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We have a .NET Core console app that is triggered by an Azure service bus queue. My understanding is that the default lifetime of the DbContext via DI is Scoped and that it's recommended to let DI and the framework manage the lifetime instead of using using statements. However, we have the following case where we call SaveChanges(), it fails, so we try to call it again to write a log to the db. What's the recommended approach here? It feels weird to use using when the context is injected by DI to the calling class.

try
{
    db.Add(new MyEntity());
    db.SaveChanges();
}
catch (Exception ex) // a constraint is violated
{
    db.Add(new LogEntity("Unable to save MyEntity"));
    db.SaveChanges(); // this fails because MyEntity is still in scope of the context
}
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  • You are correct - you should not Dispose of db (i.e. no need for using) if it was been injected in. That is the container's job. I humbly disagree with the below answer (in terms of using). In terms of logging, I'd suggest writing to the log using a logging library, rather than using the db context.
    – mjwills
    Sep 24, 2019 at 1:09
  • maybe you can set the entity state as detached and then save the log, if it is possible? like db.Entry(myEntity).State = EntityState.Detached Sep 24, 2019 at 6:45
  • It is recommended to split Business logic and Log logic with different DbContext. I recommend you inject two DbContext for different options. Or, you may consider creating a new service for logging which will inject DbContext into it. Then, use this log service while required.
    – Edward
    Sep 25, 2019 at 5:21

2 Answers 2

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My understanding is that the default lifetime of the DbContext via DI is Scoped and that it's recommended to let DI and the framework manage the lifetime instead of using using statements.

This is not accurate, DI is a method for instantiating objects, but you can still control the scope of the objects... example using Ninject (more info):

// this would create a new MyType instance on every request
kernel.Bind<IMyType>().To<MyType>().InTransientScope();

// this would share MyType instance within the same Thread
kernel.Bind<IMyType>().To<MyType>().InThreadScope();

// this would share MyType instance within the same Web Request
kernel.Bind<IMyType>().To<MyType>().InRequestScope();

Regarding the scope of DbContext, see Microsoft's recommendation:

A DataContext is lightweight and is not expensive to create. A typical LINQ to SQL application creates DataContext instances at method scope or as a member of short-lived classes that represent a logical set of related database operations.

So it is generally a good idea to share the same instance of DbContext within the same method... the exception here is with logging. It is not a good idea to mix your Logger's DbContext with the operations that it is logging. Logging should be independent of these operations... you many choose to log your message in a text file, email, DB... if you want to use DB for logging, you can consider using a different DB for your log message. Also Consider using logging frameworks such as Serilog, NLog, etc

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    Your link is regarding Linq.DataContext, not DbContext. Regardless, thanks for the input. We are considering setting the DbContext lifetime to Transient or finding a way to separate our logging service.
    – NSouth
    Sep 24, 2019 at 16:56
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//// one of safest way as DbContext is not thread safe 
List<Model> Items;
await using (var _dataContext = new DataContext(connectionString:"connection String"))
{
    Boughts = await _dataContext.YourModel.ToListAsync();
}

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