22

I'm wondering if there's a funciton in Java that can draw a line from the coordinates (x1, x2) to (y1, y2)?

What I want is to do something like this:

drawLine(x1, x2, x3, x4);

And I want to be able to do it at any time in the code, making several lines appear at once.

I have tried to do this:

public void paint(Graphics g){
   g.drawLine(0, 0, 100, 100);
}

But this gives me no control of when the function is used and I can't figure out how to call it several times.

Hope you understand what I mean!

P.S. I want to create a coordinate system with many coordinates.

  • Are you using AWT or Swing? There is little point to using AWT in this day & age. If coding in Swing, using a non 'top level' container such as JComponent or JPanel, override paintComponent(Graphics) method instead of paint(Graphics). – Andrew Thompson Apr 27 '11 at 10:14
  • I'm using AWT, just because that's what I first discovered... But I'll try you suggestion. Thanx – Karoline Brynildsen Apr 27 '11 at 10:16

10 Answers 10

36

A very simple example of a swing component to draw lines. It keeps internally a list with the lines that have been added with the method addLine. Each time a new line is added, repaint is invoked to inform the graphical subsytem that a new paint is required.

The class also includes some example of usage.

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import java.util.LinkedList;

import javax.swing.JButton;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;

public class LinesComponent extends JComponent{

private static class Line{
    final int x1; 
    final int y1;
    final int x2;
    final int y2;   
    final Color color;

    public Line(int x1, int y1, int x2, int y2, Color color) {
        this.x1 = x1;
        this.y1 = y1;
        this.x2 = x2;
        this.y2 = y2;
        this.color = color;
    }               
}

private final LinkedList<Line> lines = new LinkedList<Line>();

public void addLine(int x1, int x2, int x3, int x4) {
    addLine(x1, x2, x3, x4, Color.black);
}

public void addLine(int x1, int x2, int x3, int x4, Color color) {
    lines.add(new Line(x1,x2,x3,x4, color));        
    repaint();
}

public void clearLines() {
    lines.clear();
    repaint();
}

@Override
protected void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
    super.paintComponent(g);
    for (Line line : lines) {
        g.setColor(line.color);
        g.drawLine(line.x1, line.y1, line.x2, line.y2);
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    JFrame testFrame = new JFrame();
    testFrame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);
    final LinesComponent comp = new LinesComponent();
    comp.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(320, 200));
    testFrame.getContentPane().add(comp, BorderLayout.CENTER);
    JPanel buttonsPanel = new JPanel();
    JButton newLineButton = new JButton("New Line");
    JButton clearButton = new JButton("Clear");
    buttonsPanel.add(newLineButton);
    buttonsPanel.add(clearButton);
    testFrame.getContentPane().add(buttonsPanel, BorderLayout.SOUTH);
    newLineButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            int x1 = (int) (Math.random()*320);
            int x2 = (int) (Math.random()*320);
            int y1 = (int) (Math.random()*200);
            int y2 = (int) (Math.random()*200);
            Color randomColor = new Color((float)Math.random(), (float)Math.random(), (float)Math.random());
            comp.addLine(x1, y1, x2, y2, randomColor);
        }
    });
    clearButton.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
            comp.clearLines();
        }
    });
    testFrame.pack();
    testFrame.setVisible(true);
}

}
  • 1
    @Karoline: I agree with your decision to mark this post 'correct'. It was the first post that used Swing, made good use of OO (the Line class) and showed how to add lines on button click as well as remove them. @jassuncao: One question though. Was there any specific reason for using a LinkedList over the (seemingly 'lighter') ArrayList? – Andrew Thompson Apr 27 '11 at 11:43
  • 1
    In this case we don't need the advantage of fast indexing present in ArrayList. Adding new lines is a constant and fast operation, something not guaranteed for ArrayList with lots of elements. But the main reason is I'm used to linked lists for computer graphics. It was what I used most when developing 3D engines in C in my youth. – jassuncao Apr 27 '11 at 13:50
  • What imports? I'm am not getting this to work. – Karl Morrison Mar 13 '13 at 18:53
  • import java.awt.*; import java.awt.event.*; import java.util.LinkedList; import javax.swing.*; – jassuncao Mar 14 '13 at 16:29
9

Store the lines in some type of list. When it comes time to paint them, iterate the list and draw each one. Like this:

DrawLines

import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.geom.Line2D;

import javax.swing.JOptionPane;
import javax.swing.JComponent;
import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Random;

class DrawLines {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Runnable r = new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                LineComponent lineComponent = new LineComponent(400,400);
                for (int ii=0; ii<30; ii++) {
                    lineComponent.addLine();
                }
                JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, lineComponent);
            }
        };
        SwingUtilities.invokeLater(r);
    }
}

class LineComponent extends JComponent {

    ArrayList<Line2D.Double> lines;
    Random random;

    LineComponent(int width, int height) {
        super();
        setPreferredSize(new Dimension(width,height));
        lines = new ArrayList<Line2D.Double>();
        random = new Random();
    }

    public void addLine() {
        int width = (int)getPreferredSize().getWidth();
        int height = (int)getPreferredSize().getHeight();
        Line2D.Double line = new Line2D.Double(
            random.nextInt(width),
            random.nextInt(height),
            random.nextInt(width),
            random.nextInt(height)
            );
        lines.add(line);
        repaint();
    }

    public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
        g.setColor(Color.white);
        g.fillRect(0, 0, getWidth(), getHeight());
        Dimension d = getPreferredSize();
        g.setColor(Color.black);
        for (Line2D.Double line : lines) {
            g.drawLine(
                (int)line.getX1(),
                (int)line.getY1(),
                (int)line.getX2(),
                (int)line.getY2()
                );
        }
    }
}

Screenshot

enter image description here

3

You need to create a class that extends Component. There you can override the paint method and put your painting code in:

package blah.whatever;

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.Graphics;

public class TestAWT extends Component {

/** @see java.awt.Component#paint(java.awt.Graphics) */
@Override
public void paint(Graphics g) {
    super.paint(g);
    g.drawLine(0,0,100,100);
    g.drawLine(10, 10, 20, 300);
    // more drawing code here...
}

}

Put this component into the GUI of your application. If you're using Swing, you need to extend JComponent and override paintComponent, instead.

As Helios mentioned, the painting code actually tells the system how your component looks like. The system will ask for this information (call your painting code) when it thinks it needs to be (re)painted, for example, if a window is moved in front of your component.

1

In your class you should have:

public void paint(Graphics g){
   g.drawLine(x1, y1, x2, y2);
}

Then in code if there is needed you will change x1, y1, x2, y2 and call repaint();.

  • This only allows me to show one graph at a time. – Karoline Brynildsen Apr 27 '11 at 9:35
  • @Karoline: to show multiple graphs, just iterate over them and draw them all – Joeri Hendrickx Apr 27 '11 at 10:04
1

I understand you are using Java AWT API for drawing. The paint method is invoked when the control needs repainting. And I'm pretty sure it provides in the Graphics argument what rectangle is the one who needs repainting (to avoid redrawing all).

So if you are presenting a fixed image you just draw whatever you need in that method.

If you are animating I assume you can invalidate some region and the paint method will be invoked automagically. So you can modify state, call invalidate, and it will be called again.

  • +1 for explaining invalid regions. Important concept to understand when doing this. – Joeri Hendrickx Apr 27 '11 at 10:03
1

To give you some idea:

public void paint(Graphics g) {
   drawCoordinates(g);
}

private void drawCoordinates(Graphics g) {

  // get width & height here (w,h)

  // define grid width (dh, dv)

  for (int x = 0; i < w; i += dh) {
    g.drawLine(x, 0, x, h);
  }
  for (int y = 0; j < h; j += dv) {
      g.drawLine(0, y, w, y);
  }
}
  • I would like to ask whether it is possible to draw a line using double variables instead of integers. If yes how? – Matthew Jun 22 '12 at 22:39
  • 1
    You can't. There's no such thing as pixel 3.4, for example. – CodeGuy Mar 7 '13 at 16:50
0

You can use the getGraphics method of the component on which you would like to draw. This in turn should allow you to draw lines and make other things which are available through the Graphics class

  • I only get a null pointer exeption for the getGraphics method :( – Karoline Brynildsen Apr 27 '11 at 9:41
  • From which class do you call getGraphics? – nokul Apr 27 '11 at 10:04
  • "You can use the getGraphics method of the component" Sure you can, but it is foolish to do so. Java painting should be done when requested, in the paint() or paintComponent() method. – Andrew Thompson Apr 27 '11 at 10:51
0

I built a whole class of methods to draw points, lines, rectangles, circles, etc. I designed it to treat the window as a piece of graph paper where the origin doesn't have to be at the top left and the y values increase as you go up. Here's how I draw lines:

public static void drawLine (double x1, double y1, double x2, double y2)
{       
    ((Graphics2D)g).draw(new Line2D.Double(x0+x1*scale, y0-y1*scale, x0+x2*scale, y0-y2*scale));
}

In the example above, (x0, y0) represents the origin in screen coordinates and scale is a scaling factor. The input parameters are to be supplied as graph coordinates, not screen coordinates. There is no repaint() being called. You can save that til you've drawn all the lines you need.

It occurs to me that someone might not want to think in terms of graph paper:

    ((Graphics2D)g).draw(new Line2D.Double(x1, y1, x2, y2));

Notice the use of Graphics2D. This allows us to draw a Line2D object using doubles instead of ints. Besides other shapes, my class has support for 3D perspective drawing and several convenience methods (like drawing a circle centered at a certain point given a radius.) If anyone is interested, I would be happy to share more of this class.

0
a simple line , after that you can see also a doted line 

import java.awt.*;

import javax.swing.*;

import java.awt.Graphics.*;

import java.awt.Graphics2D.*;

import javax.swing.JFrame;

import javax.swing.JPanel;

import java.awt.BasicStroke;

import java.awt.Event.*;

import java.awt.Component.*;

import javax.swing.SwingUtilities;


/**
 *
 * @author junaid
 */
public class JunaidLine extends JPanel{


//private Graphics Graphics;

private void doDrawing(Graphics g){

Graphics2D g2d=(Graphics2D) g;

float[] dash1 = {2f,0f,2f};

g2d.drawLine(20, 40, 250, 40);

BasicStroke bs1 = new BasicStroke(1,BasicStroke.CAP_BUTT,

                    BasicStroke.JOIN_ROUND,1.0f,dash1,2f);

g2d.setStroke(bs1);

g2d.drawLine(20, 80, 250, 80);

    }

@Override

public void paintComponent(Graphics g){

super.paintComponent( g);

doDrawing(g);

}


}

class BasicStrokes extends JFrame{

public  BasicStrokes(){

initUI();

}

private void initUI(){

setTitle("line");

setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.DISPOSE_ON_CLOSE);

add(new JunaidLine());

setSize(280,270);

setLocationRelativeTo(null);

}

/**

* @param args the command line arguments

*/

public static void main(String[] args) {


SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable(){   

@Override

public void run(){

BasicStrokes bs = new BasicStrokes();

bs.setVisible(true);

}                

});

}


}
0

To answer your original question, it's (x1, y1) to (x2, y2).

For example,

This is to draw a horizontal line:

g.drawLine( 10, 30, 90, 30 );

vs

This is to draw a vertical line:

g.drawLine( 10, 30, 10, 90 );

I hope it helps.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.