-1

I have an Object[], My goal is to achieve Indexing. Example:

string objectPath = "RiskItems[#0].Coverages[#1].QuestionAnswer[#2]";
object[] indexes = new Object[] { 8 };
var expResult = "RiskItems[8].Coverages[1].QuestionAnswer[2]";
var result = Tokenizer.Path(objectPath, indexes);

The Path Method is:

public static string Path(string objectPath, object[] indexes)
    {
        string str = objectPath;
        if (indexes != null)
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < indexes.Length; i++)
            {
                string val = indexes[i] is int ? indexes[i].ToString() : "'" + indexes[i] + "'";
                str = str.Replace("#" + i, val);
            }
        }
        return str;
    }

From the above my expected result is not same as the result returned by the Path method. Can any one suggest me regarding the logic in Path method to achieve my goal please. Also I am restricted to use this format, So I cannot use string.format

  • 2
    You're using #1 as your token, but your array only has 1 element and is zero-based, so #1 will never be replaced, only #0 will be replaced. – Diado Sep 19 at 11:15
  • So to achieve this, an you suggest me some changes in the path method – Meena Sep 19 at 11:16
  • 1
    I think @Diado rather means you should change the ProdEffDates[#1] to ProdEffDates[#0] – Icepickle Sep 19 at 11:17
  • Well, as you have been told that the index is 1 out - how about adding 1 when you are creating the replace string. – PaulF Sep 19 at 11:18
  • 1
    how would this code handle indexes of #10 or #100? Also your edited path is 0 based, so it works as expected. Your initial question is simply using the wrong input. Is there any reason why you wouldn't simply want to use string.Format instead, where you could create string.Format("ProdEffDates[{0}]", indexes )? – Icepickle Sep 19 at 11:20
2

Based on this code in the updated question

string objectPath = "RiskItems[#0].Coverages[#1].QuestionAnswer[#2]";
object[] indexes = new Object[] { 8 };
var expResult = "RiskItems[8].Coverages[1].QuestionAnswer[2]";
var result = Tokenizer.Path(objectPath, indexes);

Your path method doesn't work correctly, because it will only change the #0 token, but it will leave #1 and #2 alone, leaving you with RiskItems[8].Coverages[#1].QuestionAnswer[#2].

So, to fix that, you should just remove the left over # characters before returning the result, namely

public static string Path(string objectPath, object[] indexes)
{
    string str = objectPath;
    if (indexes != null)
    {
        for (int i = indexes.Length; --i >= 0; )
        {
            if (indexes[i] is int intValue) {
               str = str.Replace( $"[#{i}]", $"[{intValue}]" );
               continue;
            }
            str = str.Replace( $"[#{i}]", $"['{indexes[i]}']" );
        }
    }
    // remove any left over tokens
    return str.Replace("#", "");
}

The updated code would also fix any higher indexes than #9.

You can verify this code on a dotnetfiddle

this part of the answer was for the following edit

The code you supplied does mostly what you expect it to do, it will go through your indexes and it will replace the numbers 0 to 9 which are prepended with #, however nothing above #9 will work, which is due to the replace method (see a more detailed work around below).

What you are currently not getting, is that your expected result is incorrect based on the data given. Indexes are 0 based in arrays, and you want to get index 1, so the second item. But you are only supplying 1 value.

To make your test work, you have 2 options:

  • Change the path to: string objectPath = "ProdEffDates[#0]";
  • Change your indexes to: object[] indexes = new Object[] { 0, 8 };

In both suggestions a correction is made that would handle the problem you have, at least, until you run up to having to replace and index at #10. That is because it will first replace #1 before hitting #10, which would then be replaced with whatever value was at #1.

To handle those problems, you have again a few options :)

  • Replace based on a more predictable format, like

    str = str.Replace( $"[#{i}]", $"{indexes[i]}" )
    
  • Iterate from indexes.length - 1 to 0, thus ensuring you replace the bigger numbers before the smaller numbers ;)

  • Use regex replacements

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