3

I've set up Devise to manage the authentication to my app.

I have a Category model in which users create their own categories. User has_many :categories. This model has a user_id attribute, so when someone logs in and goes to categories/index for example, from the controller the query would bring categories using current_user.id to filter out which ones to bring.

So far straight forward and works well, nobody seems to be able to see someone else's categories, but to be honest, unless I'm missing something, this seems a bit insecure. How do I know some hacker will not figure it out and send his own requests modifying the params?

Is this possible or am I being paranoid? Also, I might not be using the functionality properly?

2
  • I'm not sure I understand exactly where you 'bring in the categories.' Is this in the controller? View? Provided you are using a relationship where the User has_many :categories, you can use current_user.categories and current_user.categories.build (in your controller). If you can give an example of where your code is and how it is being used, that would probably give us a better idea about the security. It actually sounds like you're filtering for the current user inside the views rather than the controller, which seems like a bad idea to me. Apr 27 '11 at 14:18
  • edited question to address your comments. filtering does happen from the controller. Is there absolutely no way, that done in this way you could potentially look at other people's info?
    – Lievcin
    Apr 27 '11 at 14:30
2

Provided you're using the proper relationship between users and categories, i.e.

# in User.rb
has_many :categories

# in Category.rb
belongs_to :user

you should be able to use something like this in your controller:

@categories = current_user.categories

This way you're using the current user regardless of what parameters may be passed, and it will only get their galleries. You're not searching by a potentially insecure user_id anymore.

If you're worried about someone being able to view a category that isn't theirs, you can add your own private method similar to :authenticate_user! to make sure that the category being shown or edited actually belongs to the current user, running it in a before_filter like the other one, and redirecting if they don't have permission.

  private
  def authenticate_owner!
    if user_signed_in? && current_user.id == params[:id] # or something similar
      return true
    end
    redirect_to root_url,
      :notice => "You must have permission to access this category."
    return false
  end
4
  • Thanks for the suggestion. This wouldn't prevent the categories from being listed in the first place I assume. Do you think my fears are ungrounded? (If I didn't implement my own method on top of devise)
    – Lievcin
    Apr 27 '11 at 14:42
  • It depends exactly who you want accessing the categories. These can be applied to any of your controller actions. I'd use current_user.categories for your index or any other view if you only want viewers to see their own categories. The method I include I only apply to things that I want identity-based access to, such as the :show action for a personal photo gallery. Apr 27 '11 at 14:52
  • I personally don't know enough about how sessions work in Devise nor enough about how your code works (or what should be secure) to tell you whether your fears are fully ungrounded. But Devise only gives you the user's ability to log on and a user session with an identity, and can restrict access based on being logged in. Working with that, you have to implement your own methods to further restrict access after a user is logged in. (in my experience, at least) Apr 27 '11 at 14:55
  • The question deals with ownership rather than permissions where a simple where method (i.e. find_by_id_and_created_by_user_id) would prevent others from viewing the category.
    – rxgx
    Mar 26 '12 at 7:41
1

I think you have the relationship setup for a one-to-one (one category per user) instead of a one-to-many (many categories per user). If you have a category_id in the User model, the following should be your setup.

# in User.rb
belongs_to :category

# in Category.rb
has_many :users

# in CategoriesController
@category = current_user.category

If you want to have multiple categories per user, than I suggest using a link table (as model UserCategory) with user_id and category_id.

# in UserCategory.rb
belongs_to :user
belongs_to :category

# in User.rb
has_many :user_categories
has_many :categories, :through => :user_categories

# in Category.rb
has_many :user_categories
has_many :users, :through => :user_categories

Then, in your Category controller you can use your code from above to grab all categories by a given user.

# in CategoriesController.rb
@categories = current_user.categories
0

Based on Josh's answer, I just made it into an if else statement. I converted params[:id] to integer since current_user.id returns one.

class UsersController < ApplicationController
  before_filter :authenticate_owner!
  #....
  private
  def authenticate_owner!
    if user_signed_in? && current_user.id == params[:id].to_i
      return
    else
      redirect_to root_url, :notice => "You must have permission to access this page."
    end
  end
end

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.