
        prob_table[i] = accum_prob;

        if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_TABLE_ACCUM) {
            /* probability of P[ x <= i ] */
            printf("P[x <= %d] = %g\n", i, prob_table[i]);
        } else if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_TABLE_BINOM) {
            /* probability of P[ x == i ] */
            printf("P[x == %d] = %g\n", i, prob);
        }
    } /* for */

    unsigned most_frequent = 0;

    /* repeat N experiments: */
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        double x = drand48();
        int p;
        if (x <= prob_table[0]) {
            p = 0;
            if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_MATCHING) {
                printf("x(%lg) <= prob_table[0](%lg) --> p=0\n",
                       x, prob_table[0]);
            }
        } else if (x > prob_table[n-1]) {
            p = n;
            if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_MATCHING) {
                printf("prob_table[%d](%lg) < x(%lg) --> p=%d\n",
                       n-1, prob_table[n-1], x, p);
            }
        } else {
            /* (x > prob_table[0]) && (x <= prob_table[n-1]) */
            int l = 0, r = n-1;
            do {
                if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_MATCHING) {
                    printf("prob_table[l=%d](%lg) < x(%lg) "
                           "<= prob_table[r=%d](%lg)",
                           l, prob_table[l], x, r, prob_table[r]);
                }
                p = (l + r) >> 1;
                if (x <= prob_table[p]) {
                    r = p;
                } else { /* x > prob_table[p] */
                    l = p;
                }
                if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_MATCHING) {
                    printf(" --> l=%d, r=%d\n", l, r);
                }
            } while (l + 1 < r);
            p = r;
        }
        if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_OUTPUT) {
            printf("%d\n", p);
        }
        histogram[p]++;
        if (most_frequent < histogram[p]) {
            most_frequent = histogram[p];
        }
    } /* for */

    /* print the histogram */
    if (flags & FLAG_SHOW_HISTOGRAM) {
        for (int i = 0; i <= n; ++i) {
            if (histogram[i] > 0) {
                /* only print the values > 0 */
                printf("%4d:", i);
                size_t n = (histogram[i] * num_columns
                         + (most_frequent >> 1))
                         / most_frequent;
                for (int j = 0; j < n; ++j) {
                    fputc('#', stdout);
                }
                printf(" <%u>\n", histogram[i]);
            }
        }
    }

} /* main */

The program generates (manual page is still on the way, but you can browse the code to check the options and how to use it) a set of random numbers (with option -o) based on a set of N experiments (option -N) of tossing n (option -n) coins (or dice or whatever, with probability of success p ---option -p).

The program can be run to produce a histogram of the number of successfull outcomes in the N experiments, as follows (1000000 experiments, for a run of 20 dice, to count for the number of 6s output, which has probability of 1/6)

$ bd -N 1000000 -n 20 -p 0.1666666666667 -h
   0:######### <26232>
   1:################################### <104031>
   2:################################################################## <197588>
   3:################################################################################ <238696>
   4:#################################################################### <202369>
   5:########################################### <129569>
   6:###################### <64470>
   7:######### <25989>
   8:### <8336>
   9:# <2123>
  10: <493>
  11: <89>
  12: <15>
$ _
3
  • Great answer, however (and I apologize for not making this clearer), I am only interested in integers, ie. number of coin flips can't be fractional. Would I just round the output? Sep 22, 2019 at 23:35
  • @rtheunissen, I agree... but the number of coin flips that happen to be in one side are not following a poisson distributtion, but a binomial distribution. Anyway, probatility being fractional is a common answer, more when probability has to be a number in the range [0.0 ... 1.0] The probability of getting m faces in a toss of n coins is P(n, m) = C(n, m) p^m * (1 - p)^(n-m), where C(n, m) = n! / (m!*(n-m)!) and p being the probability of geting a face on a single coin toss (0.5 or the number you like in case of a loaded coin) Dec 5, 2022 at 6:07
  • 1
    I've edited my answer to describe more or less the solution to your problem with n coins (being n a problem parameter) Next time try to get the pattern, as you haven't shown any code or what you have worked on. Dec 5, 2022 at 6:49

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