1

I have a simple query

select bod_vykonu_kod, count(1)
from cdc_s5_zdroj
group by 1
order by 1 desc;

Which runs in parallel like it should.
Explain analyze: https://explain.depesz.com/s/auVt

Then if I put the same query in function it does not run in parallel. I tried it as STABLE or VOLATILE and still no parallel. I also added PARALLEL SAFE but no difference.

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION 
test_par () 
returns table (
t_column1 bigint,
t_column2 bigint
)

volatile
PARALLEL SAFE
AS $dbvis$

BEGIN

RETURN QUERY
select bod_vykonu_kod, count(1)
from cdc_s5_zdroj
group by 1
order by 1 desc;

END;
$dbvis$ LANGUAGE plpgsql

Explain analyze volatile: https://explain.depesz.com/s/glFO
Explain analyze stable: https://explain.depesz.com/s/vnXO
Explain analyze stable and parallel safe: https://explain.depesz.com/s/QlKM

PostgreSQL 11.5 on x86_64-pc-linux-gnu, compiled by gcc (GCC) 4.8.5 20150623 (Red Hat 4.8.5-36), 64-bit
max_parallel_workers = 8
max_parallel_workers_per_gather = 4

Am I doing something wrong or functions does not support parallel execution like this?

2

I had this same issue with a plpgsql function. RETURN QUERY never ran in parallel. The only solution I could find was to do something like this, because CREATE TABLE AS will use parallel processing:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION 
test_par () 
returns table (
t_column1 bigint,
t_column2 bigint
)

volatile
AS $dbvis$

BEGIN
CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE my_temp ON COMMIT DROP AS
select bod_vykonu_kod, count(1)
from cdc_s5_zdroj
group by 1
order by 1 desc;

RETURN QUERY SELECT * FROM my_temp;
DROP TABLE IF EXISTS my_temp;
END;
$dbvis$ LANGUAGE plpgsql

It's not ideal, but for my situation, it was still a lot faster than not using parallel processing.

| improve this answer | |
  • As far as I can tell, it is because processing can be suspended, see the documentation. I have not verified this though. – Laurenz Albe Sep 24 '19 at 12:52
  • Yes, that's what I figured as well, although it seems strange that they explicitly mention FOR x IN query LOOP and not RETURN QUERY which seems more common and less obvious to me. – Jeremy Sep 24 '19 at 13:08
  • @LaurenzAlbe I don't think RETURN QUERY can actually be suspended, though. It gathers its entire results before returning them, unlike FOR x IN QUERY. This smells like a bug, or at least a mal-feature, someone might want to check with the mailing list. "The current implementation of RETURN NEXT and RETURN QUERY stores the entire result set before returning from the function, as discussed above." postgresql.org/docs/current/plpgsql-control-structures.html – jjanes Sep 24 '19 at 16:17
  • Thank you it does work, though it is not the right solution in my case – Baker Sep 25 '19 at 8:38
1

I dug into the code to see why RETURN QUERY does not support parallel execution.

The reason is that it uses a cursor to fetch query result in batches of 50, and queries executed using a cursor are not run in parallel (because execution could be suspended).

This is the relevant code in function exec_stmt_return_query from src/pl/plpgsql/src/pl_exec.c:

exec_stmt_return_query(PLpgSQL_execstate *estate,
                       PLpgSQL_stmt_return_query *stmt)
{
[...]
    if (stmt->query != NULL)
    {
        /* static query */
        exec_run_select(estate, stmt->query, 0, &portal);
    }
[...]
    while (true)
    {
        uint64      i;

        SPI_cursor_fetch(portal, true, 50);

[...]
| improve this answer | |
  • thank you for the explanation, though I must say this behaviour is quite unfortunate since I am using functions to encapsulate queries for our front-end. Hopefully in some future updates there will be some solution for this. – Baker Sep 25 '19 at 8:17
  • Write a complaint to the pgsql-hackers mailing list. That's what all the important people read. – Laurenz Albe Sep 25 '19 at 8:31

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