2
import pandas as pd
my_df = pd.DataFrame(columns=['b_code', 'c_code', 'name'], data = [[3401560221954, 6275442, 'name 1'], [987510, 987510, 'name 2'], [4473089, '', 'name 3'], ['', 9584362, 'name 4']])

The above dataframe is a sample set. My dataframe has 70 columns.

What I would like to do is to transform single rows into two rows if two columns 'b_code' and 'c_code' have different values. I am looking for output as below:

    b_code            c_code   name
0   3401560221954              name 1
1                     6275442  name 1
2        987510       987510   name 2
3        4473089               name 3
4                     9584362  name 4
1

How about manually partitioning the dataframe into parts you want to replicate and parts not to be replicated, replicate, and then concatenate everything back together.

cond = (my_df.c_code != my_df.b_code) & (my_df.b_code != '') & (my_df.c_code != '')
repl1 = my_df[cond].copy()
repl1['b_code'] = ''
repl2 = my_df[cond].copy()
repl2['c_code'] = ''
pd.concat([my_df[~cond], repl1, repl2]).sort_index().reset_index(drop=True)


          b_code   c_code    name
0                 6275442  name 1
1  3401560221954           name 1
2         987510   987510  name 2
3        4473089           name 3
4                 9584362  name 4

This does not guarantee the row order of the replication. If you want to guarantee order, you can change the index for one of the replicas. So to get exactly same order as your example, you can do this for repl1 before the last line of code:

repl1.index = np.arange(len(repl1)) + 0.01
1

you can use group by and apply to achieve this. In apply function you can check the condition and split row if your condition match by appending a new row



def split_row(x):
    x= x.copy()
    if (type(x.iloc[0].b_code) is int and type(x.iloc[0].c_code) is int) \
        and (x.iloc[0].b_code != x.iloc[0].c_code):
        new_row = x.copy()
        new_row.b_code=""
        x.c_code = ""
        x=x.append(new_row)

    return x


my_df.groupby(["b_code", "c_code"]).apply(split_row).reset_index(drop=True)
1

Create boolean mask for duplicated rows with Series.ne for not equal, then filter original and concat together rows with changed codes with DataFrame.assign and index for 100% correct ordering, because default algo also in DataFrame.sort_index is unstable quicksort:

mask = my_df['c_code'].ne(my_df['b_code']) & my_df['b_code'].ne('') & my_df['c_code'].ne('')

Alternative mask:

mask = my_df['c_code'].ne(my_df['b_code']) & my_df[['b_code','c_code']].eq('').sum(1).ne(1)

print (mask)
0     True
1    False
2    False
3    False
dtype: bool

df = my_df[mask]
print (df)
          b_code   c_code    name
0  3401560221954  6275442  name 1

df = pd.concat([df.assign(b_code = '').rename(lambda x: x + .3), 
                df.assign(c_code = '').rename(lambda x: x + .5),  
                my_df[~mask]]).sort_index().reset_index(drop=True)
print (df)
          b_code   c_code    name
0                 6275442  name 1
1  3401560221954           name 1
2         987510   987510  name 2
3        4473089           name 3
4                 9584362  name 4

If ordering is not important in duplicated rows:

df = pd.concat([df.assign(b_code = ''), 
                df.assign(c_code = ''),  
                my_df[~mask]]).sort_index().reset_index(drop=True)

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