205

I have a little "floating tool box" - a div with position:fixed; overflow:auto. Works just fine.

But when scrolling inside that box (with the mouse wheel) and reaching the bottom OR top, the parent element "takes over" the "scroll request" : The document behind the tool box scrolls.
- Which is annoying and not what the user "asked for".

I'm using jQuery and thought I could stop this behaviour with event.stoppropagation():
$("#toolBox").scroll( function(event){ event.stoppropagation() });

It does enter the function, but still, propagation happens anyway (the document scrolls)
- It's surprisingly hard to search for this topic on SO (and Google), so I have to ask:
How to prevent propagation / bubbling of the scroll-event ?

Edit:
Working solution thanks to amustill (and Brandon Aaron for the mousewheel-plugin here:
https://github.com/brandonaaron/jquery-mousewheel/raw/master/jquery.mousewheel.js

$(".ToolPage").bind('mousewheel', function(e, d)  
    var t = $(this);
    if (d > 0 && t.scrollTop() === 0) {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
    else {
        if (d < 0 && (t.scrollTop() == t.get(0).scrollHeight - t.innerHeight())) {
            e.preventDefault();
        }
    }
});
  • 1
    Looks like it might not be possible. stackoverflow.com/questions/1459676/… – musaul Apr 27 '11 at 10:35
  • 4
    @Musaul - actually that thread gave 2 possible solutions (if a bit rouge): setting overflow:hidden on the document, when hovering in the toolbox, or saving the documents scrollTop, and forcing it upon the document repeatedly (nice), during toolbox.scroll()... – T4NK3R Apr 27 '11 at 10:55
  • 1
    Yeah, I meant the scroll event bubbling. But I suppose it gives you workarounds. I'd completely avoid the scroll forcing option though. Doing too much (or anything in complex pages) in the scroll event can make the browser freeze for a while, especially on slower computers. – musaul Apr 27 '11 at 11:46
  • This works beautifully in everything other than IE, when attached to the body tag. With the above fix, it seems to disable mousewheel scrolling entirely. – Matthew Mar 28 '12 at 22:08
  • Please take a look at my answer, @Matthew. It resolves the IE issue, as well as normalizing for FireFox without any plug-ins. – Troy Alford Jun 13 '13 at 19:57

30 Answers 30

44

It's possible with the use of Brandon Aaron's Mousewheel plugin.

Here's a demo: http://jsbin.com/jivutakama/edit?html,js,output

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    There's also some weirdness if you have scrolling inertia on and scroll a child container and then move your mouse out of the child. The inertia caries onto the parent or any other container. I experienced this on a magic mouse in chrome on OSX Lion – Jethro Larson Aug 8 '12 at 1:20
  • 5
    the jsbin examples do not prevent page scrolling on an iPad. – Heraldmonkey Jan 23 '13 at 8:49
  • 2
    @Heraldmonkey I'm aware of this issue. I hope to have time to revise the answer for all browsers and device. – amustill Jan 23 '13 at 10:34
  • 2
    The jsbin example is not working for me on an osx trackpad – kevzettler Aug 8 '13 at 18:55
  • 20
    Not working for me on Mac OS X and Chrome 32. – Mitar Jan 27 '14 at 4:00
171

I am adding this answer for completeness because the accepted answer by @amustill does not correctly solve the problem in Internet Explorer. Please see the comments in my original post for details. In addition, this solution does not require any plugins - only jQuery.

In essence, the code works by handling the mousewheel event. Each such event contains a wheelDelta equal to the number of px which it is going to move the scrollable area to. If this value is >0, then we are scrolling up. If the wheelDelta is <0 then we are scrolling down.

FireFox: FireFox uses DOMMouseScroll as the event, and populates originalEvent.detail, whose +/- is reversed from what is described above. It generally returns intervals of 3, while other browsers return scrolling in intervals of 120 (at least on my machine). To correct, we simply detect it and multiply by -40 to normalize.

@amustill's answer works by canceling the event if the <div>'s scrollable area is already either at the top or the bottom maximum position. However, Internet Explorer disregards the canceled event in situations where the delta is larger than the remaining scrollable space.

In other words, if you have a 200px tall <div> containing 500px of scrollable content, and the current scrollTop is 400, a mousewheel event which tells the browser to scroll 120px further will result in both the <div> and the <body> scrolling, because 400 + 120 > 500.

So - to solve the problem, we have to do something slightly different, as shown below:

The requisite jQuery code is:

$(document).on('DOMMouseScroll mousewheel', '.Scrollable', function(ev) {
    var $this = $(this),
        scrollTop = this.scrollTop,
        scrollHeight = this.scrollHeight,
        height = $this.innerHeight(),
        delta = (ev.type == 'DOMMouseScroll' ?
            ev.originalEvent.detail * -40 :
            ev.originalEvent.wheelDelta),
        up = delta > 0;

    var prevent = function() {
        ev.stopPropagation();
        ev.preventDefault();
        ev.returnValue = false;
        return false;
    }

    if (!up && -delta > scrollHeight - height - scrollTop) {
        // Scrolling down, but this will take us past the bottom.
        $this.scrollTop(scrollHeight);
        return prevent();
    } else if (up && delta > scrollTop) {
        // Scrolling up, but this will take us past the top.
        $this.scrollTop(0);
        return prevent();
    }
});

In essence, this code cancels any scrolling event which would create the unwanted edge condition, then uses jQuery to set the scrollTop of the <div> to either the maximum or minimum value, depending on which direction the mousewheel event was requesting.

Because the event is canceled entirely in either case, it never propagates to the body at all, and therefore solves the issue in IE, as well as all of the other browsers.

I have also put up a working example on jsFiddle.

| improve this answer | |
  • 13
    This is, by far, the most comprehensive answer. I made your function into a jQuery extension, so it can be used inline in a jQuery object chain. See this Gist. – theftprevention Jul 9 '13 at 17:40
  • 2
    Excellent, comprehensive and easy to understand answer. – David Tuite Oct 21 '13 at 11:57
  • 2
    This works very well, but there seems to be an inertia problem when scrolling really fast. The page is still scrolled by about 20 pixels, which is not too bad. – juminoz Dec 20 '13 at 22:00
  • 5
    Don't lock scrolling if the content doesn't overflow: if (this.scrollHeight <= parseInt($(this).css("max-height"))) return as the first line in the function. – T4NK3R Jul 25 '14 at 9:34
  • 2
    This worked great for me with a minor change. I found that setting the element's height to $this.height() wasn't responding properly to the bottom of an element if it had paddings/margins. So I changed it to $this.outerHeight(true). – Joseph Coco Sep 8 '14 at 22:28
31

All the solutions given in this thread don't mention an existing - and native - way to solve this problem without reordering DOM and/or using event preventing tricks. But there's a good reason: this way is proprietary - and available on MS web platform only. Quoting MSDN:

-ms-scroll-chaining property - specifies the scrolling behavior that occurs when a user hits the scroll limit during a manipulation. Property values:

chained - Initial value. The nearest scrollable parent element begins scrolling when the user hits a scroll limit during a manipulation. No bounce effect is shown.

none - A bounce effect is shown when the user hits a scroll limit during a manipulation.

Granted, this property is supported on IE10+/Edge only. Still, here's a telling quote:

To give you a sense of how popular preventing scroll chaining may be, according to my quick http-archive search "-ms-scroll-chaining: none" is used in 0.4% of top 300K pages despite being limited in functionality and only supported on IE/Edge.

And now good news, everyone! Starting from Chrome 63, we finally have a native cure for Blink-based platforms too - and that's both Chrome (obviously) and Android WebView (soon).

Quoting the introducing article:

The overscroll-behavior property is a new CSS feature that controls the behavior of what happens when you over-scroll a container (including the page itself). You can use it to cancel scroll chaining, disable/customize the pull-to-refresh action, disable rubberbanding effects on iOS (when Safari implements overscroll-behavior), and more.[...]

The property takes three possible values:

auto - Default. Scrolls that originate on the element may propagate to ancestor elements.

contain - prevents scroll chaining. Scrolls do not propagate to ancestors but local effects within the node are shown. For example, the overscroll glow effect on Android or the rubberbanding effect on iOS which notifies the user when they've hit a scroll boundary. Note: using overscroll-behavior: contain on the html element prevents overscroll navigation actions.

none - same as contain but it also prevents overscroll effects within the node itself (e.g. Android overscroll glow or iOS rubberbanding).

[...] The best part is that using overscroll-behavior does not adversely affect page performance like the hacks mentioned in the intro!

Here's this feature in action. And here's corresponding CSS Module document.

UPDATE: Firefox, since version 59, has joined the club, and MS Edge is expected to implement this feature in version 18. Here's the corresponding caniusage.

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    THANK YOU thats great news – T4NK3R Jan 27 '18 at 1:25
  • 3
    caniuse.com/#search=overscroll-behavior I guess it will get better in the future – davideghz Dec 19 '18 at 13:39
  • 4
    Safari doesn't support overscroll-behavior. – ShortFuse Jan 30 '19 at 20:07
  • This strategy doesn’t seem to be effective on an inner element that doesn’t itself have enough content to be scrollable. – Anders Kaseorg Mar 8 '19 at 1:05
23

I know it's quite an old question, but since this is one of top results in google... I had to somehow cancel scroll bubbling without jQuery and this code works for me:

function preventDefault(e) {
  e = e || window.event;
  if (e.preventDefault)
    e.preventDefault();
  e.returnValue = false;  
}

document.getElementById('a').onmousewheel = function(e) { 
  document.getElementById('a').scrollTop -= e. wheelDeltaY; 
  preventDefault(e);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    interesting idea, ..the mousewheel event is not cross-browser though, and the scroll distance needs to be normalised, see stackoverflow.com/a/5542105/126600 – zack Jul 25 '12 at 16:53
  • We can have nested views, which makes it buggy. – jiyinyiyong Sep 18 '14 at 10:27
  • Does this work with mobile touch? Thanks – AGamePlayer Jul 3 '18 at 15:47
  • @AGamePlayer definitelly not, because touch devices won't be firing mousewheel events unless you'd actually be using a mouse on them. Otherwise they do the normal scrolling. You might be lucky (ab)using touch events though... – Robert Koritnik Nov 27 '18 at 11:48
19

EDIT: CodePen example

For AngularJS, I defined the following directive:

module.directive('isolateScrolling', function () {
  return {
    restrict: 'A',
      link: function (scope, element, attr) {
        element.bind('DOMMouseScroll', function (e) {
          if (e.detail > 0 && this.clientHeight + this.scrollTop == this.scrollHeight) {
            this.scrollTop = this.scrollHeight - this.clientHeight;
            e.stopPropagation();
            e.preventDefault();
            return false;
          }
          else if (e.detail < 0 && this.scrollTop <= 0) {
            this.scrollTop = 0;
            e.stopPropagation();
            e.preventDefault();
            return false;
          }
        });
        element.bind('mousewheel', function (e) {
          if (e.deltaY > 0 && this.clientHeight + this.scrollTop >= this.scrollHeight) {
            this.scrollTop = this.scrollHeight - this.clientHeight;
            e.stopPropagation();
            e.preventDefault();
            return false;
          }
          else if (e.deltaY < 0 && this.scrollTop <= 0) {
            this.scrollTop = 0;
            e.stopPropagation();
            e.preventDefault();
            return false;
          }

          return true;
        });
      }
  };
});

And then added it to the scrollable element (the dropdown-menu ul):

<div class="dropdown">
  <button type="button" class="btn dropdown-toggle">Rename <span class="caret"></span></button>
  <ul class="dropdown-menu" isolate-scrolling>
    <li ng-repeat="s in savedSettings | objectToArray | orderBy:'name' track by s.name">
      <a ng-click="renameSettings(s.name)">{{s.name}}</a>
    </li>
  </ul>
</div>

Tested on Chrome and Firefox. Chrome's smooth scrolling defeats this hack when a large mousewheel movement is made near (but not at) the top or bottom of the scroll region.

| improve this answer | |
  • This does not appear to be working in Chrome 34. The binding is firing, but the page continues to scroll when the <ul> reaches the bottom. – Evil Closet Monkey May 20 '14 at 17:01
  • It's working for me in Chrome 36. – dOxxx Jun 8 '14 at 0:35
  • Doesn't work on Firefox or IE though, and neither it does after you add DOMMouseScroll. – Zequez Sep 2 '14 at 16:36
  • it works for me, but the values are inverted ;) Just change > 0 with < 0 and vice versa. Tested on Windows 8.1, with chrome, firefox and ie11 – andrea.spot. Apr 14 '15 at 8:28
  • 1
    working, only difference I use is change e.deltaY for e.originalEvent.deltaY not sure why... why you use differents binds instead a single function? worked for me... tested on FF chrome safari – ppollono Jan 28 '16 at 14:38
13

There are tons of questions like this out there, with many answers, but I could not find a satisfactory solution that did not involve events, scripts, plugins, etc. I wanted to keep it straight in HTML and CSS. I finally found a solution that worked, although it involved restructuring the markup to break the event chain.


1. Basic problem

Scrolling input (i.e.: mousewheel) applied to the modal element will spill over into an ancestor element and scroll it in the same direction, if some such element is scrollable:

(All examples are meant to be viewed on desktop resolutions)

https://jsfiddle.net/ybkbg26c/5/

HTML:

<div id="parent">
  <div id="modal">
    This text is pretty long here.  Hope fully, we will get some scroll bars.
  </div>
</div>

CSS:

#modal {
  position: absolute;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  top: 20%;
  left: 20%;
  overflow-y: scroll;
}
#parent {
  height: 4000px;
}

2. No parent scroll on modal scroll

The reason why the ancestor ends up scrolling is because the scroll event bubbles and some element on the chain is able to handle it. A way to stop that is to make sure none of the elements on the chain know how to handle the scroll. In terms of our example, we can refactor the tree to move the modal out of the parent element. For obscure reasons, it is not enough to keep the parent and the modal DOM siblings; the parent must be wrapped by another element that establishes a new stacking context. An absolutely positioned wrapper around the parent can do the trick.

The result we get is that as long as the modal receives the scroll event, the event will not bubble to the "parent" element.

It should typically be possible to redesign the DOM tree to support this behavior without affecting what the end user sees.

https://jsfiddle.net/0bqq31Lv/3/

HTML:

<div id="context">
  <div id="parent">
  </div>
</div>
<div id="modal">
  This text is pretty long here.  Hope fully, we will get some scroll bars.
</div>

CSS (new only):

#context {
  position: absolute;
  overflow-y: scroll;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}

3. No scroll anywhere except in modal while it is up

The solution above still allows the parent to receive scroll events, as long as they are not intercepted by the modal window (i.e. if triggered by mousewheel while the cursor is not over the modal). This is sometimes undesirable and we may want to forbid all background scrolling while the modal is up. To do that, we need to insert an extra stacking context that spans the whole viewport behind the modal. We can do that by displaying an absolutely positioned overlay, which can be fully transparent if necessary (but not visibility:hidden).

https://jsfiddle.net/0bqq31Lv/2/

HTML:

<div id="context">
  <div id="parent">
  </div>
</div>
<div id="overlay">  
</div>
<div id="modal">
  This text is pretty long here.  Hope fully, we will get some scroll bars.
</div>

CSS (new on top of #2):

#overlay {
  background-color: transparent;
  position: absolute;
  top: 0;
  bottom: 0;
  left: 0;
  right: 0;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • The basic problem arises when the "modal" IS the child of another scrollable element - scripting seems unavoidable.. In my original code the toolbox was just one of several - each in a separate tab (COULD probably be moved to <body> - but that would be BIG) – T4NK3R Jan 5 '16 at 10:27
  • 2
    @T4NK3R Yes, there are tradeoffs. In my case refactoring the DOM was by far preferable to throwing UI javascript onto the problem. Overall, I think this is an option worth contemplating for someone who designs their tree from scratch. – Daniel S. Jan 6 '16 at 4:08
  • This is the only approach that effectively avoids the issue instead of trying to fix a problem with tons of JS that could have been avoided from the start. – andreszs Oct 2 '17 at 12:28
  • 1
    I've read dozens of answers to this issue, many of them with 100+ points. This is the only one that actually makes sense. – Daniel Bastos Nov 6 '17 at 20:24
9

As variant, to avoid performance issues with scroll or mousewheel handling, you can use code like below:

css:

body.noscroll {
    overflow: hidden;
}
.scrollable {
    max-height: 200px;
    overflow-y: scroll;
    border: 1px solid #ccc;
}

html:

<div class="scrollable">
...A bunch of items to make the div scroll...
</div>
...A bunch of text to make the body scroll...

js:

var $document = $(document),
    $body = $('body'),
    $scrolable = $('.scrollable');

$scrolable.on({
          'mouseenter': function () {
            // add hack class to prevent workspace scroll when scroll outside
            $body.addClass('noscroll');
          },
          'mouseleave': function () {
            // remove hack class to allow scroll
            $body.removeClass('noscroll');
          }
        });

Example of work: http://jsbin.com/damuwinarata/4

| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    The scrolls when is hide in some browsers move all the page to left because scroll disappear... – Aral Roca Oct 8 '15 at 14:34
9

Here's a plain JavaScript version:

function scroll(e) {
  var delta = (e.type === "mousewheel") ? e.wheelDelta : e.detail * -40;
  if (delta < 0 && (this.scrollHeight - this.offsetHeight - this.scrollTop) <= 0) {
    this.scrollTop = this.scrollHeight;
    e.preventDefault();
  } else if (delta > 0 && delta > this.scrollTop) {
    this.scrollTop = 0;
    e.preventDefault();
  }
}
document.querySelectorAll(".scroller").addEventListener("mousewheel", scroll);
document.querySelectorAll(".scroller").addEventListener("DOMMouseScroll", scroll);
| improve this answer | |
  • Nice solution. Works great in chrome – saike Apr 16 '16 at 7:17
  • I was having issue with firefox, this solution worked. – Suhail AKhtar Apr 1 '19 at 10:14
9

Angular JS Directive

I had to wrap an angular directive. The following is a Mashup of the other answers here. tested on Chrome and Internet Explorer 11.

var app = angular.module('myApp');

app.directive("preventParentScroll", function () {
    return {
        restrict: "A",
        scope: false,
        link: function (scope, elm, attr) {
            elm.bind('mousewheel', onMouseWheel);
            function onMouseWheel(e) {
                elm[0].scrollTop -= (e.wheelDeltaY || (e.originalEvent && (e.originalEvent.wheelDeltaY || e.originalEvent.wheelDelta)) || e.wheelDelta || 0);
                e.stopPropagation();
                e.preventDefault();
                e.returnValue = false;
            }
        }
    }
});

Usage

<div prevent-parent-scroll>
    ...
</div>

Hopes this helps the next person that gets here from a Google search.

| improve this answer | |
  • I really like the solution, it's working good. I just had to change one thing in angular 1.5. As e.originalEvet is not needed, just read wheel deltas directly from the e. (for both, wheelDeltaY and wheelDelta) – Tom Oct 6 '16 at 7:56
  • @Tom thanks for your feedback. i think e.originalEvent is for supporting IE – Jossef Harush Oct 6 '16 at 11:40
  • Hmm interesting, it sounds like IE. I will check it when I will be around win machine. – Tom Oct 6 '16 at 12:39
7

Using native element scroll properties with the delta value from the mousewheel plugin:

$elem.on('mousewheel', function (e, delta) {
    // Restricts mouse scrolling to the scrolling range of this element.
    if (
        this.scrollTop < 1 && delta > 0 ||
        (this.clientHeight + this.scrollTop) === this.scrollHeight && delta < 0
    ) {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
});
| improve this answer | |
6

In case someone is still looking for a solution for this, the following plugin does the job http://mohammadyounes.github.io/jquery-scrollLock/

It fully addresses the issue of locking mouse wheel scroll inside a given container, preventing it from propagating to parent element.

It does not change wheel scrolling speed, user experience will not be affected. and you get the same behavior regardless of the OS mouse wheel vertical scrolling speed (On Windows it can be set to one screen or one line up to 100 lines per notch).

Demo: http://mohammadyounes.github.io/jquery-scrollLock/example/

Source: https://github.com/MohammadYounes/jquery-scrollLock

| improve this answer | |
  • Sounds great, but when I try your demo in either Firefox or Chrome on MacOS, I still see the kind of problematic scrolling behavior described in this question. – Ghazgkull Jul 3 '15 at 21:36
  • @Ghazgkull Check the General section in your System Preferences, if "Show Scroll Bars" is set to "When Scrolling", then you need to force it as the library won't be able to detect the presence of scroll-bars (see github.com/MohammadYounes/jquery-scrollLock/pull/3). – MK. Jul 3 '15 at 23:31
4

amustill's answer as a knockout handler:

ko.bindingHandlers.preventParentScroll = {
    init: function (element, valueAccessor, allBindingsAccessor, context) {
        $(element).mousewheel(function (e, d) {
            var t = $(this);
            if (d > 0 && t.scrollTop() === 0) {
                e.preventDefault();
            }
            else {
                if (d < 0 && (t.scrollTop() == t.get(0).scrollHeight - t.innerHeight())) {
                    e.preventDefault();
                }
            }
        });
    }
};
| improve this answer | |
  • I'd add a call to ko.utils.domNodeDisposal.addDisposeCallback in here too. I know it's probably not necessary since the node cleanup works between KO and jQuery works pretty well but it's nice to cover your bases :) – Ian Yates Jan 22 '16 at 6:29
4

the method above is not that natural, after some googling I find a more nice solution , and no need of jQuery. see [1] and demo [2].

  var element = document.getElementById('uf-notice-ul');

  var isMacWebkit = (navigator.userAgent.indexOf("Macintosh") !== -1 &&
    navigator.userAgent.indexOf("WebKit") !== -1);
  var isFirefox = (navigator.userAgent.indexOf("firefox") !== -1);

  element.onwheel = wheelHandler; // Future browsers
  element.onmousewheel = wheelHandler; // Most current browsers
  if (isFirefox) {
    element.scrollTop = 0;
    element.addEventListener("DOMMouseScroll", wheelHandler, false);
  }
  // prevent from scrolling parrent elements
  function wheelHandler(event) {
    var e = event || window.event; // Standard or IE event object

    // Extract the amount of rotation from the event object, looking
    // for properties of a wheel event object, a mousewheel event object 
    // (in both its 2D and 1D forms), and the Firefox DOMMouseScroll event.
    // Scale the deltas so that one "click" toward the screen is 30 pixels.
    // If future browsers fire both "wheel" and "mousewheel" for the same
    // event, we'll end up double-counting it here. Hopefully, however,
    // cancelling the wheel event will prevent generation of mousewheel.
    var deltaX = e.deltaX * -30 || // wheel event
      e.wheelDeltaX / 4 || // mousewheel
      0; // property not defined
    var deltaY = e.deltaY * -30 || // wheel event
      e.wheelDeltaY / 4 || // mousewheel event in Webkit
      (e.wheelDeltaY === undefined && // if there is no 2D property then 
        e.wheelDelta / 4) || // use the 1D wheel property
      e.detail * -10 || // Firefox DOMMouseScroll event
      0; // property not defined

    // Most browsers generate one event with delta 120 per mousewheel click.
    // On Macs, however, the mousewheels seem to be velocity-sensitive and
    // the delta values are often larger multiples of 120, at 
    // least with the Apple Mouse. Use browser-testing to defeat this.
    if (isMacWebkit) {
      deltaX /= 30;
      deltaY /= 30;
    }
    e.currentTarget.scrollTop -= deltaY;
    // If we ever get a mousewheel or wheel event in (a future version of)
    // Firefox, then we don't need DOMMouseScroll anymore.
    if (isFirefox && e.type !== "DOMMouseScroll") {
      element.removeEventListener("DOMMouseScroll", wheelHandler, false);
    }
    // Don't let this event bubble. Prevent any default action.
    // This stops the browser from using the mousewheel event to scroll
    // the document. Hopefully calling preventDefault() on a wheel event
    // will also prevent the generation of a mousewheel event for the
    // same rotation.
    if (e.preventDefault) e.preventDefault();
    if (e.stopPropagation) e.stopPropagation();
    e.cancelBubble = true; // IE events
    e.returnValue = false; // IE events
    return false;
  }

[1] https://dimakuzmich.wordpress.com/2013/07/16/prevent-scrolling-of-parent-element-with-javascript/

[2] http://jsfiddle.net/dima_k/5mPkB/1/

| improve this answer | |
  • Very nice solution - and this one blocks scrolling of the parent, even if the the small container doesn't need scrolling (it's content fits inside) - though some would bark at that - maybe make that feature optional with a second class...? – T4NK3R Nov 30 '16 at 16:07
  • Ups, spoke too soon. In my Chrome on W10, scroll jumps straight to the bottom when wheeling down (on your jsfiddle) - that's no good – T4NK3R Nov 30 '16 at 16:11
4

This actually works in AngularJS. Tested on Chrome and Firefox.

.directive('stopScroll', function () {
    return {
        restrict: 'A',
        link: function (scope, element, attr) {
            element.bind('mousewheel', function (e) {
                var $this = $(this),
                    scrollTop = this.scrollTop,
                    scrollHeight = this.scrollHeight,
                    height = $this.height(),
                    delta = (e.type == 'DOMMouseScroll' ?
                    e.originalEvent.detail * -40 :
                        e.originalEvent.wheelDelta),
                    up = delta > 0;

                var prevent = function() {
                    e.stopPropagation();
                    e.preventDefault();
                    e.returnValue = false;
                    return false;
                };

                if (!up && -delta > scrollHeight - height - scrollTop) {
                    // Scrolling down, but this will take us past the bottom.
                    $this.scrollTop(scrollHeight);
                    return prevent();
                } else if (up && delta > scrollTop) {
                    // Scrolling up, but this will take us past the top.
                    $this.scrollTop(0);
                    return prevent();
                }
            });
        }
    };
})
| improve this answer | |
2

my jQuery plugin:

$('.child').dontScrollParent();

$.fn.dontScrollParent = function()
{
    this.bind('mousewheel DOMMouseScroll',function(e)
    {
        var delta = e.originalEvent.wheelDelta || -e.originalEvent.detail;

        if (delta > 0 && $(this).scrollTop() <= 0)
            return false;
        if (delta < 0 && $(this).scrollTop() >= this.scrollHeight - $(this).height())
            return false;

        return true;
    });
}
| improve this answer | |
  • This doesn't seem to work in Firefox. – Tyson Cadenhead Apr 16 '13 at 12:19
2

I have a similar situation and here's how i solved it:
All my scrollable elements get the class scrollable.

$(document).on('wheel', '.scrollable', function(evt) {
  var offsetTop = this.scrollTop + parseInt(evt.originalEvent.deltaY, 10);
  var offsetBottom = this.scrollHeight - this.getBoundingClientRect().height - offsetTop;

  if (offsetTop < 0 || offsetBottom < 0) {
    evt.preventDefault();
  } else {
    evt.stopImmediatePropagation();
  }
});

stopImmediatePropagation() makes sure not to scroll parent scrollable area from scrollable child area.

Here's a vanilla JS implementation of it: http://jsbin.com/lugim/2/edit?js,output

| improve this answer | |
  • Can you please clarify what "offsetTop < 0 || offsetBottom < 0" means? What are you actually trying to assert? – Stoutie Mar 27 '15 at 22:25
  • Consider using an intermediary variable to give it a name. – Stoutie Mar 27 '15 at 22:26
  • ... or rename the existing ones, or add some comments to explain. – Stoutie Mar 27 '15 at 22:40
  • If I understand right, you are checking if the element will be scrolled to bottom or top boundary if the event should run it's course. – Stoutie Mar 27 '15 at 23:11
2

New web dev here. This worked like a charm for me on both IE and Chrome.

static preventScrollPropagation(e: HTMLElement) {
    e.onmousewheel = (ev) => {
        var preventScroll = false;
        var isScrollingDown = ev.wheelDelta < 0;
        if (isScrollingDown) {
            var isAtBottom = e.scrollTop + e.clientHeight == e.scrollHeight;
            if (isAtBottom) {
                preventScroll = true;
            }
        } else {
            var isAtTop = e.scrollTop == 0;
            if (isAtTop) {
                preventScroll = true;
            }
        }
        if (preventScroll) {
            ev.preventDefault();
        }
    }
}

Don't let the number of lines fool you, it is quite simple - just a bit verbose for readability (self documenting code ftw right?)

Also I should mention that the language here is TypeScript, but as always, it is straightforward to convert it to JS.

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1

For those using MooTools, here is equivalent code:

            'mousewheel': function(event){
            var height = this.getSize().y;
            height -= 2;    // Not sure why I need this bodge
            if ((this.scrollTop === (this.scrollHeight - height) && event.wheel < 0) || 
                (this.scrollTop === 0 && event.wheel > 0)) {
                event.preventDefault();
            }

Bear in mind that I, like some others, had to tweak a value by a couple of px, that is what the height -= 2 is for.

Basically the main difference is that in MooTools, the delta info comes from event.wheel instead of an extra parameter passed to the event.

Also, I had problems if I bound this code to anything (event.target.scrollHeight for a bound function does not equal this.scrollHeight for a non-bound one)

Hope this helps someone as much as this post helped me ;)

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  • although i know nothing about your code, i'm willing to bet you had to subtract 2 from the height because getSize() doesn't account for the border (which in your case was 1px on both top and bottom). – Ryan Taylor Dec 2 '14 at 22:31
1

Check out Leland Kwong's code.

Basic idea is to bind the wheeling event to the child element, and then use the native javascript property scrollHeight and the jquery property outerHeight of the child element to detect the end of the scroll, upon which return false to the wheeling event to prevent any scrolling.

var scrollableDist,curScrollPos,wheelEvent,dY;
$('#child-element').on('wheel', function(e){
  scrollableDist = $(this)[0].scrollHeight - $(this).outerHeight();
  curScrollPos = $(this).scrollTop();
  wheelEvent = e.originalEvent;
  dY = wheelEvent.deltaY;
  if ((dY>0 && curScrollPos >= scrollableDist) ||
      (dY<0 && curScrollPos <= 0)) {
    return false;
  }
});
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  • Nice, keeping it "local" - but what if deltaY is "chunky" - won't the last 20-30px remain hidden then ? – T4NK3R Jan 5 '16 at 10:22
1

I yoinked this from the chosen library: https://github.com/harvesthq/chosen/blob/master/coffee/chosen.jquery.coffee

function preventParentScroll(evt) {
    var delta = evt.deltaY || -evt.wheelDelta || (evt && evt.detail)
    if (delta) {
        evt.preventDefault()
        if (evt.type ==  'DOMMouseScroll') {
            delta = delta * 40  
        }
        fakeTable.scrollTop = delta + fakeTable.scrollTop
    }
}
var el = document.getElementById('some-id')
el.addEventListener('mousewheel', preventParentScroll)
el.addEventListener('DOMMouseScroll', preventParentScroll)

This works for me.

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0

jQuery plugin with emulate natural scrolling for Internet Explorer

  $.fn.mousewheelStopPropagation = function(options) {
    options = $.extend({
        // defaults
        wheelstop: null // Function
        }, options);

    // Compatibilities
    var isMsIE = ('Microsoft Internet Explorer' === navigator.appName);
    var docElt = document.documentElement,
        mousewheelEventName = 'mousewheel';
    if('onmousewheel' in docElt) {
        mousewheelEventName = 'mousewheel';
    } else if('onwheel' in docElt) {
        mousewheelEventName = 'wheel';
    } else if('DOMMouseScroll' in docElt) {
        mousewheelEventName = 'DOMMouseScroll';
    }
    if(!mousewheelEventName) { return this; }

    function mousewheelPrevent(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
        event.stopPropagation();
        if('function' === typeof options.wheelstop) {
            options.wheelstop(event);
        }
    }

    return this.each(function() {
        var _this = this,
            $this = $(_this);
        $this.on(mousewheelEventName, function(event) {
            var origiEvent = event.originalEvent;
            var scrollTop = _this.scrollTop,
                scrollMax = _this.scrollHeight - $this.outerHeight(),
                delta = -origiEvent.wheelDelta;
            if(isNaN(delta)) {
                delta = origiEvent.deltaY;
            }
            var scrollUp = delta < 0;
            if((scrollUp && scrollTop <= 0) || (!scrollUp && scrollTop >= scrollMax)) {
                mousewheelPrevent(event);
            } else if(isMsIE) {
                // Fix Internet Explorer and emulate natural scrolling
                var animOpt = { duration:200, easing:'linear' };
                if(scrollUp && -delta > scrollTop) {
                    $this.stop(true).animate({ scrollTop:0 }, animOpt);
                    mousewheelPrevent(event);
                } else if(!scrollUp && delta > scrollMax - scrollTop) {
                    $this.stop(true).animate({ scrollTop:scrollMax }, animOpt);
                    mousewheelPrevent(event);
                }
            }
        });
    });
};

https://github.com/basselin/jquery-mousewheel-stop-propagation/blob/master/mousewheelStopPropagation.js

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  • 1
    While this link may answer the question, it is better to include the essential parts of the answer here and provide the link for reference. Link-only answers can become invalid if the linked page changes. – Radim Köhler Feb 2 '14 at 9:03
  • Great job Tiben. Thanks for that, really. +1 for the effort – Radim Köhler Feb 2 '14 at 10:52
0

The best solution I could find was listening to the scroll event on the window and set the scrollTop to the previous scrollTop if the child div was visible.

prevScrollPos = 0
$(window).scroll (ev) ->
    if $('#mydiv').is(':visible')
        document.body.scrollTop = prevScrollPos
    else
        prevScrollPos = document.body.scrollTop

There is a flicker in the background of the child div if you fire a lot of scroll events, so this could be tweaked, but it is hardly noticed and it was sufficient for my use case.

| improve this answer | |
0

Don't use overflow: hidden; on body. It automatically scrolls everything to the top. There's no need for JavaScript either. Make use of overflow: auto;:

HTML Structure

<div class="overlay">
    <div class="overlay-content"></div>
</div>

<div class="background-content">
    lengthy content here
</div>

Styling

.overlay{
    position: fixed;
    top: 0px;
    left: 0px;
    right: 0px;
    bottom: 0px;
    background-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8);

    .overlay-content {
        height: 100%;
        overflow: scroll;
    }
}

.background-content{
    height: 100%;
    overflow: auto;
}

Play with the demo here.

| improve this answer | |
  • I can't get this to work - there's a million lines of CSS and JS in your playground – T4NK3R Nov 29 '15 at 11:20
  • I recommend using overflow: hidden; on body as long as it doesn't scroll to the top of the page automatically. But when it does scroll to the top automatically, you should try using overflow: auto; height: 100% on body. – tylerl Aug 9 '16 at 19:19
0

There's also a funny trick to lock the parent's scrollTop when mouse hovers over a scrollable element. This way you don't have to implement your own wheel scrolling.

Here's an example for preventing document scroll, but it can be adjusted for any element.

scrollable.mouseenter(function ()
{
  var scroll = $(document).scrollTop();
  $(document).on('scroll.trap', function ()
  {
    if ($(document).scrollTop() != scroll) $(document).scrollTop(scroll);
  });
});

scrollable.mouseleave(function ()
{
  $(document).off('scroll.trap');
});
| improve this answer | |
0

M.K. offered a great plugin in his answer. Plugin can be found here. However, for the sake of completion, I thought it'd be a good idea to put it together in one answer for AngularJS.

  1. Start by injecting the bower or npm (whichever is preferred)

    bower install jquery-scrollLock --save
    npm install jquery-scroll-lock --save
    
  2. Add the following directive. I am choosing to add it as an attribute

    (function() {
       'use strict';
    
        angular
           .module('app')
           .directive('isolateScrolling', isolateScrolling);
    
           function isolateScrolling() {
               return {
                   restrict: 'A',
                   link: function(sc, elem, attrs) {
                      $('.scroll-container').scrollLock();
                   }
               }
           }
    })();
    
  3. And the important piece the plugin fails to document in their website is the HTML structure that it must follow.

    <div class="scroll-container locked">
        <div class="scrollable" isolate-scrolling>
             ... whatever ...
        </div>
    </div>
    

The attribute isolate-scrolling must contain the scrollable class and it all needs to be inside the scroll-container class or whatever class you choose and the locked class must be cascaded.

| improve this answer | |
0

It is worth to mention that with modern frameworks like reactJS, AngularJS, VueJS, etc, there are easy solutions for this problem, when dealing with fixed position elements. Examples are side panels or overlaid elements.

The technique is called a "Portal", which means that one of the components used in the app, without the need to actually extract it from where you are using it, will mount its children at the bottom of the body element, outside of the parent you are trying to avoid scrolling.

Note that it will not avoid scrolling the body element itself. You can combine this technique and mounting your app in a scrolling div to achieve the expected result.

Example Portal implementation in React's material-ui: https://material-ui-next.com/api/portal/

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0

There is ES 6 crossbrowser + mobile vanila js decision:

function stopParentScroll(selector) {
    let last_touch;
    let MouseWheelHandler = (e, selector) => {
        let delta;
        if(e.deltaY)
            delta = e.deltaY;
        else if(e.wheelDelta)
            delta = e.wheelDelta;
        else if(e.changedTouches){
            if(!last_touch){
                last_touch = e.changedTouches[0].clientY;
            }
            else{
                if(e.changedTouches[0].clientY > last_touch){
                    delta = -1;
                }
                else{
                    delta = 1;
                }
            }
        }
        let prevent = function() {
            e.stopPropagation();
            e.preventDefault();
            e.returnValue = false;
            return false;
        };

        if(selector.scrollTop === 0 && delta < 0){
            return prevent();
        }
        else if(selector.scrollTop === (selector.scrollHeight - selector.clientHeight) && delta > 0){
            return prevent();
        }
    };

    selector.onwheel = e => {MouseWheelHandler(e, selector)}; 
    selector.onmousewheel = e => {MouseWheelHandler(e, selector)}; 
    selector.ontouchmove  = e => {MouseWheelHandler(e, selector)};
}
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0

I was searching for this for MooTools and this was the first that came up. The original MooTools example would work with scrolling up, but not scrolling down so I decided to write this one.


var stopScroll = function (e) {
    var scrollTo = null;
    if (e.event.type === 'mousewheel') {
        scrollTo = (e.event.wheelDelta * -1);
    } else if (e.event.type === 'DOMMouseScroll') {
        scrollTo = 40 * e.event.detail;
    }
    if (scrollTo) {
        e.preventDefault();
        this.scrollTo(0, scrollTo + this.scrollTop);
    }
    return false;
};

Usage:

(function)($){
    window.addEvent('domready', function(){
        $$('.scrollable').addEvents({
             'mousewheel': stopScroll,
             'DOMMouseScroll': stopScroll
        });
    });
})(document.id);
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-1

Simple solution with mouseweel event:

$('.element').bind('mousewheel', function(e, d) {
    console.log(this.scrollTop,this.scrollHeight,this.offsetHeight,d);
    if((this.scrollTop === (this.scrollHeight - this.offsetHeight) && d < 0)
        || (this.scrollTop === 0 && d > 0)) {
        e.preventDefault();
    }
});
| improve this answer | |
-2

You can try it this way:

$('#element').on('shown', function(){ 
   $('body').css('overflow-y', 'hidden');
   $('body').css('margin-left', '-17px');
});

$('#element').on('hide', function(){ 
   $('body').css('overflow-y', 'scroll');
   $('body').css('margin-left', '0px');
});
| improve this answer | |

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