0

I have a list of dictionaries and every dictionary has the word as key, and the number of times that word appears in a particular document as value. Now I am wondering How can I find how many dictionaries a particular word appears in?

suppose I have a list of following dictionaries:

dict1 = {'Association':5, 'Rule':2, 'Mining':3}
dict2 = {'Rule':4, 'Mining':1}
dict3 = {'Association':4, 'Mining':3}

Result after counting how many dictionaries a word appears in:

result_dict = {'Association':2, 'Rule':2, 'Mining':3}
  • Can you give some examples? And show what have you tried? – ngShravil.py Sep 22 at 6:43
  • Dear @ngShravil.py I have edited the question. – Jawad Tariq Sep 22 at 7:29
1

This can be easily done with dict comprehension.
First, make a list out of your dicts:

dict1 = {'Association':5,'Rule':2,'Mining':3}
dict2 = {'Rule':4,'Mining':1}
dict3 = {'Association':4,'Mining':3}

dicts = [dict1, dict2, dict3]

Then, make a set of all the words in the dictionaries with a union (might be a cleaner way to do this, but this worked):

all_words = set().union(*[d.keys() for d in dicts])

Then, count how many dictionaries each word appears in:

{k: sum([1 for d in dicts if k in d.keys()]) for k in all_words}

This returned the desired output from your example.

  • @JawadTariq, Itamar's reply for your case-insensitivity question is basically to replace for k in all_words with for k in map(str.lower, all_words). In the future, please comment on the answer you're referring to, not on another answer. And please ask new questions separately, especially if you've already accepted an answer. – EliadL Sep 22 at 12:15
  • Thankyou @Eliadl. I will take care of it next time. – Jawad Tariq Sep 23 at 6:07
2

Counter is a dict subclass that can be useful here:

from collections import Counter


dicts = [dict1, dict2, dict3]

key_counters = [Counter(dictionary.keys()) for dictionary in dicts]
start_counter = Counter()

result_dict = sum(key_counters, start_counter)

assert result_dict == {'Association': 2, 'Rule': 2, 'Mining': 3}
  • This is a better answer than mine, and should be accepted. – Itamar Mushkin Sep 22 at 10:12
  • @ItamarMushkin how I can ignore case sensitivity. Association and association are being treated differently. – Jawad Tariq Sep 22 at 10:17
  • Edited my answer to include case-insensitivity. In the future, please comment on the answer you're referring to, not on another answer. – Itamar Mushkin Sep 22 at 10:24
  • 2
    Itamar thanks. @JawadTariq please ask new questions separately, especially if you've already accepted an answer. – EliadL Sep 22 at 11:49
  • @JawadTariq For the sake of completeness, case insensitivity can be achieved here too similarly, by replacing dictionary.keys() with key.lower() for key in dictionary.keys(). – EliadL Sep 22 at 19:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.