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Why here m.wait(); is causing IllegalMonitorStateException exception even though the current thread (main) holds the lock of object m before calling m.wait();?

import java.util.concurrent.locks.*;

class Lock1 extends ReentrantLock{
}

class Main{
public void test() throws InterruptedException{
synchronized(this){
Lock1 m = new Lock1();    
System.out.println("line 1");
m.lock();
System.out.println(m.getHoldCount());
System.out.println(m.isHeldByCurrentThread());
System.out.println("line 2");
m.wait();
System.out.println("line 3");
}
}
public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException{
Main t1 = new Main();
t1.test();
}
}
  • You should synchronize on m and not the current execution instance to wait on it. – Mapsy Sep 24 '19 at 15:53
  • This question might help you to clear your doubts stackoverflow.com/questions/49610644/… – Gatusko Sep 24 '19 at 16:06
  • 1
    Use a Lock or use synchronization—not both. And please indent your code properly so others can read it. If your code is hard to read, fewer people will want to help you. – VGR Sep 24 '19 at 16:13
1

You are mixing old-style synchronized, Object.wait() with the ReentrantLock's methods.

Specifically, the m.wait() is oldstyle Object.wait(), not anything defined in ReentrantLock. You need to use ReentrantLock's Conditions (ie. newCondition()) if you want to yield until some condition changes and another thread notifies you.

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Just because you have locked the lock doesn't mean you have the monitor for said object. You must use synchronized to take the monitor for the object. Something like:

try
{
    synchronized(m)
    {
        m.wait();
    }
}
catch(InterruptedException e)
{
}

lock() on a lock means that you acquire the lock if it's available. If the lock isn't available, the thread will block until the lock is released by another thread.
synchronized on an Object means to acquire the monitor for said Object. If the monitor isn't available, the thread will block until the monitor is released by another thread and the current thread is notify()ed to wake up.

  • who notify() the thread that monitor is released and available to be acquired? I couldn't understand the difference between acquiring a lock and/or monitor. – raven03 Sep 24 '19 at 16:12
  • @raven03 You use notify/notifyAll, which are methods defined in Object. So, when you exit the synchronized(m) block, you can wake up waiting threads with m.notifyAll();. Locks are concurrent locks that manage access to parts of the code ("critical sections"). Object monitors are concurrent locks that manage access to a shared resource (the object) during "critical sections". The problem that you have is that you try to use both of them at the same time without precisely understanding how your usage will affect which thread holds and releases the lock/resource(s). – Avi Sep 24 '19 at 16:29

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