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There is long double type for 80bit floating point, x87 extantion has instructions to work with this data type.

I know that there is __float128 and basic operations with this type is emulated by compiler. But there is no need to emulate 80bit floating point operations. What is the purpose of __float80 then?

I guess that there are some architectures that has no 80bit floating point data type, so __float80 is like crossplatform type. If CPU able to work with 80bit fp then long double means same as __float80. If not then long double doesnt exist or refers to something else and compiler emulates 80bit fp operations so only __float80 can be used to represent 80bit floationg point.

Am i right? Can u show me some examples?

  • You should not, in general, create function, variable, tag or macro names that start with an underscore. Part of C11 §7.1.3 Reserved identifiers says: — All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name spaces. See also What does double underscore (__const) mean in C? – Jonathan Leffler Sep 19 at 23:50
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The double underscore indicates that the identifier is reserved for use by the implementation of C.

C11 standard 7.1.3: Reserved Identifiers

  • All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.
  • All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name spaces.

Basically, it's a name-space reserved to avoid conflicts with identifiers created for general use. The implementation can make sure it doesn't clobber its own identifiers, and as long as your program doesn't make use of the reserved identifier-space starting with double underscores (or underscore followed by capital letter) there will be no conflicts.

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No, __ doesn't mean emulated, it means not one of the types from the ISO C standard. Implementations don't want to pollute the global namespace with names like float80 so they use names like __float80 and __int128, because ISO C reserves double-underscore names for use by the implementation.

I'd guess that __float80 gives you access to 80-bit float even when compiling for the MS Windows ABI where long double is the same format as double. (IEEE binary64).

You can think of __float80 and __float128 as an implementation-specific equivalents to int64_t instead of long or long long. On platforms that have native 80-bit FP, __float80 doesn't need to be emulated.

On other targets, __float80 might not be supported at all.

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